The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 21
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan. 11, 2008
    Location
    Windsor SC till Aug
    Posts
    1,410

    Default Weighting the right seat bone...

    I just had a baby in Oct and i'm back in the saddle finally... Starting slow because my horses and i are so out of shape. But i've been having an issue, cant make it to get any lessons right now due to vehicle issues, dont want to get too much further and develop this "bad habit" even more...

    So... I need some suggestions. I seem to have lost my right seat bone. All of my weight is shifting into my left side. Much more evident when going to the right and extremely evident on my sensitive Irish/TB at the canter when he constantly swaps leads. I'm doing some two point to help me get some more balance back, i'm hoping that helps get my weight shifted more evenly side to side... But do you guys have more tips, tricks, and suggestions for getting this issue fixed? I'm not real comfortable going without stirrups just yet, my horses have been quite fresh... As soon as we get a little more settled, i'll work on some no stirrup work.

    Thanks in advance!



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov. 26, 2006
    Posts
    398

    Default

    I have the same problem, and since I haven't been able to ride lately I've been experimenting in my chair. The first thing seems to be to sort of shift my weight completely sideways (to the right) without leaning- just sort of take my chest horizontally to the right. Then I try to think about expanding my body upward from my right seatbone. Basically I want to PUSH up from my right seatbone and push my shoulder higher and straighten my body from that right seatbone on up. It feels to me like the pressure in my right seatbone increases if I do this. No idea how it will feel on a horse yet though.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    May. 12, 2001
    Location
    DC
    Posts
    1,638

    Default

    Maybe try “chair scoots”? Sit on a rolling chair (big exercise ball would be better on carpet) and use your seatbone with a just little leg to move yourself across the floor, or perhaps just use your seatbone to make circles going different directions. Make sure to do this occasionally with your left seatbone so you don't inadvertently make your right much stronger.
    Snobbington Hunt clique - Whoopee Wagon Fieldmaster
    Bostonians, join us at- http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Boston_Equestrian
    NYC Equestrians- http://sports.groups.yahoo.com/group/urbanequestrian/



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct. 17, 2005
    Location
    IN
    Posts
    583

    Default

    If it's more prominent when traveling to the right I would counterbend him a bit in that direction to get his body even underneath you. Really get him to move his left side back over with your outside leg, when you go through a corner push him away from it instead of letting him fall into it, and on the long side you could think a little leg yield to straighten him out. You could play around with that at the walk before moving to the trot.

    If I really need to get funky with my position to keep it straighter than the horse's, I lift one seat bone in order to weight the other. In your case, lift your left seat bone with the side of your stomach, literally pull the seat bone straight up, just an inch or two though. Hold that position while your trying to get your horse straight and then go back to normal. Really though, I see something like that lasting for just a few strides because getting the horse straight is usually the real issue.
    Last edited by A Horse of Course; Dec. 26, 2008 at 03:01 PM.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun. 13, 2001
    Location
    usa
    Posts
    6,123

    Default

    Remember to KEEP CHANGING which hip you carry the kiddie on. That habit rakes havoc on the eveness of the seat (I have seen this repeatedly).
    I.D.E.A. yoda



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb. 7, 2007
    Posts
    1,396

    Default

    I have had the same problem my entire life. What helped me was two things. The first was to just get overall stronger, which cannot be done on horseback. After I started going to the gym, the problem improved. The second is to think about it ALL THE TIME - especially in the car. If I'm at the computer, I'm sitting on my right seat bone. Eating at the dinner table, I'm sitting on my right seatbone. Buit I think it was the gym that helped the most.

    Good luck.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov. 9, 2005
    Location
    uk
    Posts
    15,268

    Default

    ride without stirrups and learn to use your seat indenedantly off your hands and legs



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan. 11, 2008
    Location
    Windsor SC till Aug
    Posts
    1,410

    Default

    I'm not comfortable going with no stirrups yet as stated in my original post. My horses have been silly monsters... Cant blame them, they've been off all year. I cant afford to have broken limbs with a 2 month old baby though... Stirrups are staying for a little while until the beasts calm down and get their brains back in their heads...

    I didnt even think about when i'm carying the baby, i do always pick him up on the left. I'll make sure to remember to switch that up. I've also been thinking about which seat bone always takes more weight when i'm sitting, and its almost always the left... So i need to remember that too.

    I'm sure its a straightening issue with my horses right now too. Both have always been worse to the right and after having the year off, it sure hasnt improved! I'm starting out fairly slow with them, one is very unbalanced so we are doing HUGE circles, 25m or larger and straight lines as smaller than that she is not ready for... The other is much better, but i sure cant take them deep into corners or anything! Its going to take the three of us a long time i'm afraid. Just hoping we get it together before spring so we can hit some schooling shows at least!

    Super ideas! Thanks all!



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar. 16, 2003
    Location
    Wet and Windy Washington
    Posts
    3,784

    Default

    BFZ- I will second and third what Ideayoda said- be very careful with your body mechanics with the baby and in general, a small change makes a huge difference in the saddle!~

    I had difficulty weight my right seatbone and my horse is stiffer that side too which didn't help. Went to my chiro and had a light bulb moment I carry my wallet in my right back pocket the whole time. Hence that hip is lifted when I sit and drive...VIOLA! Now I make an effort when I sit and drive to sit square.

    GL!
    I have horse to sell to you. Horse good for riding. Can pull cart. Horse good size. Eats carrots and apples. Likes attention. Move head to music. No like opera! You like you buy.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct. 4, 2003
    Location
    Hurdle Mills, NC
    Posts
    4,109

    Default

    Stick a tennis ball in the triangle between your 2 seat bones and your pubic bone while driving your car, and practice "finding" the ball with your choice of bones while you drive. if you experiment enough, you will learn to lift, drop and otherwise move your seatbones at will.

    I was taught this by my Alexander Technique instructor and was very surprised by what I learned: my old attempts to drop one or the other seatbone actually had the opposite effect !!! My horses and I have been getting along much better since I "literally" learned what I was doing.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan. 31, 2003
    Posts
    18,472

    Default

    Amongst the other good suggestions here - pull your right leg OFF the horse from the hip. Pull it OUT away from the horse, not back, and don't pull your leg UP. Just straight out. Rinse and repeat and see if you don't get a glimmer of where the seatbone has gone to.

    The other thing that can help is envisioning the long muscles running down their back and picking one seatbone and putting it on the muscle. Most people can only put one on at at time until they get really good at it. The good news is, you can ride pretty well w/just one but really, your goal should be two. Sometimes I think the difference between good and great is two.
    "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
    ---
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep. 17, 2003
    Location
    Howell, Michigan
    Posts
    455

    Smile

    I just had my trainer fix that issue. The problem was that I was keeping my right (inside) leg behind the girth. When I worked on keeping my inside right (inside) leg in front of the girth, my right seat bone naturally came down.

    When you first start modifying your leg position it will feel like you are pushing your leg way too far forward. After time it will start to feel normal. You will know when it is right by how your seat feels.

    Enjoy



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan. 13, 2003
    Posts
    6,829

    Default

    Lift your right shoulder. You are probably collapsing on that side which puts more weight on the left seat bone.
    Summit Sporthorses Ltd. Inc.
    "Breeding Competition Partners & Lifelong Friends"



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2000
    Posts
    24,408

    Default

    Lift your right hand up in the air, straight over your head. You may be collapsing your right side.

    Most horses are 'uneven' and don't give you an even back to sit on unless a lot of straightening work is done with them. When you and they are out of shape it is more obvious.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov. 26, 2006
    Posts
    398

    Default

    Rats... I always carry my kid on the same side and he is getting HEAVY...
    I get too tired when I put him on the other side though- I always carry him on my left side.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Apr. 4, 2001
    Location
    gr pr, alberta,
    Posts
    2,026

    Default

    hmmm... do lots and lots of stretching (you may have to find a suitable horse of course )

    - bring both knees up into the jockey position, then straighten the leg, then pull your ankle to your bum (being sure you're still sitting on both seat bones) This can be done at all gaits.

    I tried a few things like dropping one stirrup, and having someone ride behind me to stay on me about sittin in both seat bones.

    Good luck, and hope you can find an acceptable horse to do some longe work/stretches!
    Carol and Princess Dewi

    **~Doccer'sDressage~**



  17. #17
    Join Date
    May. 12, 2001
    Location
    DC
    Posts
    1,638

    Default

    One of my trainers used to have me do this at the start of the lesson to "find your seatbones":

    Take your feet out of the stirrups and bring your legs straight out to the sides like you’re doing the splits. Then bring both legs in front of the saddle so that your knees are framing the withers, wriggle your lower legs a little. Return feet to proper position in stirrups. Throughout this, take note of how your seatbones are positioned in the saddle and that they’re pressing evenly on both sides.

    Of course, you want to do this when your horse is calm or someone is holding it Don’t ask me how it works, but it does help me to sit more evenly.
    Snobbington Hunt clique - Whoopee Wagon Fieldmaster
    Bostonians, join us at- http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Boston_Equestrian
    NYC Equestrians- http://sports.groups.yahoo.com/group/urbanequestrian/



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Oct. 4, 2003
    Location
    Hurdle Mills, NC
    Posts
    4,109

    Default

    Riding ("jockey style) with your knees up in front of the saddle, feet framing the horse's shoulders, is, indeed, a great way to find your seatbones-- and, I might add, learning to ride with them. As doccer says, this can be done at all three gaits. You may be surprised to discover how well your horse goes off those seatbones alone once you've gotten control of them. As slc's recommendation suggests, however, controlling the seatbones often involves "fixing"/aligning/rebalancing everything from there up because its the weight of that which goes through the seatbones to the horse's back.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jan. 25, 2008
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    141

    Default

    Congrats on your baby -- and for getting back in the saddle.

    I don't know that this is the best answer but it is one that has not been offered yet. I picked up Tina Sederholm's book recently and she has an exercise to address this. Hope the link works...if not do the Google book preview for Unlock Your Riding Talent and go to page 28 and read the exercise on riding with one stirrup shorter than the other. Maybe it can be of some use until you can get back into the no stirrup work groove. Good luck and best wishes.

    http://books.google.com/books?id=i9L...lm%22#PPA28,M1



  20. #20
    Join Date
    May. 9, 2008
    Location
    Johannesburg
    Posts
    518

    Default

    Congratulations on your baby.

    First thing I'd do is go to a chiro / physio and make sure that you are straight. Pregnancy and natural childbirth, and carrying a child on your hip for a while, are going to mean that your muscles will develop unevenly. You will be fighting an uphill battle if you don't get some treatment for that.

    Secondly, I strongly suggest pilates or some core muscle training, which will strengthen the muscles which pregnancy stretched and weakened. That will help to stabilise you on your horse.

    Good luck.



Similar Threads

  1. Rider's (R) Seat Bone ... Pain
    By SusieQue in forum Off Course
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: Mar. 17, 2012, 10:56 PM
  2. Seat-bone area on Saddle!
    By Reiter in forum Dressage
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: Sep. 8, 2011, 05:27 PM
  3. Replies: 28
    Last Post: Apr. 29, 2011, 08:13 PM
  4. Splint Bone/Fetlock Bone chip Removal after effects ~
    By LuvThoseKhemos in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 37
    Last Post: Feb. 21, 2010, 05:18 PM
  5. 'Weighting' the rear tires of 4wd Kubota???
    By Hunter's Rest in forum Around The Farm
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: Dec. 24, 2009, 07:22 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness