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  1. #21
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    I think in general bucking is a major evasion by a horse, almost as bad as balking/rearing, and shouldn't be tolerated; but there are these occasional "super happy baby bucks" horses do that are simple expressions of joy that occur that riders should be sort of? pleased their horse is having such a good time.



  2. #22
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    Default Depends on the reason

    Timely topic as this just happened to me yesterday.

    Due to the snow and lousy footing in the arena, I haven't been able to free longe my mare. Even though she has a decent sized paddock area, she still needs to run loose in the arena at least 2 a week to let off steam.

    Yesterday was the first time I rode in a few weeks and it was limited to a 2 acre field in front of our barn.

    Yes, she threw in a couple of bucks, mostly while standing still.., but it was not due to being a nasty pony. It was just pent up energy. I growled a bit and we continued to work and she settled down after about 15 minutes.

    If it was a nasty "I want you off my back, because I'm a #itch" kind of buck, then YES I certainly give her a good spanking.
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  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cherry View Post
    Happy, healthy, properly fed horses don't buck. If the horse bucks there is a reason for it. Find the reason, remove it and everyone benefits. Ignore the reason and it will continue until the horse generally needs to be put down.
    Geez, if that were true I'd have put my sweet wonderfully tempered, brave, honest, POA trail riding mare down years ago..
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  4. #24
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    It depends on the kind of buck.

    Happy bucks - well, maybe not, unless your rider is the kind of person who likes that. A lot of eventers and people who hunt like that. Generally, dressage people do not. But sometimes, well, sometimes you just land a jump and it feels so good, or you're just feeling good and you want to run, and a happy buck is kind of a gallop in place.

    Bucks because you hurt - YES. Because we are TRYING TO TELL YOU SOMETHING. We can't yell at you in your human language, so we have to speak up in Equus.
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  5. #25
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    Ditto to what yellowbritches said. When and where the horse buck are as much of a clue to why they're doing it as anything. There are definitely "wee that was fun!" bucks, "I'm in pain" bucks, and "I'm going to KILL YOU" bucks. How I respond totally depends on the situation and the horse.

    I had a horse I showed at the GP level for several years. He bucked after every good round we ever had. Never between fences, never while he was needed to "do his job," only after we crossed the timers and then typically he'd buck his way out of the ring (but ONLY if we went clean). He was chiropracted regularly and certainly not hurting or in need of an adjustment (which manifested itself in other ways with him). He was a quirky guy and kind of an ass (okay, "kinda" is a bit of an understatement ), but that was his thing, and I enjoyed it. I certainly never got after him for it. Who knows, he was smart as anything and he may have just figured out that I wasn't going to get after him moments after a brilliant round (bucking didn't fly any other time). That being said, I also didn't reward him for it.

    A horse doing a "try to get the rider OFF" buck is a different story. I have a zero tolerance policy for mine when they buck as an evasion or in a way that's aimed at unseating me. But I don't mind the occasional hop after a particlarly big jumping effort (I still reprimand, but not as seriously).

    So I guess the bottom line is that it depends on the horse and the situation. I don't think your friend is necessarily wrong in thinking that her horse is bucking out of enjoyment (more likely not, as many others have answered), but I do think she's wrong in how she deals with it. When my horses buck after a jump I either reprimand or ignore it if I have to get my balance back and miss the opportunity to make it a lesson to the horse. I agree that petting a horse after bucking sends the wrong message, and DEFINITELY in a horse that's going to be up for sale.



  6. #26
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    I do not think it is "acceptable" as it shows defiance, not necessarily happiness. Bucking in the pasture while playing may show happiness..bucking under saddle may be pain. I had the same problem with my horse. He was bucking under saddle at the canter. Not violent, but enough to cause concern. I had the vet do a lameness test and he tested positive on both hind legs. We did x-rays and the proof was in the picture...he had osteoarthritis in both hocks. He is now on Naproxen five days a week to minimize the inflimation and will be getting hock injections soon. He is a much happier horse...no more bucking.



  7. #27
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    Depends on the reason for the buck. Jet will occasionally buck if he's feeling good, or if he jumps really big over something. If I miss a distance horribly, and he has to bail me out, I pay for it when we land...he'll launch himself into the air and do several bucks in a row. Fortunately, he stays straight when he does that so it's pretty easy to sit up and get him back.

    I don't mind the feel good bucks. Now if a horse bucks as an evasion, as in, you ask him to go forward, and they get pissy and buck, or if they are trying to get you off, that's different.
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  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bluey View Post
    For every example of a horse that could do well, even with bucking or kicking out while on course, there are many that didn't make it.

    I have had the dubious pleasure of retraining many horses someone started and then was afraid of them, because they let them buck.
    That is like letting them "nip a little" and expect them to know what is ok and when it is not ok to take a bite of you or someone else.
    I know a lady that ended up in the hospital from their stallion that "only nipped a little", until he took a big bite.

    Yes, there will be a time here and there a horse may catch you by surprise and buck, but if you ride them carefully and well, that should not happen but rarely.

    Better not to get in those situations where a horse will "just give a few bucks", because bucking is like dancing, the more a horse practices it, the better and more athletic they get at it.
    I sure hope that your skills at riding bucking horses also advance right along with those of your horse to buck better and better.
    Good post.

    I consider it unacceptable and dangerous behavior. When I was young (teenager), I had a horse that bucked often. I didn't know how to correct it, and just rode it out. That was 40 years ago - I'm much too old for that sort of thing now.

    Bucking can be corrected.

    My filly started off bucking, but it was corrected, in part-by shortening the distance between the trot and the canter and, in part, by a trainer (Jerry Tindell), roping her around the flanks and lunging her. She bucked at bit at that time, but stopped, and continued lunging w/o incident. There is more to it than that, and it's not something to do w/o the help of a good trainer, but can be corrected.



  9. #29
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    A horse does really not, as someone said, become an automaton because it is not permitted to stall and go to bucking with you, no matter what reason or none they have.

    I would say that, just as people are not supposed to swear and hit others just because they feel like it or are mad at them, horses when handled or ridden are not supposed to buck, rear, kick, bite or any other such behaviors that can be dangerous for the people involved.

    It is called having learned good manners.

    Self restrain is what being educated in social manners is.
    People and horses can express themselves without needing to act up, if we listen to them.



  10. #30
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    I had a mare that lovedlovedLOVED to jump. Sometimes, after a line, she would buck. I was never in danger of being even unbalanced, and would laugh out loud. a horse that's having FUN is the ULTIMATE, for ME.



  11. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cherry View Post
    Happy, healthy, properly fed horses don't buck. If the horse bucks there is a reason for it. Find the reason, remove it and everyone benefits. Ignore the reason and it will continue until the horse generally needs to be put down.
    Come on!!!! Seriously??!?!?!?! I must have a lot of unhappy, unhealthy, poorly fed horses on our property because our horses love to frolic and play in turnout...
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  12. #32
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    I would say that, just as people are not supposed to swear and hit others just because they feel like it or are mad at them, horses when handled or ridden are not supposed to buck, rear, kick, bite or any other such behaviors that can be dangerous for the people involved.
    I don't consider the OCCASIONAL wee buck on the same level as swearing or hitting somebody, but more like a big, loud, obnoxious laugh or "Woohoo!!" when something very funny or cool happens. Like the obnoxious guy I sat next to in a bar in Chicago...he was very animated and excited over the basketball game he was watching. It was kinda funny (because he was making an ass of himself), but also obnoxious, but I wasn't about to call him out on it. That's pretty much how I look at a wee buck. Now, if he was sitting there and calling me names and trying to punch me, then we'd have an issue...that's how I look at an aggressive, mean buck.

    And when I say OCCASIONAL, I mean once in a blue moon kinda occasional, not once a week, or once month, and definitely not once a day. The horses that have done this to me on occasion have never turned into nasty buckers...most have grown out of it as they've matured. Also, when I say wee bucks they are both "weeeee!!!" and wee, as in, not very big, crow hoppy type things, not bronc bucks (coughcough, Paco).



  13. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Serah View Post
    Come on!!!! Seriously??!?!?!?! I must have a lot of unhappy, unhealthy, poorly fed horses on our property because our horses love to frolic and play in turnout...
    Horses on their own time is different than when around people or at work.
    Different rules apply when horses play with horses or people.
    People can be injured by horse play.



  14. #34
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    Default I enjoy it!!

    I love when my boy throws a good buck! He’s fluid & athletic and I find him easy to sit. It’s only one buck now and then, which tells me that I have my horse feeling well in himself and happy to be out and about enjoying his life.
    "Dressage" is just a fancy word for flatwork



  15. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Creaghgal View Post
    I love when my boy throws a good buck! He’s fluid & athletic and I find him easy to sit. It’s only one buck now and then, which tells me that I have my horse feeling well in himself and happy to be out and about enjoying his life.
    Careful! That means he is at death's door! If I were you I'd start digging the hole right now...





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  16. #36
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    Originally Posted by Cherry http://www.chronicleforums.com/Forum...s/viewpost.gif
    Happy, healthy, properly fed horses don't buck. If the horse bucks there is a reason for it. Find the reason, remove it and everyone benefits. Ignore the reason and it will continue until the horse generally needs to be put down.
    I'm thinking that you meant to say laid down, as on it's side, on the footing, a very typical cowboy practice.
    "The best thing for the inside of a man is the outside of a horse" Lord Palmerston



  17. #37
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    Party Rose, I meant euthanized!

    Look, there's a big difference between a horse bucking in the pasture and one bucking when ridden.

    My mare acted like a maniac when put out on pasture--ran and bucked and reared! She may have even wanted to buck a time or two when being ridden but I was proactive and it never came to fruition. I would never put up with a horse that wanted to buck on a continual basis under saddle.

    What parent wants to put their child on a horse that would continually challenge the kid and possibly put the child in the hospital? The horse may get passed around but chances are that it will end up being put down or sent to a sale where it will end up at slaughter because no one bothered to check to see if the bucking was a physical problem or a training problem. And sometimes it is, as Bluey said, a learned behavior--maybe it gets them out of work temporarily. Horses really are not as dumb as they appear!

    There are far too many horses whose bad behavior is tolerated because the owners don't realize it is not acceptable. I don't find rearing acceptable either.
    Let go or be dragged.~ American proverb



  18. #38
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    Well good thing Cherry doesn't own my GP dressage mare. (Originally Posted by Cherry:
    "Happy, healthy, properly fed horses don't buck. If the horse bucks there is a reason for it. Find the reason, remove it and everyone benefits. Ignore the reason and it will continue until the horse generally needs to be put down.")

    When Sally is feeling good and a little "up," sometimes the first canter depart she throws in a buck and a head shake. I just laugh and we go to work. She isn't trying to get rid of me, she isn't dangerous and, god forbid, she should never be put down. That would be absolutely ridiculous! I know the difference between bucks and when she does this in no way does it mean she is not happy, healthy or property fed. Wowza, what a generality!
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  19. #39

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    Depends on the horse, quite honestly. I rode 4 rank, seldom used, green, nasty, clever SMALL ponies (I'm 5ft and 70lbs, and they were maybe 11-12.2hh, maybe smaller) while I was in Kauai for an extended amount of time. No one was small enough to ride them but me, so they weren't ridden for god-knows-how-long, but when I got on them, I expected them to buck. (Literally, WHEN AND WHILE I got on them, LOL!) I expected them to be cranky. I always rode them bareback (no saddles small enough), but I had no problems sitting their bucks, and just continued on with training them. One was a real rodeo bucker and sometimes nap/rearer - he would scrape kids off on fences, buck everyone off, etc, the others bucked, but were more for bolting. I got to know what to expect for each horse. I would prefer a pony to buck than to rear. When they bucked, I just sat it, cuffed em with my leg, drove them forward, and got on with it. I picked my battles.

    With my young anglo gelding on the other hand, if he bucks, I make him work his ass off. He is young and ridden often and not set in his ways and has no excuse. And he can occasionally be ridden by other people. My problem with his the arab teleport and spook gallop bolt, and he rarely offers a buck.

    I certainly do not reward bucking, but my reaction depending on the horse varies. With my gelding I would make it a big deal and make sure he would never do it again, with the ponies, it's business as usual, I'll reprimand them but not micromanage, as I have more serious problems. :P

    As for bucking on the lunge... My gelding tends to pull away when I lunge him and try to rip it out of my hands. He cannot do wild-crazy bucks that end up affecting ME on the other end of the line, but if he wants to crowhop while staying straight and not pulling on me, when the weather's cold and he's fresh, that's just fine.



  20. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by joharavhf View Post
    Bucking is not acceptable. But it's better than rearing.
    Amen that!



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