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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul. 18, 2007
    Location
    Chesapeake, VA
    Posts
    314

    Default Horse Born with Type I Diabetes

    http://www.cnn.com/video/#/video/us/....diabetes.wtvq

    I can't imagine dealing with that!



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2002
    Location
    West Coast of Michigan
    Posts
    36,312

    Default

    Frankly, I wouldn't deal with it. What a misery for the poor horse. I'd see if a vet school wanted to study the animal.

    I wouldn't let the little monster bite me all the time, either!
    Click here before you buy.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct. 19, 2005
    Posts
    7,320

    Default

    Wow! I wonder if it is fair in the long run to keep him going. Poor guy. Perhaps he'll improve as he matures, if that's even possible.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2001
    Location
    Fort Collins, CO
    Posts
    15,855

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by deltawave View Post
    Frankly, I wouldn't deal with it. What a misery for the poor horse. I'd see if a vet school wanted to study the animal.

    I wouldn't let the little monster bite me all the time, either!
    I agree (on both counts!)

    They have to do an IV stick every four hours to check his levels Poor little pin cushion horse.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar. 12, 2006
    Posts
    1,316

    Default

    That's ridiculous. Just put the little guy down.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    May. 12, 2000
    Location
    NE TN, USA
    Posts
    6,199

    Default

    It sounds like the owner has that option under serious consideration.

    Remember that this is a mass-media network which serves mostly people ignorant of the real world of large animals. They have to downplay what we consider to be obvious.
    “There are two ways to conquer and enslave a nation. One is by the sword. The other is by debt.”
    John Adams



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2002
    Location
    West Coast of Michigan
    Posts
    36,312

    Default

    True enough, Frank. Making drama out of nothing is what the TV news does best.
    Click here before you buy.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar. 14, 2007
    Posts
    276

    Default

    I wonder if this colt's diabetes is attributed to environmental toxins and other factors. I've read that farriers and vets are treating more and more foundered horses, Cushings disease and insulin resistance cases that what they saw twenty years ago.

    It would seem that diabetes would be closely related to the diseases mentioned above. Hopefully there can be some scientific benefits from studying this colt.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2002
    Location
    West Coast of Michigan
    Posts
    36,312

    Default

    Type I diabetes is a whole different animal than type II. Type I is no insulin at all, or not enough, whereas type II is too MUCH insulin and resistant cells that can't make use of it. Toxins are suspect, and so is a viral etiology, in type I. Type II is purely a lifestyle problem, although there is a strong hereditary component in terms of susceptibility, too.
    Click here before you buy.



  10. #10
    rhuger1 Guest

    Default Equine Diabetes

    As the owner of this young foal it was our duty from the day he was born to determine what his medical problems were. In doing so we discovered that he had type 1 diabetes. At that point we could have said ..."Put him down"...but as somone that is in the horse business fulltime my first response was "Why ?"
    My wife and I both wanted answers to this unique case. Our good fortune is that we live in central Ky and our vets happen to be Hygard Equine Medical Center..the largest Vet medical center in the country. In doing routine testing Haygard discoverd this condition...understand that we waited 11 months for this foal....the first foal sired by our 13 time World Champion stallion. As i delved into the world of diabetes I soon discoverd that this is indeed a desease that can be managed. Within two weeks of this case being covered by the media we were getting calls from across the country. The call that started some real discussioin was the one that came from a company called Insulet Corp. Insulet makes a cutting edge insulin pump that can attach to the body and give the patient his or hers...in this case the foals insulin without being invasive. This pump is attached 1 time every 3 days without pain. This pump actually monitors his insulin levels every minute. The fantasic people at Insulet sent a rep from their company to Lexington to meet with us and our vet, Nathan Slovis and in two weeks we will be attaching the pump to "JustIncredible". I might add that Insulet has donated the pump ($800.00) We understand that people might say "Put the little guy down". But what will we have learned from that? This is a desease that more then likly has gone undiagnosed for years...and JustIncredible is the first horse that had owners that saw the need for research and wanted to give this outstanding young foal every chance for success.
    We will keep everyone posted as to his continued care.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun. 9, 2006
    Posts
    587

    Default

    I am amazed at how quick people are to automatically condemn a horse owners decision and how quickly people jump to euthenasia. I hardly think a shot every few hours is considered enough pain to put a horse down, and it sounds like it isn't even like that at all for this horse. Sure it is uncomfortable, but it isn't like the horse is necessarily walking around in severe pain all the time.

    I am a proponent of euthenasia when necessary no doubt about it but just because something is difficult does not mean the horse should die.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    May. 12, 2000
    Location
    NE TN, USA
    Posts
    6,199

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rhuger1 View Post
    ...The call that started some real discussioin was the one that came from a company called Insulet Corp. Insulet makes a cutting edge insulin pump that can attach to the body and give the patient his or hers...in this case the foals insulin without being invasive...
    Is this the device you mention? It appears to be an improvement over the conventional infusion pump. As one who may need such a device in the future, this is of special interest to me. I'm sure there are others on these forums in the same situation.
    “There are two ways to conquer and enslave a nation. One is by the sword. The other is by debt.”
    John Adams



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct. 19, 2005
    Posts
    7,320

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rhuger1 View Post
    As the owner of this young foal it was our duty from the day he was born to determine what his medical problems were. In doing so we discovered that he had type 1 diabetes. At that point we could have said ..."Put him down"...but as somone that is in the horse business fulltime my first response was "Why ?"
    My wife and I both wanted answers to this unique case. Our good fortune is that we live in central Ky and our vets happen to be Hygard Equine Medical Center..the largest Vet medical center in the country. In doing routine testing Haygard discoverd this condition...understand that we waited 11 months for this foal....the first foal sired by our 13 time World Champion stallion. As i delved into the world of diabetes I soon discoverd that this is indeed a desease that can be managed. Within two weeks of this case being covered by the media we were getting calls from across the country. The call that started some real discussioin was the one that came from a company called Insulet Corp. Insulet makes a cutting edge insulin pump that can attach to the body and give the patient his or hers...in this case the foals insulin without being invasive. This pump is attached 1 time every 3 days without pain. This pump actually monitors his insulin levels every minute. The fantasic people at Insulet sent a rep from their company to Lexington to meet with us and our vet, Nathan Slovis and in two weeks we will be attaching the pump to "JustIncredible". I might add that Insulet has donated the pump ($800.00) We understand that people might say "Put the little guy down". But what will we have learned from that? This is a desease that more then likly has gone undiagnosed for years...and JustIncredible is the first horse that had owners that saw the need for research and wanted to give this outstanding young foal every chance for success.
    We will keep everyone posted as to his continued care.
    Many best wishes - I can only imagine how heart breaking this could possibly be not trying to do something about it. I hope that he will be well and has a good and long life!



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec. 12, 2005
    Location
    Myrtle Beach, SC
    Posts
    3,117

    Default

    I hardly understand why we can insist humans go through diabetic treatment and worse and then shirk off as it's inhumane to keep an animal with the same condition alive.... gimme a break. If people are going to argue "a life is a life" then it needs to hold true to this side of the debate as well. It's kinda like a Do Not Resusitate order is not a Do Not Treat order.


    to the foal's humans... good on you for taking the time to have more research done.
    If i'm posting on Coth, it's either raining so I can't ride or it's night time and I can't sleep.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2002
    Location
    West Coast of Michigan
    Posts
    36,312

    Default

    It's not so much the skin tests and the insulin injections that are painful, it's the risk of seizures (which the foal has reportedly had) and the awful consequences of low sugar that would scare me the most. That is a very significant worry, and a source of potential misery for the animal.

    I didn't get the sense that anyone was "jumping" to euthanize, nor criticizing the owners for not doing so. In my personal situation with my personal views, I would choose to euthanize the animal, but would offer the animal to a vet school for research first. That's not to say that these owners are "wrong" for not doing so. It is simply a matter of opinion.
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