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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec. 26, 2008
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    North Carolina
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    Post Rough times, are they necessary?

    It seems like every horse i have gotten has always given me trouble in some sort of way. Like my first horse who i had to pretty much learn how to ride/train a green horse which wasn't smart sense i didn't know what i was doing. My second horse was basically a run away pony that couldn't be stopped. And now my current horse is have a lot of trouble with his back and i was planing to go BN with him this spring but it looks like i cant.

    Is this just a rough patch in the road every great rider has to go through?
    ...Or is it just my natural bad luck?
    Why walk when you can ride?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul. 5, 2006
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    630

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    I feel for you. It's just a rough patch. Really, when it's about horses, it's about rough patches--it's never just one!.

    I don't know anyone who hasn't had a series of problems, whether they are due to health, injury, or riding--for both horse and rider. It can be very frustrating, but just work through it and try to keep a positive attitude--oh, and every once in awhile, curse the gods and throw back a good strong drink!



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec. 27, 1999
    Location
    Midland, NC, USA
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    No, they are not necessary. Although I think very few people who are in the horse biz escape completely unscathed, I would take a constant stream of hardships as a sign that something is amiss. For instance the first two horses could probably have been avoided had you been working with a good trainer who could have advised you on your purchase decisions. So there are ways you can stack the deck in your favor--working with a good trainer, having an appropriate prepurchase exam done on prospective horses, being realistic about what type of horse you need to buy (which again the trainer can help you with), being realistic about your goals, finances, time, etc.

    Jennifer



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun. 16, 2004
    Location
    ocala,florida....the place to be!
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    3,059

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    i agree with jennifer, you have to have the right people/team behind you to help you make the right choices. but with horses there will always be ups and downs, you just have to know how to try and keep the cards decked in your favor. good trainer, farrier, and a great vet helps good luck.
    www.camaloufarms.com

    ride it like you stole it! "ralph hill"



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec. 26, 2008
    Location
    North Carolina
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    141

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    Thanks guys! Im going to really keep this in mind!!
    Why walk when you can ride?



  6. #6
    Join Date
    May. 23, 2006
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    5,461

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    Quote Originally Posted by eventr4life View Post
    Is this just a rough patch in the road every great rider has to go through?

    "I" would not know...not being a "great" rider.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun. 9, 2003
    Location
    Dolores,CO. Proud to be a Kraut
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    beeing a shity rider, suck all the way, but having rough times with a horse, is standard.

    Most realy great hosrses suck at one point, working them through it makes them great horses
    That I have no use for them, does not mean, that I don't know them and don't know how to use them.
    Caveman extraordinair



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan. 9, 2007
    Location
    LaSalle, IL
    Posts
    56

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    eventr4life I feel your pain. My daughter went through some of the same things you are going through. When money is an issue, you live in cowboy country and you're the only one with an english saddle, good trainers are a couple hours away, you have a trailer but have to borrow dad's work truck to go anywhere things can be tough. I give my girl credit for working through those "teachers", and she had a couple doozies. Even the well trained HUS horse we were finally able to get for her had to be taught to jump and do dressage before she could do eventing with him. We did that ourselves and they did great! I agree that having a good trainer is a God send but, still, make lemonade .... At college in NC she rode successfully on the dressage team and was used to show some of the hunter riders how to really ride a jumper. Good luck!



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct. 4, 2007
    Location
    Maryland
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    217

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    In any horse sport (and it seems like especially in eventing) there are always ups and downs. The thing is that you're not only dealing with human beings but with another species as well. And they have their own opinions about what they want to be doing, their own health problems. I've gone through the rough patches too(I sincerely hope that my new horse will put the end to them!). With my first leased horse who introduced me to eventing, I've been able to do only 1 rec. BN due to unlucky weather that year. Then, my first horse decided that she did not want to jump, and we just did not click at all. With my second(leased) horse I did another BN event, after which she had almost 6 month of various health issues. Now, finally, my third horse, and I am keeping my fingers crossed that he will finally take me to events a bit more consistantly. But, here I am, almost 3 years later with only 2 events to my name (working with the wonderful trainer). So, yes, I can totally relate. Sometimes there are rough times. Keep your nose up and just keep going. What other choice do we have? I believe that luck comes to those who persevere. I bet most people who had horses for long period of time had to deal with horses who were difficult, did not suite them or the purpose and/or had health problems. It just comes in different times of their riding careers.

    Jingles for your horse! hope your rough patch will end soon!



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep. 12, 2005
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
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    Quote Originally Posted by ThirdCharm View Post
    No, they are not necessary. Although I think very few people who are in the horse biz escape completely unscathed, I would take a constant stream of hardships as a sign that something is amiss. For instance the first two horses could probably have been avoided had you been working with a good trainer who could have advised you on your purchase decisions. So there are ways you can stack the deck in your favor--working with a good trainer, having an appropriate prepurchase exam done on prospective horses, being realistic about what type of horse you need to buy (which again the trainer can help you with), being realistic about your goals, finances, time, etc.

    Jennifer


    Totally agree.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct. 1, 2003
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    Nonsuch House
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    Quote Originally Posted by ThirdCharm View Post
    No, they are not necessary. Although I think very few people who are in the horse biz escape completely unscathed, I would take a constant stream of hardships as a sign that something is amiss. For instance the first two horses could probably have been avoided had you been working with a good trainer who could have advised you on your purchase decisions. So there are ways you can stack the deck in your favor--working with a good trainer, having an appropriate prepurchase exam done on prospective horses, being realistic about what type of horse you need to buy (which again the trainer can help you with), being realistic about your goals, finances, time, etc.

    Jennifer

    I have to second or third this
    RIP Kelly 1977-2007 "Wither thou goest, so shall I"

    "To tilt when you should withdraw is Knightly too."



  12. #12
    Join Date
    May. 23, 2007
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    Southern Indiana
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    I really don't believe in luck. Sure, there are unfortunate coincidences and bad breaks which suck all the same. But I think people make their own luck.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr. 11, 2006
    Location
    Lodi Ohio
    Posts
    1,423

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    You might want to read "Ride the Right Horse" by Yvonne Barteau. Understanding a horse's personality may help you get to the heart of the matter.

    Nancy



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec. 26, 2008
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    141

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    thank you all for your reply! You really have to think common sense "why have a trouble horse when you can have a great schooled one" my current horse right now(leasing) i thought was well schooled but turned out he didnt know as much as we thought.
    NMK: thank you! i will definitly look into that book!!

    ThirdCharm: you definitly put everything into perspective for me!!
    Why walk when you can ride?



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2002
    Location
    West Coast of Michigan
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    Who is it that has the quote "no hour in the saddle is ever wasted" as part of their signature line? We learn, and our horses learn, every time we ride them. As long as one is not going backwards WRT training (or, put it another way, undoing good schooling) then even the things learned during difficult times and with difficult horses are part of the quiver of arrows a good horseman needs.

    If you set artificial goals such as "I want to be doing XXX level by this time next year" or "I want to take my green QH to Rolex in 2010" then you are bound to be disappointed. If, however, you make goals that are based on a logical progression of training, then the goals are being met as you go along and arriving at the destination (BN, a CCI*, Rolex, whatever) are just icing on the cake.

    It's kind of like saying "I want to be a brain surgeon, but I hate school". It's not going to work. You have to learn to love school.
    Click here before you buy.



  16. #16
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    Jul. 5, 2006
    Posts
    630

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    ThirdCharm, that is such good advice. I especially like your line about stacking the decks in your favor; it's so true.

    I've found that even though I've stacked the decks in my favor, things do happen with horses that are often beyond our control. And finding that, I've learned to take a deep breath, deal with the issues at hand, and be willing to move forward and seek out good advice, whether it's from your vet, farrier, instructor, or fellow horsemen. It's always an adventure!



  17. #17
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    Feb. 4, 2004
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    2,631

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    Hindsight is 20/20, and we all have things that in retrospect, could have been avoided.

    I'm sure everyone on this board has kicked themselves a few times in a why did I buy this horse/move up a level at this event/attempt this fence/attend this clinic/whatever sort of moment.

    The best we can do is analyze these mistakes and learn from them so we don't repeat them. Some of them do get easier to spot ahead of time.

    There is also a lot of bad luck in the world (horse pasture injuries, rained out events, broken down trucks) that is truly just luck.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jan. 29, 2008
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    The South, but not far enough
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    356

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    Quote Originally Posted by deltawave View Post
    Who is it that has the quote "no hour in the saddle is ever wasted" as part of their signature line?
    I think that would be me? And, I find it interesting and comforting every time I discover another facet to this statement. THANKS!
    No hour of life is lost that is spent in the saddle.
    -- Winston Churchill



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jul. 31, 2008
    Location
    Area III
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    43

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    that's just horses.... very sorry to hear it. my current prelim horse couldn't be competed for the first 9 months after i bought him because he was a nutter so needless to say, i think everyone on this forum could probably throw out an example of "rough times" per say.... just kick on and don't give up!!!!
    I'll lean on you and you lean on me and we'll be okay. -Dave Matthews Band



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Nov. 29, 2007
    Location
    Virginia
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    969

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    I'm with Beam Me Up, georgiaeventer, etc. who said that, despite all you can try to do to stack the deck in your favor, things can and do go wrong with horses. Examples: my once-in-a-lifetime horse getting kicked in the pasture, resulting in a fractured leg, never the same again. After a lifetime of being with horses, riding, and now over 10 years of having a stable full of them, I NEVER thought I'd have a founder -- I was obsessive about avoiding any possible triggers. Guess what? This spring, my young mare foundered.

    It does become difficult when horses become unrideable due to injury or unsoundness or whatever. If your resources are limited, but you hate to let any animal that's been a part of your family go, you can end up with a barn full of beloved companions who can't do competitions, and none that can because you can't afford another horse. So, you decide to modify your goals or do what you can do to enjoy them, one day at a time.

    Those are just my examples, less about training difficulties than illness and injury issues, but still I stand behind what georgiaeventer said, "that's just horses."



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