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  1. #1
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    Jan. 7, 2008
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    Default Invisible Fencing Around Horse Fencing

    I was wondering what experiences people have had with the invisible fencing for dogs around the perimeter of a horse farm. I am contemplating putting in invisible fencing around our entire property along our horse fencing to keep our dogs from going into the neighbor's pastures or getting out on the road. I've never used invisible fencing for my dogs and was wondering if any of you have it on your horse properties for your dogs. Thank you for any information and experiences you can share.



  2. #2
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    Mar. 9, 2006
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    My barn owner successfully used invisible fencing to contain a couple of her dogs for a while. She strung the wire up on the regular horse fencing, so it wasn't exactly invisible. She had a heavy duty model and was able to run a few thousand feet around several acres of pasture. Eventually the fence stopped working due to wear and tear: horses chewing on the wire, humans tripping over it as they went through gates, rain getting in and corroding the splices, etc. We've lost a couple of transformers due to lightning strikes too. Next summer we're probably going to have to redo the whole system; right now keeping the horses contained as storm weakened trees take down the pasture fences is a higher priority.



  3. #3
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    Sep. 8, 1999
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    If you install it correctly (bury it), train your dogs to it, keep the batteries fresh and not break it while plowing--the Invisible Fence will be the best thing you ever do to protect your dogs and make your life easier.
    \"I refuse to engage in a battle of wits with someone who is unarmed.\"--Pogo



  4. #4
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    Aug. 25, 2007
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    A good fence does two jobs:

    It keeps something in.

    It keeps everything else out.

    "Invisible fencing" by definition can only do half of a good fence's job, making is not such a good fence.

    Save your money and teach your dogs to respect you fence lines.

    G.



  5. #5
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    Jan. 7, 2008
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    Default

    Thank you for the inputs on invisible fencing pros and cons. Our puppies are 8 months old and are doing very well with their training but I absolutely do not want to take a chance of one possibly getting near the road or adventuring into another neighbor's pasture. So far so good. But I was interested in the invisible fencing for piece of mind if for some reason my attention is taken away from the dogs when they are out since they are never out without my supervision at this point in their young lives. These are my future working dogs and will not be left alone outside. I just would like to know who has it and do they like it or not and what have been your experiences with invisible fencing. Did you put it in yourself or did you have the company do it? Again thank you for any input.



  6. #6
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    Jul. 28, 2004
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    Invisible fencing won't keep other animals out. It would be good for letting your dogs roam the property while you're outside, but I wouldn't leave them unsupervised. You never know what might wander over.

    My neighbors lab is pregnant because she keeps her in with an invisible fence. The poor pup isn't anywhere near old enough to be having puppies herself.



  7. #7
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    Jan. 7, 2008
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    USA
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    Default

    I totally agree that when you have an invisible fence one should be very careful to watch their dogs when they are outside because it does not keep other things from wandering into the boundaries. My main concern is to make sure my puppies never get near the road. They are coming along with their training but one of the pups has "ADD" at times and there is no stopping him when he's on the run and it can be very scary and I can't run fast enough if he were to go towards the road. So I'm looking at this as a piece of mind while they are growing up and going through their training.



  8. #8
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    Aug. 25, 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by veezee View Post
    I totally agree that when you have an invisible fence one should be very careful to watch their dogs when they are outside because it does not keep other things from wandering into the boundaries. My main concern is to make sure my puppies never get near the road. They are coming along with their training but one of the pups has "ADD" at times and there is no stopping him when he's on the run and it can be very scary and I can't run fast enough if he were to go towards the road. So I'm looking at this as a piece of mind while they are growing up and going through their training.
    The "invisible fence" may or may not meet your needs. We had a tennant that put it up and put the collars on her Whippets. They would cheerfully run through that fence without even slowing down if they were "on the chase." I understand that others have had similar experiences with dogs that build up a "full head of steam" before they come within the influence of the fence.

    If they were just "piddling around" the fence was effective.

    A physical barrier will meet your needs and perform both jobs.

    Good luck in your choice.

    G.



  9. #9
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    Well unfortunately a physical barrier would mean more than a 5 acre perimeter of at least a six foot tall solid fence.



  10. #10
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    Nov. 26, 2003
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    NE FL
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    We did it. We have our whole 5 ac perimeter and cross fenced with no climb with top rail and pipe gates. We have 10 dogs, all large breeds, a couple are labs and one is a rottie.

    The reason we got the invisible fence to back it up was because one dog would actually jump over the fence (4'-wish my horse could jump as well as my dog) and a couple of them would scoot out if someone opened the gate to come in.

    We secured the invisible fence to the no climb with small zip ties about four squares up from the bottom, and then used a section of that gray electrical pvc stuff to bury it under the gates and so on.

    Initially we had buried it, but that took a lot longer and was a real pain whenever there was a break in it to find it and fix it. This way we can just walk around the fence line and check it.

    Just make sure you get the right size transmitter for the amount of property you have, and put as few splices in the fence as you can. Also don't make sharp corners in the wire.

    We have no problem with any of the dogs even when the gate is open, they learned real fast about the fence. We are very happy with it.

    We did have it in our other house, with no other fence. Don't leave them out without you, don't count on it is what I'm saying, because they will run through it if sufficiently motivated (like working dogs or houndbreeds especially).
    "Perhaps the final test of anybody's love of dogs is their willingness to permit them to make a camping ground of the bed" -Henry T. Merwin



  11. #11
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    Mar. 9, 2006
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    One thing to add about my barn owner's setup is that her regular horse fencing is no climb fencing (she needs to contain minis and goats as well as the full sized horses.) This fencing will restrain larger dogs such as shepherds and collies. However, the little dogs, the terrier and beagle types, will tunnel under, wiggle through, or else climb over no climb fencing. (I guess they didn't read the part about the fencing being no climb.) They can be quite persistent about finding escape routes. Having the invisible fencing running along the no climb fencing stops this Count of Monte Cristo routine; the little dogs don't care to spend all afternoon probing the fence to find a weakness. The invisible fencing also keeps the younger dogs from shooting between our legs when we open gates.



  12. #12
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    Mar. 26, 2007
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    SE PA
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    If you do decide to bury it, make sure you bury it OUTSIDE the pasture. My parents bought a farm with invisible fence pre-installed, and part of it goes through one of the pastures. When the ground gets soft/muddy and the horses track over the spot where the fence is, it breaks very easily.
    RIP Victor... I'll miss you, you big galumph.



  13. #13

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    We have it and love it!!! We put in our training time with our dogs and have succesfully used it for years in and around horse fencing. I would highly recomend the product. Be sure to use high quality equipment. I believe "The Invisible Fence" is trademarked and we have used that specific brand now at three of our houses. We have 2 terriers and a Bernese Mountain dog. Good luck!



  14. #14
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    Aug. 25, 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by veezee View Post
    Well unfortunately a physical barrier would mean more than a 5 acre perimeter of at least a six foot tall solid fence.
    Why?

    Start with a small area for training and "turnout." When they learn to respect the limits (with training and maturity) then you can enlarge the area.

    G.



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