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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep. 20, 2005
    Location
    Spotsylvania, Virginia
    Posts
    213

    Default Tell me about rubber pavers

    I would really like to put down rubber pavers in the center aisle of my barn. Has anyone put them down or know of someone in the Spotsylvania/Orange area that does this type of work? Also, where can you buy them at?
    Dream Again Farm



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct. 14, 2004
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    8,994

    Default

    I work at a barn that has rubber pavers. Very nice looking plus the footing is great.

    One downfall? They are a real pain in the arse to sweep or hose down.
    Possibly it could be the broom I use, but every bit of hay or shavings just fly around when swept.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct. 16, 2006
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    1,134

    Default

    Agree with difficult to sweep. I once boarded at a barn that had them. BO was very neurotic about every hoof print that was put on from gravel dust outside. She would actually get a scrub brush and try to clean them off. Made for a stressful boarding situation as you were afraid to walk on them or if your horse took a poop--look out!!



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov. 9, 2004
    Location
    Elizabethtown, KY
    Posts
    2,688

    Default

    They are beautiful but expensive. You can buy them from any number of places. There is a place near here called The Rubber Man, I think therubberman.com but not sure. Also I think Farm Tek might sell them, you can google them and a bunch of the stall places and other reatilers sell them by the box. Every time I have looked they have been comparable in price everywhere. Not sure about putting them in. I think it's usually over concrete, the thinner ones get glued if memory serves.

    Real brick pavers get placed in sand I think. I am thinking about getting stone or brick impressions made in the concrete when I do my aisle, and getting it stained. Would be cheaper, lower maintenance, and still look great. But I DO really like the rubber ones, other than the cleaning aspect.
    Destiny is not a matter of chance, it is a matter of choice; it is not a thing to be waited for, it is a thing to be achieved. - William Jennings Bryan

    http://www.halcyon-hill.com



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep. 23, 2005
    Location
    North Central Florida
    Posts
    727

    Default Not pavers but still

    I recently visited a very nice barn that had a rubber floor. It appeared too be a sheet of material maybe 3/8 inch thick.
    It seemed to be layed like carpet in that there were joints but they cut like carpet and almost invisible. It was probably glued down.

    Anybody know about such a thing?

    Dick



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec. 1, 2007
    Location
    Gettysburg, PA
    Posts
    2,616

    Default

    I know of one farm that HAD them - they ripped them out. In speaking with them, they were way too high maint. to keep clean and manure and mud collected without constant work. They now have a very textured concrete
    Epona Farm
    Irish Draughts and Irish Sport horses

    Join us on Facebook



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb. 16, 2004
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    58

    Default

    My aisleways are rubber pavers. I have had them down for almost twenty years. Love them! They aisle is swept at least three times per day. 'O' Cedar angled brooms are the best and powerwashed once a week. Would use them again in a minute! Photos on my website.

    Caduceus Farm, LLC
    Colorado
    http://www.caduceusfarm.com



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct. 5, 1999
    Location
    A place called vertigo
    Posts
    12,396

    Default

    I have them in my barn, and don't care if they are not spotless. They provide great traction both wet and dry, and I'm more concerned about safety than anything else. Be careful about what spills on them, though, I had some bubble when a pony got out and spilled either blue lotion or hoof oil on the floor and it sat there for a while.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar. 29, 2008
    Posts
    3,059

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kearleydk View Post
    I recently visited a very nice barn that had a rubber floor. It appeared too be a sheet of material maybe 3/8 inch thick.
    It seemed to be layed like carpet in that there were joints but they cut like carpet and almost invisible. It was probably glued down.

    Anybody know about such a thing?

    Dick
    There is such a thing as poured rubber flooring. Sounds a little different than what you're talking about, though, it's seamless. http://www.equinesystems.com/evoflex.html



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep. 14, 2000
    Location
    Goochland, VA
    Posts
    8,550

    Default

    Blowers are the way to go with these. And don't get black ones. They show every speck of everything that touches them. I prefer an asphalt aisle, but they are ok.
    Laurie
    Finding, preparing, showing and training young hunters, in hand and performance.
    www.juniorjohnsontrainingandsales.com



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb. 25, 2004
    Location
    DFW
    Posts
    334

    Default

    The pavers are beautiful but they are expensive a pain to sweep. Shavings stick in them like horse/cat/dog hair in a fleece jacket!

    We found some THICK rubber interlocking mats at Tractor Supply that work great in our smaller barn's 12' aisleway. They are black rubber with a subtle tire-tread type finish. They cover the aisleway and crossties wall-to-wall with some trimming, so they look like a one-piece floor.

    They haven't moved and inch or worn down at all since we installed them about 5 years ago. And they were MUCH cheaper than the rubber pavers.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct. 14, 2004
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    8,994

    Default

    Glad to hear it just isn't me or something I'm doing wrong to sweep these darn things clean...



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar. 9, 2004
    Posts
    2,772

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Huntertwo View Post
    I work at a barn that has rubber pavers. Very nice looking plus the footing is great.

    One downfall? They are a real pain in the arse to sweep or hose down.
    Possibly it could be the broom I use, but every bit of hay or shavings just fly around when swept.
    Blower!

    We have them in the barn aisle where I work, they're beautiful and a nice touch. No more horse shoes clacking on concrete. I don't find them hard to clean at all with a blower, though I do admit I would probably vacuum them out if I had the time & energy (which I don't!).
    "You can't blame other people. You can't always say what happened wasn't my fault, and you know what? Even if you have an excuse, shut up. "Bruce Davidson Sr.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 2005
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    1,368

    Default

    I used interlocking rubber mats in my alleyway. Best thing I did. No muss, no fuss, easy to use. Pavers look wonderful, but cost more. I needed function while trying to control costs.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar. 27, 2008
    Posts
    304

    Default

    Glad to hear about those mats, I think that's what I'm going to do in my barn



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Mar. 9, 2006
    Posts
    112

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Flash44 View Post
    I have them in my barn, and don't care if they are not spotless. They provide great traction both wet and dry, and I'm more concerned about safety than anything else. Be careful about what spills on them, though, I had some bubble when a pony got out and spilled either blue lotion or hoof oil on the floor and it sat there for a while.
    We have the interlocking mats with brick paver pattern. The culprit for the bubble would have been the hoof oil. We had some massibe bubbles when a loose horse at night overturned the mineral oil/sulfur bucket. We weren't sure if it was the suflur or the oil. After my four year old dumped a container of fly spray (oil based) on the floor that wasn't discovered until hours later, we had another bubble. Talked to the manufacturer and it is the oil that reacts, apparently with any rubber. We love the floor (and it has impressed many with it's non-slip properties), but keep oil based products stored well away from accidental spills.

    And yes, a blower is the only way to go to keep it looking clean quickly.



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