The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 1 of 5 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 95
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul. 23, 2007
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    879

    Default Suggestions for finding home for unsound horse

    I already posted under the free board. This is a friend's horse I am posting.
    He is a coming 11 yr old warmblood...holsteiner/Tb cross....16.2 and a good guy.

    Friend bought him last spring and something had to have been done cause he was sound with perfect x-rays...went lame after 3 months....MRI shows navicular bursa problem.....and not a new problem. he has scars found by vet not in the usual place a horse would be nerved.
    Anyway....friend wants to continue her jumping/show career....cannot qwith this guy. He "may" be sound enough to trail ride....
    Any suggestions on where she could find him a home...as a give away...but she doesn't want him to wind up at auction etc if someone thinks they can 'cure" him and they can't...there is no "cure"

    Any help appreciated.
    Adriane
    Happily retired but used to be:
    www.ParrotNutz.com



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar. 25, 2008
    Location
    Goshen NY
    Posts
    2,627

    Default Hay

    This is an unfortunate situation and not a new one. Two things I would recommend.

    1. Have your friend find retirement board for this horse for the rest of his life. You can find some pasture/run-in shed places.

    2. Mercifully put the horse down.

    There are so many free horses out there...sound horses going for $50 bucks at auctions across the country or going on a double decker to Mexico. I would opt for two if she is not willing to foot the bill for this horse the rest of its life.

    These are live animals and yes, they can become lame two months after purchasing. Prior to buying a horse, I think all need to be aware of what they are going to do with a horse should it not become useful. It's just the responsible thing to do.
    Sorry! But that barn smell is my aromatherapy!
    One of our horsey bumper stickers! www.horsehollowpress.com
    Add Very Funny Horse Bumper Stickers on facebook



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug. 7, 2005
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    2,500

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pines4equines View Post
    This is an unfortunate situation and not a new one. Two things I would recommend.

    1. Have your friend find retirement board for this horse for the rest of his life. You can find some pasture/run-in shed places.

    2. Mercifully put the horse down.

    There are so many free horses out there...sound horses going for $50 bucks at auctions across the country or going on a double decker to Mexico. I would opt for two if she is not willing to foot the bill for this horse the rest of its life.

    These are live animals and yes, they can become lame two months after purchasing. Prior to buying a horse, I think all need to be aware of what they are going to do with a horse should it not become useful. It's just the responsible thing to do.
    AMEN



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar. 4, 2004
    Location
    Louisville, KY
    Posts
    3,967

    Default

    I agree with p4e. There is nothing wrong with putting a horse like this down. It may be the best for all parties involved (both your friend and the horse ).

    Caitlin
    Caitlin
    *OMGiH I Loff my Mare* and *My Saddlebred Can Do Anything Your Horse Can Do*
    http://community.webshots.com/user/redmare01



  5. #5
    Join Date
    May. 3, 2006
    Posts
    11,568

    Default

    This horse might have a chance if it's owner posted what she was prepared to contribute in terms of it's costs once it's rehomed.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun. 29, 2006
    Posts
    101

    Default Homes for Unsound Horses

    Hi,

    You can have your friend contact me directly and I would be happy to try to help. We have helped placed many horses that are pasture sound only...you can see the latest one, Raneem, with his family on our blog.

    Have a great night!

    Jo



    Jo Deibel
    President/Director
    Angel Acres Horse Haven Rescue, Inc.
    www.saveahorsenow.com
    PO Box 62
    Glenville, PA 17329
    Phone: 717-965-7901
    Fax: 866-892-5069
    Last edited by angelacres; Dec. 27, 2008 at 07:45 PM. Reason: removed red smiley



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul. 23, 2007
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    879

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pines4equines View Post
    This is an unfortunate situation and not a new one. Two things I would recommend.

    1. Have your friend find retirement board for this horse for the rest of his life. You can find some pasture/run-in shed places.

    2. Mercifully put the horse down.

    There are so many free horses out there...sound horses going for $50 bucks at auctions across the country or going on a double decker to Mexico. I would opt for two if she is not willing to foot the bill for this horse the rest of its life.

    These are live animals and yes, they can become lame two months after purchasing. Prior to buying a horse, I think all need to be aware of what they are going to do with a horse should it not become useful. It's just the responsible thing to do.

    First let me say....I offered to post this for my friend...trying to help.

    Second...she is trying to do the responsible thing. she had a prepurchase to the tune of 1200.00 She spent a lot of money finding out what was wrong with him and while horses do go unsound after purchase this has been diagnosed as NOT a NEW injury....via an MRI...but the horse was purchased out of state and it would cost more to pursue legal action than the purchase price of the horse.He was not a rich woman's priced horse

    She knows she cannot afford to board him the rest of his life and get a horse to ride......while some may feel that is terrible....that is a fact which is why she will not let him wind up at auction etc.

    I took it upon myself to ask and see if there were any alternatives out here. She has already contacted a vet school to donate him to, but they are full up. She is considering having him put down since he is so very lame.

    I guess what I am trying to say is....lectures are not necessary.....she is an adult who is considering all options humanely and also thinks rather than wind up at auction at the killers that to put him down would be better....
    So please suggestions welcomed...no lectures please.

    She will be getting in touch with the woman who posted here also
    Adriane
    Happily retired but used to be:
    www.ParrotNutz.com



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb. 10, 2006
    Location
    Middle of Nowhere, take a right, FL
    Posts
    4,425

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pj View Post
    AMEN

    And another AMEN! The only place he'll be truly safe is in her ownership. If he's in pain I'd put him down. If she can't support two I'd put him down. It's not the worst thing that can happen to him. And in today's economy it IS the responsible thing to do. There MIGHT be a home out there she can trust but odds are against finding it.
    Every mighty oak was once a nut that stood its ground.

    Proud Closet Canterer! Member Riders with Fibromyalgia clique.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov. 23, 1999
    Location
    South Coast Plaza
    Posts
    20,330

    Default

    Part of puting the horse first is not sending it off down the road, not knowing what fate awaits it in a year or two. Maybe becoming sound also means maybe becoming DFL. Much to be said for doing the kinest thing and puting the horse down.
    EDDIE WOULD GO



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul. 23, 2007
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    879

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Coreene View Post
    Part of puting the horse first is not sending it off down the road, not knowing what fate awaits it in a year or two. Maybe becoming sound also means maybe becoming DFL. Much to be said for doing the kinest thing and puting the horse down.

    This is probably what will happen, I repeat....posting here was a last ditch effort.
    I worked in the animal medical field and agree that putting him down may be the answer.

    what does DFL stand for?
    Adriane
    Happily retired but used to be:
    www.ParrotNutz.com



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul. 27, 2007
    Location
    Behind the Orange Curtain
    Posts
    9,694

    Default

    Doesn't a lot of it depend on whether the horse is even pasture sound? I mean, is it going to be comfortable even without being ridden?

    The idea of him being retired to green pastures is all well and good, but if his bad leg is as bad as it sounds, I don't think it sounds like that would even be a happy ending for him.

    If he IS pasture sound, I think she's got an ethical dilemma of epic proportions. I don't envy her



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr. 19, 2006
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    193

    Default

    I'm sorry that your friend is going through this. It sucks, and there is no nice way to say this, but...

    She needs to suck it up, and take care of the horse until he meets his maker, or put him down.

    There will be many opportunities to advance her riding career, but if she's a decent human she'll do right by this horse and not make him someone else's problem.

    I speak from experience, having a retired 5 year old gelding. Not usable in any way, shape or form. I was going to put him down, but I decided that it wasn't fair for him. I make the necessairy sacrifices to keep him fed, clothed, and medical taken care of just as if he were a top show horse.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov. 4, 2003
    Location
    Sanger, TX, USA
    Posts
    4,818

    Default

    Is there no way he could be sound for some riding with the use of ixosphrene and
    corrective shoeing? My first horse was diagnosed with navicular 3 or 4 years after I got
    him. With the ixo and shoes, we still did some jumping for a few years until we discovered
    arthritis in a front knee. Still rode him for several more years until the vet said because
    of the arthritis it was time to ride just at a walk or when the ground was very soft.

    Fortunately, I had a backyard to keep him in and he was with us for 19 years until old age
    and the Texas summers became too much. But the navicular was the least of his problems.

    Just a thought...don't envy your friend's predicament. Had one of my best friends tell
    me I should just find Fudge a field somewhere to live in. Duh--why do I need to find him
    pasture board when I've got 3 stalls and 5 acres. Sigh!
    Julie
    www.centaurfencing.com
    Safer, Stronger, Lasts Longer!
    Godspeed BARBARO--Run fast and free!



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov. 23, 1999
    Location
    South Coast Plaza
    Posts
    20,330

    Default

    DFL means Dead Fu$@ing Lame. I truly do feel for your friend, but I also feel that sending him off to Pasture Palhood is just leaving it to someone else to do the deed. They can't sit in front of the tv with their feet up when they are in pain, and you never know if his new situation would include some anthropomorphic whackjob who doesn't have the cojones to put a horse in pain to sleep.
    EDDIE WOULD GO



  15. #15
    Join Date
    May. 3, 2006
    Posts
    11,568

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Parrotnutz View Post
    First let me say....I offered to post this for my friend...trying to help.

    Second...she is trying to do the responsible thing. she had a prepurchase to the tune of 1200.00 She spent a lot of money finding out what was wrong with him and while horses do go unsound after purchase this has been diagnosed as NOT a NEW injury....via an MRI...but the horse was purchased out of state and it would cost more to pursue legal action than the purchase price of the horse.He was not a rich woman's priced horse

    She knows she cannot afford to board him the rest of his life and get a horse to ride......while some may feel that is terrible....that is a fact which is why she will not let him wind up at auction etc.

    I took it upon myself to ask and see if there were any alternatives out here. She has already contacted a vet school to donate him to, but they are full up. She is considering having him put down since he is so very lame.

    I guess what I am trying to say is....lectures are not necessary.....she is an adult who is considering all options humanely and also thinks rather than wind up at auction at the killers that to put him down would be better....
    So please suggestions welcomed...no lectures please.

    She will be getting in touch with the woman who posted here also
    Sh** happens with horses and truth be told no matter what you do in terms of ppe things can and do go wrong. Its a living thing and doesn't come with instructions and a guarantee. Neither IMO should horses be treated as commodities (or motorbikes) whereby you buy one, find it's no good or broken so throw it out, pass it on or get rid so you can get a shiny new one that might be better.

    I know that in voicing this opinion on the likes of these forums gets you labelled as some heartless owner enemy or rich toff who doesn't understand what it's like to be poor and not be able to afford to take care of broken horse and when you really want to get another shiny new one that isn't broken.

    But to be frank I've absolutely no time nor interesting in helping anyone to pass on a broken horse so they can move on to getting a new one.

    If the horse is not suffering but is merely not fit for what she intended but is able to be a "trail horse" and lightly used then I can't begin to understand why folks are even suggesting to put it down. Heck that's what we're told and we're also told it's only been lame for 3 months!

    So I'm struggling to understand how or why a vet would indulge any owner in such practice. Surely it would be against any vet's ethical principles and code of conduct.

    So the OP's friend can't afford to keep this horse and to get another. She doesn't want him to end up at a meat plant.

    That's dead easy. Look after him. Don't get another!
    Last edited by Thomas_1; Dec. 28, 2008 at 10:02 AM.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Feb. 13, 2005
    Location
    Columbus, OH
    Posts
    6,796

    Default

    Parrotnutz, it sounds like what really happened is that you knew the answer to your own question and now you're ticked off that no one's offering you an alternative. Sorry, but as others have stated in this situation, the options are as obvious to one responsible horse owner like yourself as it is to the rest of us: suck it up and pay for the horse's retirement or put him down. Some people HAVE actually expressed an opinion to you, and I will echo it: if it were my horse, I'd put him down.
    ________________________
    Resident COTH saddle nerd. (CYA: Not a pro, just a long-time enthusiast!)
    http://twitter.com/jenlmichaels



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jul. 23, 2007
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    879

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas_1 View Post
    Sh** happens with horses and truth be told no matter what you do in terms of ppe things can and do go wrong. Its a living thing and doesn't come with instructions and a guarantee. Neither IMO should horses be treated as commodities (or motorbikes) whereby you buy one, find it's no good or broken so throw it out, pass it on or get rid so you can get a shiny new one that might be better.

    I know that in voicing this opinion on the likes of these forums gets you labelled as some heartless owner enemy or rich toff who doesn't understand what it's like to be poor and not be able to afford to take care of broken horse and when you really want to get another shiny new one that isn't broken.

    But to be frank I've absolutely no time nor interesting in helping anyone to pass on a broken horse so they can move on to getting a new one.

    If the horse is not suffering but is merely not fit for what she intended but is able to be a "trail horse" and lightly used then I can't begin to understand why folks are even suggesting to put it down. Heck that's what we're told and we're also told it's only been lame for 3 months!

    So I'm struggling to understand how or why a vet would indulge any owner in such practice. Surely it would be against any vet's ethical principles and code of conduct.

    So the OP's friend can't afford to keep this horse and to get another. She doesn't want him to end up at a meat plant.

    That's dead easy. Look after him. Don't get another!
    Ok 1 more time....
    This horse has not been lame only 3 months...he went lame 3 months after purchase. MRI shows a long standing problem...as witnessed by calcification and scare tissue...old tendon tear, etc. The horse most likely had been nerved and purchaser not told...Nerving only lasts so long.

    I used to work for vets and not matter what a vet might be thinking, the law<right or wrong> is, an animal is a piece of property and if the owner wants it put down it gets put down...I have witnessed this. The vet can refuse to do it but people then find another vet.

    As another poster said...I know the options....but once and awhile one can "dream" someone may have needed a friend for another retiree.
    It happened to me 20+ years ago when I had a dead lame horse.....a person right around the corner from my barn lost her horse's companion and took mine.....where he lived out his entire life. See sometimes there is a Santa Clause <smile>

    That is the reason I posted....to see if anyone, on the small chance, might need a pasture companion.

    There is no way my friend wants to "pass on the problem" to someone else...sigh....I decided to post this here in the oft chance someone needed a companion horse......

    I currently house 6 parrots that were someone elses problems at 1 time so I surely know from where you all speak and neither I nor my friend think in those terms.

    Twas all a dream...forgive me.....after all I am a 58 yr old lady who sometimes remembers the good....and knows life is not written in black and white...there are many shades of grey.....
    Adriane
    Happily retired but used to be:
    www.ParrotNutz.com



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Sep. 28, 2001
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    4,263

    Default

    I think the question is whether the horse is sound enough to do trail riding occasionally, and what his temperament is like...would he be okay for a beginner or occasional rider? How about as a therapy horse? I think some people are jumping the gun by saying he should be put down...even in this economy she may be able to find a home for him if she gives it some time. Big horses are easier to find homes for, in general. I had a big guy that came down with lameness issues. I was prepared to do the "right" thing and put him down, when someone stepped up and said she would love to try him out as an occasional trail horse. It was someone I trusted, and so I gave him to her with the condition that he come back to me if it didn't work out. If he does come back, I would still do the right thing and euthanize him, but at least this way, he has a chance at life.

    Good luck to your friend, and I applaud you for trying to help her out! I hope this guy does find a great retirement home!



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jul. 23, 2007
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    879

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by caryledee View Post
    I think the question is whether the horse is sound enough to do trail riding occasionally, and what his temperament is like...would he be okay for a beginner or occasional rider? How about as a therapy horse? I think some people are jumping the gun by saying he should be put down...even in this economy she may be able to find a home for him if she gives it some time. Big horses are easier to find homes for, in general. I had a big guy that came down with lameness issues. I was prepared to do the "right" thing and put him down, when someone stepped up and said she would love to try him out as an occasional trail horse. It was someone I trusted, and so I gave him to her with the condition that he come back to me if it didn't work out. If he does come back, I would still do the right thing and euthanize him, but at least this way, he has a chance at life. Good luck to your friend, and I applaud you for trying to help her out! I hope this guy does find a great retirement home!


    THANK YOU!! At last someone sees where I came from. My friend doesn't want to saddle someone with the expenses of a lame horse they will try to make sound when the over all verdict is he "might" be sound to trail ride from time to time....maybe. Who wants to try and offer a horse who may be able to work now and then between lamenesses....this is a permanent lameness, no cures.
    She tried the therapy route....no go...seems the economy has even hit there

    You are really lucky and I applaud you also....thanks for the reply. I appreciate it.
    Last edited by Parrotnutz; Dec. 28, 2008 at 11:15 AM. Reason: forgot to post a line
    Adriane
    Happily retired but used to be:
    www.ParrotNutz.com



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2002
    Location
    PA, where the State motto is: "If it makes sense, we don't do it!".
    Posts
    11,042

    Default

    Parrotnutz, Jo Diebel has stepped up to the plate and offered to help your friend rehome her horse. Is your friend willing to do this????

    There are only so many options available.

    I am almost your age. I realized a long time ago that the social climate is no longer what it was even thirty years ago, let alone fifty years ago! I no longer harbor any illusions although yes, I keep hoping there is a Santa Claus out there for every one. Sometimes we have to make our own luck though. I am also finding there is a thin line between hope and delusion. Have your friend call Jo Diebel because she may be that horse's last hope!!!
    "Good gardening is very simple, really. You just have to learn to think like a plant." ~Barbara Damrosch~



Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 6
    Last Post: Oct. 22, 2012, 10:18 PM
  2. 20 y/o UNSOUND horse for 500 bucks???
    By kathtray in forum Off Course
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: Mar. 14, 2011, 01:15 PM
  3. Finding a Quality Home for your horse...give away, cheap, or ?
    By Wooly Wintertime in forum Off Course
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: Jan. 27, 2011, 09:23 PM
  4. Finding a home for a free horse...
    By jse in forum Off Course
    Replies: 34
    Last Post: Feb. 19, 2010, 10:03 AM
  5. Age old query... WWYD w/ a young unsound horse?
    By SuperSTB in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 47
    Last Post: Oct. 21, 2009, 09:01 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness