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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jul. 6, 2005
    Location
    Aiken, SC
    Posts
    1,543

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    Well, I was wrong. The knitters were just taking their time mulling things over. So it looks like the cooperative is just fine. I'm going to start drawing up a contract tonight. Basically, I get the sheep and they get the wool. Yay!



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Apr. 23, 1999
    Location
    Rosehill, TX
    Posts
    7,092

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    Barbados Blackbelly Sheep -- they shed so no shearing
    Nothing says "I love you" like a tractor. (Clydejumper)

    The reports states, “Elizabeth reported that she accidently put down this pony, ........, at the show.”



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jul. 6, 2005
    Location
    Aiken, SC
    Posts
    1,543

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    Quote Originally Posted by SGray View Post
    Barbados Blackbelly Sheep -- they shed so no shearing
    I just looked them up. How very interesting

    I'm actually looking for wool sheep, though. That's how I'm getting the knitters involved. I'm very excited about the Gulf Coast sheep. Have you ever read about them?



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Apr. 30, 2008
    Posts
    203

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    I had sheep and goats for years before I had horses at home (my horses were at a boarding barn). Sheep do keep your fields looking swank - really a great combo with goats to keep the prickly stuff and poison ivy eaten. Portable electrified web fencing (I think that Premier is one vendor) is a great solution for containment and is a deterrent to coyotes though not if they are really motivated. Goats are more fun to hang out with, sheep are sweet and dim and fun to eat (I can't eat goats or girl sheep, but don't have any trouble taking the obnoxious six month old baby rams to market). I really enjoyed them, it was great having babies in the spring. It's worth looking into the local sheep community because you will need advice, shearing, slaughterhouse and a ram to borrow etc. I live in a big sheep area so it was easy to find kindred spirits and everyone was really nice - the local l4-h is a great place to start. You can feel good about eating sustainably raised, locally grown meat and those sheepskins are really nice under your toes next to the bed. Have fun!



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jul. 6, 2005
    Location
    Aiken, SC
    Posts
    1,543

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    Thought I'd give an update

    I got 2 horned Gulf Coast wethers on February 26, and I am SO pleased with them! They are great little weedeaters and have learned to be very friendly with humans. I've started a fiber cooperative with some friends from college, and am maintaining a blog about it. You can see videos and pictures of the sheep there.

    Thanks to everyone for the advice!



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jun. 23, 2004
    Location
    Fauquier County, VA
    Posts
    10,467

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    I have 5 Suffolk ewes and they are awesome at helping to maintain the pastures and also as pets. They are very sweet!



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Mar. 28, 2003
    Location
    Hunterdon County, NJ
    Posts
    3,107

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    I used to have a sheep in with my horses and she did fine. One mare would let the ewe walk between her legs. Sheep are great at keeping your pasture down.

    My sister has about 7 Leicester Longwools (a rare wool breed). The wool is gorgeous. I'm lucky because she shears them, painstakingly cleans and combs the wool, and then I get to spin and knit it!

    There are lots of knitting and spinning groups out there. Maybe you could offer them the wool if they pay for shearing.
    Kendra -- Runningwater Warmbloods
    SPS Diorella (Donnerhall/ Akut), EM Raleska (Rascalino/ Warkant), and Carmelina (Contender/ Lancetto)
    'Like' us on Facebook



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jul. 6, 2005
    Location
    Aiken, SC
    Posts
    1,543

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    Quote Originally Posted by hansiska View Post
    There are lots of knitting and spinning groups out there. Maybe you could offer them the wool if they pay for shearing.
    That's the basic principle of my fiber co-op.

    When I was in college, I belonged to a knitting circle. I contacted the girls who were in the circle with me, and a couple of them decided that they wanted to sponsor a couple of sheep. So they pay for the sheep's upkeep, and I will send them each one sheep's worth of wool every spring.

    There's more info about it at my sheep blog.



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