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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep. 23, 2007
    Location
    Windsor, PA
    Posts
    366

    Default Can't wait for hunting season to be over *long rant*

    I don't know about everyone else but I consider myself lucky each year when we make it thru a hunting season without any of our animals getting shot. The people around me are what you would consider "rough" you know the type that say “you don't own your land god does” and “we were here before you built your house there”, they fly the rebel flag have less than 6 teeth, etc... Guess that’s how we got our land so cheap... Anyway, I take the first whole week off the day deer season starts just to keep an eye on things on our property, this year has been nerve wracking! Last year we had underage juveniles wearing all camo walking thru my fields & woods to flush the deer out to their older brother. This year the same kids shot into a house then claimed the box of bullets states the bullet only goes so many ft. - UH no you dumb @$$ that's feet per second! Then neighbor puts his tree stand right on our property line even though he's within our safety zone and says he's only going to use a bow and shoot away from our property line, yeah right, saw him going up there with a gun the other day & then when he saw me and realized I saw the gun he left, so had I not been around he would’ve been up there with a gun?! Now it's not even safe to use our riding ring up in the woods, I feel like a prisoner on our own farm, this has royally sucked! Then last but not least, this weekend a man is in the middle of field behind our property facing our barns & house with a high power rifle, so my husband goes to talk with him and he said he has permission to hunt on the land behind our farm, okay all well and good but this drunk, yes he was drunk didn't understand that you can NOT shoot into a safety zone (our property). He claims he knows where all our buildings are and animals that he'd aim away from them. I could just scream, I swear any @$$hole can go to Walmart & get a gun & license anymore. When I was a kid I took the hunter safety course and was brought up very educated about rules, regulations and gun safety. It's not like I'm anti hunting, my husband is an avid hunter, but he doesn't even hunt at our farm, it's just not safe because of nearby houses. Is it too much to ask that people just respect our property lines and keep away from our animals. We try to keep to ourselves and not bother anyone but it’s getting hard to do that. I'm afraid to pi$$ these crazy people off in fear that they'll do something to our animals. The other night I couldn't even get our horses to come in to eat which is highly unusual, they were all stressed out about something. Here I find out from our neighbor that they're was a man right behind our barn hunting and there were shots?! WTF!!! So far the game commission has been less than helpful, so I guess soon I’ll have to get local police involved. It’s hard to get the proof I need to show the game commission so I’ve been carrying my camera with me, but I wonder how the trespasser is going to take it when I ask them to turn around so I can get their license number. And by the time the game commission can get here they’re gone. Sigh, I feel like it's a losing battle, well thanks for listening to me rant & rave...Can't wait for hunting to be over, oh tis the season



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2007
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    10,071

    Default

    Well, leaving aside my feeling about building more houses in the country--call the DNR on these people (or whatever your equivalent is.) Also the police, as people crossing your land are tresspassing. Teh camera's a good idea--there's nothing they can do without documentation but it sounds like these people are around plenty long enough for you to get some! We were lucky--the last time someone fired in the wrong direction, not only did my dad go up the road to investigate, the local DNR office just happened to be driving by. (Nice timing, buddy!)

    Heh. Another thing that helps--the guys we let hunt our front forty? State police officers.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct. 24, 2007
    Location
    Warsaw, On
    Posts
    459

    Default

    Hum...I've taken the hunter safety course as well. I think it's much easier to get guns in your neck of the woods, but the way I see it is this: Someone is going to be hunting on your land...whether you like it or not. You are far better to give permission to a responsible hunter and know they are there and following the rules than to give no one permission. If no one has permission, the locals will be free to do as they please. A responsible hunter can help keep an eye on things and the riff raff will tend to stay away if someone else is hunting. This is how I control the hunting on my own 100 acres. Just a FYI.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr. 29, 2005
    Location
    Paris, Kentucky
    Posts
    3,195

    Default

    We had this problem a couple of years ago. I sicced my 108# Black German Shep on some unwelcome hunters and told them in no uncertain terms that I would shoot anyone that harmed the dog. They left in a cloud of dirt road dust.

    I heard later at the CoOp that I am known as the lady with the Crazy Dog. I haven't bothered to tell anyone there that he died 2 years ago of a brain tumor.
    Holly
    www.ironhorsefrm.com
    Oldenburg foals and young prospects
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  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar. 8, 2005
    Location
    Millstone, NJ
    Posts
    445

    Default

    Last year i was teaching one of my very small students on my large pony. He is generally a great pony, BUT that day we had some @sshat run along my fence line (on my property) to flush the deer.

    I live on 5 acres. there are houses on either side of me, with 2-5 acres. Behind me is another farmette who's land reaches another street (mine goes to a different one. the two meet in a T but that's a 1/4 mile away) hope that made sense.

    So the guy is chasing the deer on my property (we are surrounded by trees and have about 2 acres btw me and my neighbor that is all fenced and my mom feeds the deer).

    I had to grab my pony to make certain that he wouldnt spook, and we watched this happen. If i hadnt, i would have i dunno thrown something at the guy.

    Minutes later as the herd of 20 deer split and either went to the farm on the left of me, or across my neighbors from property, over a pretty busy street (also spooking his boarders' horse to book (thankfully) toward my horses and not across the street..he was hand grazing..)

    Commence slaughter. And no i have no problem when it's hunting...tracking..going to find the deer. Not having someone chase them so you can line up and shoot as many as you can as they run in front of you. And yes there are houses on either side of the street.

    My parents called the cops over it and he said that it's only illegal if they are caught on your poprty. They can lose their hunting lisence. And can get in trouble for trespassing. The farm and game people that are located in the huge park that hunting is legal in, were no help. Even the sending the deer across a busy minor highway and causing accidents? they wouldnt get in trouble. Which i think is stupid. But i know i am allowed to (if it ever happens again) to jump the fence and knock the guy down and hog tie him.

    It also helped that my mom kept going on and on about my student and that i was teaching and how the horse could have spooked and hurt my student and what not.

    VERY frustrating.

    I would go with the cops, as they can tell you more of your legal rights. We had to put up "no trespassing on the boarder of out property.

    it sucks winter can't be done soon enough.

    :-)
    Jen
    www.rivendellhorsefarm.com



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct. 27, 2008
    Location
    Zone 7
    Posts
    258

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Iron Horse Farm View Post
    We had this problem a couple of years ago. I sicced my 108# Black German Shep on some unwelcome hunters and told them in no uncertain terms that I would shoot anyone that harmed the dog. They left in a cloud of dirt road dust.

    I heard later at the CoOp that I am known as the lady with the Crazy Dog. I haven't bothered to tell anyone there that he died 2 years ago of a brain tumor.
    Except I knew a family with a similar story and they shot the dog



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug. 9, 2007
    Posts
    8,914

    Default

    My home state of Georgia is bad enough with the crazy hunters who think they should shoot at everything that moves, including other hunters who are wearing orange.

    But I do have to say that Pennsylvania is worse than Georgia. I lived in PA for a while, and it was crazy. Plus any dog running loose in the area I lived in got shot, because they were considered a threat to the deer that were for hunters only, apparently.

    Best to keep horses in in deer season, post property prolifically, and get a reputation as a person who will protect your property and aninals by any means necessary.

    And I did grow up in a hunting family but my father hunted on private land, didn't use dogs for anything other than birds, didn't use stands, didn't drink while hunting and never shot at anything that he couldn't tell was a deer/duck/dove/quail.

    And my 2 horses were stabled by a "sporting clays" gun club, not a hunting club, for over 3 yrs so they were not gunshy when at another barn someone killed a deer right by the pasture, and left it to die while another horse went beserk.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct. 18, 2000
    Posts
    22,379

    Default

    That's odd because based on your description I can think of several basic game regs that these people broke, not to mention laws.

    It's a shame - people like that don't deserve to be called hunters. They're poachers. Criminals. I hunt, and allow hunting on my small farm. I'd rather have needles stuck in my eyes than cause a fellow citizen any distress.

    Often responding to these calls is difficult because the game warden is responsible for enforcing game law and regs. But there are only a few for the entire state, so local law enforcement may be called. But they may not want to deal with it so it keeps going back and forth. Meanwhile, the landowners just wants law enforcement to respond.

    And poachers know that enforcement is almost impossible and they take advantage of it. Giving all lawful hunters a black eye. It really pisses me off.

    If you're having trouble with poachers, or issues with a certain type of hunting, sometimes you can work with your game department and local law enforcement to iron things out. Whether increased vigilance, working with a local club to iron out problems (not mounted foxhunting necessarily but many hunters belong to hunt clubs), or even having the game department moderate disputes between landowners and hunters.

    It requires time and effort, but from what I know of such things in my own state, the response has been positive.

    I've not had problems with poachers on my land, but I did have trouble with trespassers. The best defense is allowing someone to hunt on your land - they'll keep watch over your land for you.

    Sorry for everyone's troubles.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rivendell Horses View Post
    Last year i was teaching one of my very small students on my large pony. He is generally a great pony, BUT that day we had some @sshat run along my fence line (on my property) to flush the deer.

    I live on 5 acres. there are houses on either side of me, with 2-5 acres. Behind me is another farmette who's land reaches another street (mine goes to a different one. the two meet in a T but that's a 1/4 mile away) hope that made sense.

    So the guy is chasing the deer on my property (we are surrounded by trees and have about 2 acres btw me and my neighbor that is all fenced and my mom feeds the deer).

    I had to grab my pony to make certain that he wouldnt spook, and we watched this happen. If i hadnt, i would have i dunno thrown something at the guy.

    Minutes later as the herd of 20 deer split and either went to the farm on the left of me, or across my neighbors from property, over a pretty busy street (also spooking his boarders' horse to book (thankfully) toward my horses and not across the street..he was hand grazing..)

    Commence slaughter. And no i have no problem when it's hunting...tracking..going to find the deer. Not having someone chase them so you can line up and shoot as many as you can as they run in front of you. And yes there are houses on either side of the street.

    My parents called the cops over it and he said that it's only illegal if they are caught on your poprty. They can lose their hunting lisence. And can get in trouble for trespassing. The farm and game people that are located in the huge park that hunting is legal in, were no help. Even the sending the deer across a busy minor highway and causing accidents? they wouldnt get in trouble. Which i think is stupid. But i know i am allowed to (if it ever happens again) to jump the fence and knock the guy down and hog tie him.

    It also helped that my mom kept going on and on about my student and that i was teaching and how the horse could have spooked and hurt my student and what not.

    VERY frustrating.

    I would go with the cops, as they can tell you more of your legal rights. We had to put up "no trespassing on the boarder of out property.

    it sucks winter can't be done soon enough.

    :-)
    Jen
    www.rivendellhorsefarm.com



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar. 23, 2005
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    4,182

    Default



    Note to self: don't move to PA.

    Hunting season IS over here, but even during it I haven't had problems (knock on wood...). I keep right on trail riding, with my blaze orange vest, saddle pad, and polo wraps (and bear bells, though I couldn't find them this year), and the hunters I actually meet are generally polite.

    It does make me nervous, but I'm too stubborn to give up riding for a month and a half!
    Proud member of the EDRF



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar. 7, 2005
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    1,174

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cloudyandcallie View Post
    Best to keep horses in in deer season, post property prolifically, and get a reputation as a person who will protect your property and aninals by any means necessary.
    I have "no trespassing" signs all around my property -- lots of them. One early morning while feeding I saw a hunter passing through my lower pasture (full camo, and bow and arrow). I own a Glock 9mm and know how to use it. He perked right up when he saw me coming -- Glock in hand and screaming at him.

    I look forward to the day I have a reputation as the crazy animal protecting lady.
    If you cannot set a good example, at least serve as a terrible warning....



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb. 27, 2003
    Posts
    3,010

    Default

    I've found the best way to keep out unwanted hunters is to have a few respectful hunters working your property. Hunters get territorial. And they're all armed. If you can find a few hunters who maybe live in a nearby city to hunt on your land and respect your property, that might help. I have a couple who hunt on my farm. This year alone, they've chased off three trespassers. And they know not to shoot the ponies, sheep, or chickens.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct. 18, 2000
    Posts
    22,379

    Default

    You know what's funny is that I foxhunt 3 days a week during the entire deer season and we share the land just fine. Public and private land. I see them because of the blaze orange - they see the huntsman, master and whips because of the scarlet coats. Sometimes we'll stop and talk about what's going on in the woods, if they've seen anything, or some of us gun nuts will ask questions about the firearms they're carrying. One day after fox hunting we hung out with the deer hunters and had hot soup and coffee. They had a little stove set up and everything.

    A fond memory of this season was walking along a dirt road and coming upon a man and his young daughter out hunting. She was smiling and wanted to pet the horses, and of course we obliged.

    I told the father how nice it was to see a girl learning to hunt alongside her Dad, and he beamed and said this was her first time. It's nice to see evidence that ethical hunters are passing on their knowledge to our youth. I admit that sometimes I wonder.

    It's probably just good sense to wear blaze orange during the season, even if you're not hunting.

    If any of y'all want to read up on regs or game laws, usually the game department has free publications available any where a hunting license or ammo is sold. Bag limits will be a separate publication, and then there may be a larger one with all the regs and laws in it. It's free and published every year. That may help answer any questions you might have about a certain practice.

    Driving and flushing of game is usually specifically addressed, as are things like hunting over bait, food plots, legal blinds, use of hounds/dogs, etc. Distance from an occupied dwelling may be found in your state statutes, but you may also want to look at your local ordinances. I know of one county here that regulated a certain type of load. Hunting from the roads/lining the roads, that will most likely also be found in a state statute, but may also be addressed in a game regulation. Shooting across the roadway is bad joo joo no matter what. Game going onto the highway - well - I've read several studies done on several species. That argument is not supported. It's possible for any wild animal to be spooked by anything and run into the road, of course. But hunting also coincides with the rut (deer) and increased foraging activity for mast (bear). Since most collisions occur at night when hunting is not taking place.... well... it's just not supported.

    Anyway - getting involved in your game department may help thwart these idiots. Lord knows lawful hunters are pretty sick of this crap too.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr. 22, 2008
    Posts
    803

    Default

    My family has had good luck by talking to 1 or 2 *trusted* hunters and giving them - and ONLY them - permission to hunt on their land. They tend to get very posessive of "their" territories, and do a good job of chasing off the unsavory hunter types. I don't know if this is an option for you, though, if you don't have any land that can safely be hunted. :-\



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb. 23, 2008
    Posts
    4,266

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cita View Post
    My family has had good luck by talking to 1 or 2 *trusted* hunters and giving them - and ONLY them - permission to hunt on their land. They tend to get very posessive of "their" territories, and do a good job of chasing off the unsavory hunter types. I don't know if this is an option for you, though, if you don't have any land that can safely be hunted. :-\
    Many people I know who have farms do this - it is a super safety feature. A friend with a remote farm has the guy who lives next door hunt and snowmobile on her property. He is out there everyday, and knows if something is not right, and spots the signs if someone has been trespassing.

    One friend of ours who was a city guy bought an old farm in the mountains, and the first year there a guy showed up and said, hey we always could hunt here before, do you mind, and our friend said, sure, whatever. Well, opening day about 60 guys showed up and there were practically fist fights over the best spots. So the next year he picked one guy and banned everyone else!

    We had a very civilized hunting season. We ride on five neighboring farms, and I checked with each of them about hunting, and they all had assigned hunters; all of them asked us to please not ride through the woods during the season, and to tell them right away if we saw anyone besides the assigned people. We stuck to road riding at midday for a while, with blaze vests on. The weather's been crappy anyway, so no huge loss. Tomorrow's the last day of bow season, so we'll be delighted to be back in the fields, weather permitting.

    It's just funny, because every person I ever talk to about hunting (even hunters!) all have no end of stories about all the terrible, drunk, idiot hunters out there! But all the hunters I actually know are very careful and responsible.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan. 12, 2007
    Posts
    4,227

    Default

    I use to fear hunting season because I grew up in the city where no one I knew hunted. Every fall brought new fears of people and guns in my woods and pastures.

    After finding evidence of poaching in my woods my fears increased a million fold. Signs posted did not deter. I contacted local law enforcement and the DNR. After several lengthy discussions with them, Ik realized how difficult it was to "catch some one in the act" to prosecute. I was frustrated and scared! I knew no poacher would care if they shot one of my horses by accident.

    The solution? I allow a few trustworthy local hunters to hunt in my woods. WHY? Because people will not hunt when they know someone is hunting "legally". These guys protect my horses by creating a safe buffer between them and the bad guys! Word gets out and the local guys I have here are all in law enforcement.

    My horses are now safe from morons!



  16. #16

    Default

    I've never had even one problem from hunters even though theres about 6000 acres of state hunting land on 3 sides of us. Theres usually 20 or more deer hunters right around our place and they sit on our fence lines. I have no problem with that its their right to hunt on the state land and on that side of the fence. My horses don't get spooked from gun shots they go about their business grazing and their normal routine.
    Quality doesn\'t cost it pays.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jan. 12, 2007
    Posts
    4,227

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    I wanted to add that domestic animals shot accidentally in hunting season sounds quite horrific - but is really very very rare.

    Also there is CWD in my area. I know that there is no transmittal known to horses - but I do not want to own the first cross over of the disease. So SHOOT THE DEER and protect my horses! The deer are worse than field mice in my area they need to be cleaned out!

    I am very happy - no contented with having hunters here and hunting in general. I never imagined I would be. But it is the proper way of things.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2007
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    10,071

    Default

    Like I said--best hunters-with-permission we've had have been state police guys.

    And where I'm from it's bovine TB and crop damage that's a problem. Our neighbor who cash-farms soy is very supportive of everyone getting and filling their antlerless permit, too. (Does usually have more meat, anyway.)



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Mar. 21, 2006
    Posts
    1,081

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    I only have 20 acres but there are 100's of acres f wooded land on 3 sides of me, i allow my neighbor and his family to coem through my property, they don't even really want to hunt here, just pass through but it helps to have someone walking around in the woods during peak hunting times of the day, I only ask him to not let horses and goats loose and to open my garage door when they're in the woods so I know they're back there
    they're pretty nice people, i doubt they'd shoot any of my animals



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Mar. 1, 2007
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    3,934

    Default

    I have had it with hunters. I am borderline hating them (and I really detest that word, but really..I am getting close!).

    We leased out our beautiful Varian bred arabian mare two years ago to really great people who bred her to a fabulous Varian bred stallion and got a super little black filly that we had just gone out to see a few months ago. Absolutely stunning filly. The whole family was so attached to her, kids, mom ect...she really was their dream come true. She had her front leg blown clean off last month by hunters...can you imagine??

    You know...I try to be open minded but think about it: Hunting is an activity where humans (who are relatively large brained/intelligent) get on really fast, motorized vehicles and use extremely efficient mechanized killing machines to stalk, chase (and often terrorize) and kill/maim something utterly defenceless with a relatively very small brain and relatively slow way of getting around/escaping. Yeah..really something to feel proud of....huge accomplishment there big boy!!.

    I just don't understand the mentality...and I really dislike our species 90 percent of the time....so disapointing.
    www.svhanoverians.com

    "Simple: Breeding,Training, Riding". Wolfram Wittig.



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