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  1. #1
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    Default Parelli Farrier..."Healthy Stride"....Pics added

    http://healthy-stride.net/difference.html

    Has anyone ever heard of this "method" or this farrier?

    Edited to Add:

    It have been brought to my intention that some people who read this post as it as originally stated came to the conclusion that the barn where the Parelli endorsed Natural Stride Farrier was working in this area is a "Parelli barn." I wish to clarify that the barn is a Parelli-friendly barn and it is not required to practice Parelli methods to board there.
    Last edited by Daydream Believer; Jan. 1, 2009 at 09:32 PM.



  2. #2
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    Oct. 19, 2005
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    Healthy Stride shoes or trims according to the entire equine body instead of just the hoof. Our goal is to achieve perfect posture and symmetry (Zero Balance™), allowing the horse to move freely and soundly.
    This is a potential warning flag to me because you cannot achieve perfect posture through trimming, only through correct training which in turn will have a positive affect on hoof wear anf form! The trimming should assist this process, but cannot create it. I still believe that the hoof capsule primarily needs to be balanced according to internal hoof structures - period!



  3. #3
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    Apr. 22, 2006
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    Default

    Oh my freaking word! They're going to take over the world.



  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by BornToRide View Post
    The trimming should assist this process, but cannot create it. I still believe that the hoof capsule primarily needs to be balanced according to internal hoof structures - period!
    Agreed...In my experience and training, the hoof structure and what it takes to create the correct movement dynamics working within the diameters of the hoof's structure will determine how I trim/balance the hoof. 99% of the time, doing so, helps horses with poor posture and bad movement. Unlike some people, I would never make a correction so quickly as to harm/hurt/draw blood to achieve that goal.
    Last edited by Daydream Believer; Dec. 31, 2008 at 02:09 PM.



  5. #5
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    Yes, one can definitely screw up the posture by leaving heels and toes too long for example, but the shoulder differences shown on the website are primarily related to side dominance and not how the horse is trimmed. The dominant shoulder generally shows more muscle developemt for obvious reasons - it is simply used more

    Most body deviations suggested on the evaluation form are usually created by musculo-skeletal imbalances that may or may not be exacerbated by hoof form!



  6. #6
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    May. 16, 2007
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    Default

    It is a slick professional looking website but this just sounds snake-oily to me. What if the horse needs a chiropractic adjustment to level out its back end ? Instead they go with the trimmer who "levels out" the backend thru trimming. It sounds to me like this could set off a chain of events that would be really complicated to diagnose and fix.



  7. #7
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    Jan. 16, 2002
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    West Coast of Michigan
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    Default

    Is anyone surprised? Next it will be a line of feeds, mark my words.
    Click here before you buy.



  8. #8
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    Feb. 28, 2001
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    Default

    You really do NOT want to get me started on this.

    I have no first hand experience but I have heard about his 'theory' and seen the less than stellar results on his work on the Parelli horses.


    He shims part of a foot, one foot, some feet, whatever to 'balance the body.' He is one of those that lifts one foot to compensate for a too short leg.

    It just so happens that MANY horses have too short legs these days

    A few weeks back I saw a horse that was shod using this method and he was just lame. Crippled looking-poor owner was clueless.

    I get the Savvy Club DVDs and now spend too hours STARING at the sad feet on the Parelli horses..you just don't want to know.

    For the record, to my knowledge he is simply endorsed by Parelli's since that is who they currently use-but I am pretty sure he 'stands on his own'



  9. #9
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    He shims part of a foot, one foot, some feet, whatever to 'balance the body.' He is one of those that lifts one foot to compensate for a too short leg.
    Just as I feared would happen. The shorter leg comes from being pulled up at the shoulder. Wedges won't cure/fix this, only bodywork and exercises that will help balance the body out......BIG SIGH



  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by BornToRide View Post
    Just as I feared would happen. The shorter leg comes from being pulled up at the shoulder. Wedges won't cure/fix this, only bodywork and exercises that will help balance the body out......BIG SIGH
    I know.

    (well it could also be saddle fit or rider balance that creates issues-BUT the shims are just NOT the answer!!!)



  11. #11
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    Default

    Yep



  12. #12
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    Feb. 18, 2006
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    east central Illinois and working north to the 'burbs
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    What a crock. PT Barnum would be proud!

    They are advocating/performing no differently than any well trained and qualified farrier(I can't speak for those of the BUA persuasion because, well, because I'm a farrier. )

    From a customer standpoint, filling out a form is good PR.

    Every horse, new client or old client, that walks up onto my mats gets a full look-over and if the owner or his/her agent is present, they are questioned about anything I find out of the ordinary. If not present, then it gets noted on their bill.

    I suppose that if you are "Parelli inclined", then having a farrier who has been blessed by Parelli would give you lots of warm fuzzies and strokes and lift a great burden from your mind because you'd know your horse was in good hoof care hands. Or not.

    Fortunately for me, my clients/customers are, generally speaking, not so easily duped.



  13. #13
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    Rick, if you have never seen the results of the shimming solution, you would just be

    Honestly-talk about making a horse SO body sore you want to cry.

    This could actually be another example of how to unify good farriers and BUA.



  14. #14
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    Dec. 9, 2005
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    North East, MD
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    I have no idea whether he's better at his job than anybody else. BUT, a number of the trimming protocols out there do tend to ignore the rest of the horse (especially the legs) and go for a "perfect hoof". If this guy hadn't attached the Parrelli name to his ideas would you like it better?

    Yes, a good trimmer/farrier takes the entire horse into account. This guy has a slick way of selling it.

    Personally, I'd be curious to watch him work and see what I think of his results. I'll bring my own beverage, though.



  15. #15
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    It has NOTHING to do with the Parelli endorsement as far as I am concerned-I have seen one horse in person and several on DVDs that are the result of this concept.

    Really--just run run run Forrest run.



  16. #16
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    Dec. 9, 2005
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    LMH, have any pictures? I'm familiar with Esco Buff's ideas about limb length disparity leading to club feet in the front. He watched the horse move down the aisle from many viewing points, including above to try to pinpoint what was wrong in the horse's body. The horse kind of snaked along in that nothing was straight.

    He then wedged the hind feet (determined the problem originated in the hindquarts) to change his posture. Only then did he shoe the fronts. I was unable to stay for that part so I don't know whether either front foot was wedged. The owner was supposed to have chiropractic work done ASAP and massage, and over time, the need for wedges would go away and the foot would stop trying to compensate for a problem in the shoulder--that is, it would stop being a club foot.

    The owner wasn't able to follow the protocol and the local farrier thought it was a crock, so I couldn't say whether it would have worked. Bummer.

    Is this what you are talking about?



  17. #17
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    The healthy-stride guy does shimming? Somehow, I missed that on his web site.



  18. #18
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    Rick, a well trained "BUA" does the same thing. We take into account the whole horse, their posture, how they move, diet, saddle fit, etc....
    Last edited by Daydream Believer; Jan. 1, 2009 at 07:02 PM.



  19. #19
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    Default

    So when do we see Parelli Vets?
    You jump in the saddle,
    Hold onto the bridle!
    Jump in the line!
    ...Belefonte



  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by matryoshka View Post
    The healthy-stride guy does shimming? Somehow, I missed that on his web site.
    Yes he does shimming-he will shim say, the lateral side of the Right rear...or the medial side of the right front-or the entire foot...all depending on where the body is not balanced.

    It sounds good on paper but if you SAW these horses move you would shudder.

    I had photos that someone emailed to me of Remmer (Linda's horse) and I have the (I think) September and October Savvy club DVDs where you can REALLY see the impact on the movement.

    I did not save the photos of Remmer.

    If you do a search on youtube of the Parelli tour promotions or clips from tour stops from the past year or so you may be able to catch a glimpse of his feet.

    They are so deformed looking (or were-I have not seen anything recent) that it just is jaw dropping.

    A fellow hoof care friend saw him live in August and was in shock at how bad they bad.

    And as I mentioned I saw one horse with half shim on-he was nearly crippled on sand and even worse when his feet hit concrete.

    I honestly could not tell you what it does long term-BUT the problem *I* have is the discomfort during the process-it makes a horse totally body sore and short strided for the 'long term good' when it can be addressed without doing it.

    The problem as BTR mentions-and I really agree (with the additions I noted)-is the body balance is not fixed through the body!

    It is NO different in my eyes than removing the bars to decontract a hoof. Wrong solution for the issue.

    I actually have an article on my website that I wrote for The Horses Hoof that talks about hoof imbalances as a reflection of body imbalances-granted it focuses on bare hooves but the concepts should NOT be news to anyone with horses-bare or shod.

    This is not barefoot biased...I am really certain any of our well respected and vocal farriers on this forum would agree with what I concluded from what I saw.

    Someone may want to run a search on horseshoes-I can bet you it has been discussed over there.



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