The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 37
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct. 12, 2008
    Posts
    22

    Smile Coggins ?

    I'm from england and have no idea what coggins stands for. Could somebody explain . thank you



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct. 11, 2000
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    3,278

    Default

    A coggins test is a test for Equine Infectious Anemia. It is done annually and required by most barns and show venues, etc before an outside horse is allowed on the property as the disease is highly contagious.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar. 23, 2005
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    4,182

    Default

    "Coggins" is the colloquial name for the test for Equine Infectious Anemia. Horses in the US are required to have a recent (usually within either 6 months or a year) negative test in order to go to shows, cross state lines, be sold, and, in many states, even just be transported off the property where they live.

    A positive result means a choice between euthanasia and lifelong quarantine away from other equines. Barns with a positive result are quarantined for some time (the time depends on the state) and not released until every remaining equite tests negative.

    EIA is bloodborne (transmitted most often by biting flies or contaminated needles) and used to be very prevalent in the US. It is still endemic in some areas (mostly southern climates). Most carriers are inapparent and never show symptoms of the disease. The risk of transmission is actually quite small, but it does happen, and there is no vaccine or cure - hence the emphasis on testing.

    Because the incubation period can be up to 3 months, though, even annual testing doesn't catch every case before the horse has a chance to infect others. Testing has, however, dramatically reduced the incidence of the disease.
    Proud member of the EDRF



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar. 26, 2005
    Location
    Back to Normal.. or as close as I'll ever get
    Posts
    10,422

    Default

    Coggins is a blood test for Equine Infectious Anemia

    http://ezinearticles.com/?What-Is-th...est?&id=509657

    If you plan on showing your horse or even going to a clinic away from the place you board (or your own farm) you will be asked to provide proof of a negative result for a Coggins test taken within the last year. Some places require an updated Coggins every six months.
    *friend of bar.ka*RIP all my lovely boys, gone too soon:
    Steppin' Out 1988-2004
    Hey Vern! 1982-2009, Cash's Bay Threat 1994-2009
    Sam(Jaybee Altair) 1994-2015



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2007
    Location
    too far south
    Posts
    510

    Default

    Concerning buying and selling......I have always thought the coggins was the responsibility of the seller. Lately I have seen in some ads, the person (seller) stating that it is the responsibility of the buyer. Is there a law somewhere that clarifies who is responsible?



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar. 26, 2005
    Location
    Back to Normal.. or as close as I'll ever get
    Posts
    10,422

    Default

    12hooves:
    I don't know the legal aspect, but if I were buying I'd be willing to shell out for a Coggins before sealing the deal if there was not a current negative one available. As I recall it's around $40.
    Since owner's information goes on the form the vet fills out I imagine that info would be the seller's?
    *friend of bar.ka*RIP all my lovely boys, gone too soon:
    Steppin' Out 1988-2004
    Hey Vern! 1982-2009, Cash's Bay Threat 1994-2009
    Sam(Jaybee Altair) 1994-2015



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar. 23, 2005
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    4,182

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 12hooves View Post
    Concerning buying and selling......I have always thought the coggins was the responsibility of the seller. Lately I have seen in some ads, the person (seller) stating that it is the responsibility of the buyer. Is there a law somewhere that clarifies who is responsible?
    It depends on your state. Some states don't even require testing for sale. In those that do, you'd have to just look at the statutes to see. A good overview is here. It's several years old, but it will give you a statute number to start with if you are researching.

    However, as a buyer, I always have my own Coggins drawn even if the seller has one. They're cheap, and way too easy to falsify.
    Proud member of the EDRF



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug. 26, 2001
    Location
    Oxford PA
    Posts
    10,337

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ponyjumper4 View Post
    . . . . as the disease is highly contagious.
    I don't think EIA is regarded as highly contagious. There have been cases of horses living on the same farm with an EIA infected horse for years, with the non-infected horse never becoming infected.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov. 29, 2005
    Posts
    2,625

    Default

    Coggins testing is not require in-state for California. You *can* transport to Nevada or Arizona without getting a coggins but technically you are required when crossing out of state.

    I've yet to find any legal authority (police/ boarder) caring to see a coggins test. Only once in AZ was I asked to show coggins and that was when moving out here.

    There is obviously controversy with the testing.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar. 9, 2006
    Location
    Lucama, NC
    Posts
    5,868

    Default

    FYI, the name "Coggins" comes from Dr. Coggins who developed the test that is how the name came about



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar. 9, 2006
    Location
    Lucama, NC
    Posts
    5,868

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 12hooves View Post
    Concerning buying and selling......I have always thought the coggins was the responsibility of the seller. Lately I have seen in some ads, the person (seller) stating that it is the responsibility of the buyer. Is there a law somewhere that clarifies who is responsible?
    In the state of NC it is the SELLER's responsiblilty to provide a negative Coggins within one year. If a buyer wants a more recent one, I would expect the buyer to pay for it. I suspect this is a state by state requirement.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar. 9, 2006
    Location
    Lucama, NC
    Posts
    5,868

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SuperSTB View Post
    Coggins testing is not require in-state for California. You *can* transport to Nevada or Arizona without getting a coggins but technically you are required when crossing out of state.

    I've yet to find any legal authority (police/ boarder) caring to see a coggins test. Only once in AZ was I asked to show coggins and that was when moving out here.

    There is obviously controversy with the testing.

    You'd better not go in or out of Florida then!!! You will DEFINITELY have to stop at the Ag station and show proof of negative coggins as well as a health certificate within 30 days to go in or out of Florida!!



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug. 6, 2003
    Location
    Lapeer, MI, USA
    Posts
    4,075

    Default

    Each state has its own laws regarding when a horse requires one. Some states require 2 per year.

    In Michigan, they have a "13 month" year. This allows people to test in December to show in early January. A horse tested in December has VERY little chance of contracting EIA before Jan. So, testing a horse in December of one year, carries through the following calendar year - hence 13 months.

    As a buyer - if the last coggins test was done during the winter and it hasn't warmed up enough for biting flies which carry EIA, then I'm satisfied with that one. If the last coggins was drawn and there has been warm weather since - then I insist on a new Coggins test. I am also willing to have it done as a buyer because THEN the paperwork (Federal Government standardized) is in MY name - not the last owner's name.

    My purchase agreements ALWAYS include a right of full refund in the event the horse tests positive.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2007
    Location
    too far south
    Posts
    510

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kementari View Post
    It depends on your state. Some states don't even require testing for sale. In those that do, you'd have to just look at the statutes to see. A good overview is here. It's several years old, but it will give you a statute number to start with if you are researching.

    However, as a buyer, I always have my own Coggins drawn even if the seller has one. They're cheap, and way too easy to falsify.
    Thanks for the info. For Florida it is the seller's responsibility as I thought. That's a good idea to get a new coggins, as a buyer, though. Since even if it is the true coggins, It only means the horse was negative on the day they drew the blood, right?



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2007
    Location
    too far south
    Posts
    510

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by shawneeAcres View Post
    You'd better not go in or out of Florida then!!! You will DEFINITELY have to stop at the Ag station and show proof of negative coggins as well as a health certificate within 30 days to go in or out of Florida!!
    You got that right! Better stop even if your trailer is empty.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2008
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    2,529

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 12hooves View Post
    Thanks for the info. For Florida it is the seller's responsibility as I thought. That's a good idea to get a new coggins, as a buyer, though. Since even if it is the true coggins, It only means the horse was negative on the day they drew the blood, right?

    That's correct, and one of the weak links in the process. Theoretically a horse could get a Coggin's test drawn one day and the next become infected, and be exposed to other horses for a year without anyone knowing. As a precaution (I live in Florida, and actually had a positive horse years ago who had to be destroyed) I always insist on a new coggins at sale time. Other than that, though, I try not to worry about it, as it's not as common as it was back in the 70's and early 80's thanks to the testing program.

    In Florida, you have to show your coggins at show grounds in order to gain entrance, and some barns require a fresh test before admitting you for stabling (most just require you to be current, though). And yes, the Florida Dept. of Agriculture is rabid, and not only about coggins. It's because we're a border state at high risk for infections and invasive species, so they're extra careful and receive extra funding for enforcement.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Nov. 29, 2005
    Posts
    2,625

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by shawneeAcres View Post
    You'd better not go in or out of Florida then!!! You will DEFINITELY have to stop at the Ag station and show proof of negative coggins as well as a health certificate within 30 days to go in or out of Florida!!
    Yes- Florida is really on top of livestock and argiculture transportation. Arizona usually is too. Southern Cali *in-state* is not when it comes to horses.

    I pull 15 day health cert on my horses going out of state- coggins is typically turned around in 7-10 days so it's easy to swing by the vet and pick up a cert rather quickly. But I am certainly not the norm around here (So Cal).

    In New England- Coggins was drawn yearly but the only time I ever had to show results was at shows and a few hunter paces. What always got me was at Equine Affaire though- I would bring in state horses- but health certs and coggins were not a requirement according to state law. Go figure! Only horses travel from out of state had to bring such documentation. I always had it regardless but still at least a health cert should be asked!



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Oct. 11, 2000
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    3,278

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Evalee Hunter View Post
    I don't think EIA is regarded as highly contagious. There have been cases of horses living on the same farm with an EIA infected horse for years, with the non-infected horse never becoming infected.
    I consider anything that can be spread by fly bites highly contagious. If it wasn't, then what would be the need of having proof of a negative test result?



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Mar. 23, 2005
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    4,182

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ponyjumper4 View Post
    I consider anything that can be spread by fly bites highly contagious. If it wasn't, then what would be the need of having proof of a negative test result?
    The way a disease is spread and how contagious it is are two completely different issues.

    A horse showing clinical symptoms of EIA is very contagious. An inapparent carrier, though - and most positive tests are horses who are inapparent carriers - is not very contagious at all. It's estimated that the chance of a fly biting an inapparent carrier and then transmitting the disease to another horse is 1 in 6 million.

    Additionally, the virus cannot live long or continue to replicate once it is outside of the horse, so even a horse at its most contagious is only likely to infect horses that are quite close by.

    The reason for the testing requirements is because there is no cure and no vaccine. The disease used to be very prevalent in the US - and quite deadly. Testing is the reason that so many of us don't know all the facts about EIA through personal experience.
    Proud member of the EDRF



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jun. 27, 2002
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    5,257

    Default

    In TN, any horse that leaves the farm is required to be accompanied by an original yellow negative coggins drawn within 12 months. For sale, horses are required to have a coggins within 6 months.

    I don't cross state lines without a coggins AND current health papers.



Similar Threads

  1. How long to get a coggins?
    By Honu in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: Feb. 13, 2011, 09:05 PM
  2. Shipping and Coggins
    By Iride in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: Jan. 5, 2011, 10:34 PM
  3. Outdated Coggins ????
    By Bank of Dad in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 55
    Last Post: Oct. 10, 2010, 06:43 PM
  4. Coggins question
    By gettingbettereveryday in forum Off Course
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: Jul. 27, 2010, 02:52 PM
  5. Incomplete Coggins?
    By CapitolDesign in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: Mar. 7, 2010, 01:38 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •