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  1. #1
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    Default Spinoff: Feeding Beet Pulp at Boarding Barns

    Hey ya'll...

    The end of grazing has come. Ponies are now in gravel paddocks- and not so happy about it. LOL.

    I am trying to figure out the best way to get extra forage product to my ponies in the absence of grazing. I'm thinking about adding beet pulp to their diet in the am/pm, and moving some of their hay to a 3rd meal during the day.

    My boarding barn is awesome, in that they are super flexible, and low-key. A couple boarders and i are willing to split duties to get this 3rd meal to the horses as the BO does work during the day. BO is more than happy to let us do this.

    My main question is beet pulp management at boarding barns. Does your boarding barn do the soaking without issue? Or did you have to devise some sort of system to make it easier on everyone?

    I'm thinking about just paying for extra hay as that is the easiest thing to do- but its also more expensive, and our hay is pretty darn rich- it'd be another $90/month. So before I concede to that, I'm wondering if there is something I can set up to make feeding beet pulp a breeze?

    All the beet pulp i've ever fed, even if molasses free, is still incredibly dirty and needs to be rinsed before my horses even touch it. So it won't be as simple as soaking in a bucket and feeding.

    So, for those of you who board and feed beet pulp, how do you manage this?



  2. #2
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    Default

    The barns I've boarded at that feed beet pulp have never charged for the service -- They tend to soak it overnight in the winter, but only about 15 minutes on a hot day -- Some barns try to avoid feeding it in the summer --
    "I never mind if an adult uses safety stirrups." GM



  3. #3
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    Default

    If adequate hay is being given (at least 1.5% of body weight, preferably 2), you don't need to worry about additional forage. You mentioned extra hay, but do you know how much they're getting now?

    That said, bp is nice for additional calories There are other, lower-maintenance calories though, if that becomes an issue. Alfalfa pellets is one.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  4. #4
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    Default

    Thanks!

    Yes, i do know how much they are getting, a little less than 20 lbs per day, plus 4 lbs alfalfa pellets. So the combination of that is very close to 2% of body weight, but they could probably get a little more forage. they are all in excellent weight, and I want to keep them that way. I am paying more $ to get them extra hay to reach the ~20 lb mark, already.

    It isn't so much that they need more- i just want to spread it out during the day more so they don't go 8 hours without eating for physical and mental health reasons. So i was thinking of adding beet pulp to an am or pm meal, and moving some hay to the 3rd meal in the afternoon.

    Or just ferget it all and just buy some more hay for each of them.



  5. #5
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    Nov. 1, 2005
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    Default

    IME beet pulp at boarding barns is not usually successful, unless one person does the feeding and they are the meticulous type. As noted, the soaking time varies depending on temperatures. Since it can ferment if left too long, the soaking bucket gets gross unless it is rinsed out after every feeding. If a horse does not clean it up you have to rinse the feed tub.

    I feed beet pulp in my home barn and am a fan for adding calories but when I had a horse at a boarding barn that needed the bp I usually just brought a soaked bucket out with me and fed it after I rode.
    I love cooking with wine. Sometimes I even put it in the food.



  6. #6
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    Jul. 15, 2005
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    I personally think beep is a PITA and would always look for an alternative for my own horses. I'll deal with it for a boarder, but I hate dealing with that stuff.
    www.hogbackhillfarm.com



  7. #7
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    Nov. 26, 2003
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    I can't stand beet pulp. At this point in my equine life, I refuse to feed it and if I had s someone ask about boarding that wanted to feed it I would tell them this wasn't the place for them.
    That said, at one point I did feed it. This works well and is also a good way to take it to shows and stuff.
    Get the 3 gallon size Ziploc freezer bags. Put your beet pulp in it, fill up with water. Zip it shut. Let it soak however long it needs to, then flatten the bags and freeze them.
    Your BO or whomever is feeding can pull one out or you can leave them out for them to feed and they don't have to worry about soaking it, it getting rancid, or whatever.
    An added plus is when frozen they will store flat.
    "Perhaps the final test of anybody's love of dogs is their willingness to permit them to make a camping ground of the bed" -Henry T. Merwin



  8. #8

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    I don't mind it at all. When feeding it at our 30 horse boarding barn, we mixed up about 6-10 quarts of dry, left it overnight to soak and each horse got a specified amount of the soaked pulp. Some days you had a little more than you needed but it isn't expensive so we just trashed it. No biggie.

    At my smaller barn now, each horse has their own bucket of feed with a name cover. Specified amount of dry pulp is added to bucket and covered with water, then at feeding, grain and supplements are added, mixed and fed. All buckets are then rinsed and prepped for next feeding.
    "are you yawning? You don't ride well enough to yawn...I can yawn, because I ride better than you, Meredith Michael Beerbaum can yawn, you, not so much..." George Morris in Camden, SC



  9. #9
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    do those who feed it dont have to worry about rinsing the soaked beet pulp? why are my horses so picky?



  10. #10
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    You can rinse it if you want before you freeze the bags, fill the bags, drain the water, fill again, freeze.
    I have just found that in FL beet pulp tends to get rancid when you leave it out to soak, and it's a pain. So I don't feed it. But when I did, the ziploc bag thing worked well.
    You take the pm one out in the am to thaw, and the am one out in the pm and so on.
    And like I said, it's great to take on overnighters.
    "Perhaps the final test of anybody's love of dogs is their willingness to permit them to make a camping ground of the bed" -Henry T. Merwin



  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by myhorsefaith View Post
    do those who feed it dont have to worry about rinsing the soaked beet pulp? why are my horses so picky?
    I have never rinsed it. What are you having to rinse off?

    I use pellets with no molasses. I soak it at about a 2:1 ratio of water to pellets. If I over estimated the water and it is too soupy I pour some off while holding the rest back with my hand and it is just dark coloured beet pulp "juice".
    I love cooking with wine. Sometimes I even put it in the food.



  12. #12
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    i use non-mollassed pellets as well. but the water is usually dirty looking, with a bunch of particles in it- its gritty- like sand or dirt.(i thought it might be mollasses, so i tried it, LOL)

    ...and once rinsed to pretty much clear, the horses will gobble it up, if i don't rinse the soaked beet pulp, then they don't want it.

    I have access to Standlee beet pulp that i have not tried yet, so maybe theirs is cleaner.



  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by myhorsefaith View Post
    i use non-mollassed pellets as well. but the water is usually dirty looking, with a bunch of particles in it- its gritty- like sand or dirt.(i thought it might be mollasses, so i tried it, LOL)

    ...and once rinsed to pretty much clear, the horses will gobble it up, if i don't rinse the soaked beet pulp, then they don't want it.

    I have access to Standlee beet pulp that i have not tried yet, so maybe theirs is cleaner.
    Interesting, I have never found there to be gritty stuff in it. Maybe different companies produce different quality? I always thought it was a standard thing.
    I love cooking with wine. Sometimes I even put it in the food.



  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by myhorsefaith View Post
    Thanks!

    Yes, i do know how much they are getting, a little less than 20 lbs per day, plus 4 lbs alfalfa pellets. So the combination of that is very close to 2% of body weight, but they could probably get a little more forage. they are all in excellent weight, and I want to keep them that way. I am paying more $ to get them extra hay to reach the ~20 lb mark, already.

    It isn't so much that they need more- i just want to spread it out during the day more so they don't go 8 hours without eating for physical and mental health reasons. So i was thinking of adding beet pulp to an am or pm meal, and moving some hay to the 3rd meal in the afternoon.

    Or just ferget it all and just buy some more hay for each of them.
    I left you a suggestion on the "Off Course" forum.



  15. #15
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jaegermonster View Post
    This works well and is also a good way to take it to shows and stuff.
    Get the 3 gallon size Ziploc freezer bags. Put your beet pulp in it, fill up with water. Zip it shut. Let it soak however long it needs to, then flatten the bags and freeze them.
    Your BO or whomever is feeding can pull one out or you can leave them out for them to feed and they don't have to worry about soaking it, it getting rancid, or whatever.
    An added plus is when frozen they will store flat.
    OMG what a brilliant idea. Thanks. I never thought of that!



  16. #16
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    Hey thanks- I read it.

    For me to buy hay on my own or buy my barn's hay is the same. It works out to be $30/month for an extra flake. My BO will sell the extra hay at cost. Hay is very expensive here. $17 or higher for 70-80 lb bale, not including tax or delivery charges. So its a pretty nice deal with little hassle.

    But I hear ya, it'd almost be easier to just buy extra hay for them than worry myself and others about the beet pulp thing. I'd hate to be the "annoying" boarder.

    plus the horses might like it more. I guess if they get pudgy i could always cut down the alfalfa pellets to a pound or 2.



  17. #17
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    I am really surprised that your horses distinguish between rinsed and not rinsed beet pulp. Did you really do a fair comparison -- it wasn't the difference between two brands, or some left out that might have gotten a bit fermented?

    I know you're in the same area as I am (Seattle Eastside) so I imagine you have the same selection of beet pulp I do: all pelleted (have never seen shreds) and none with molasses. When I make it up for our crew, I fill a bucket half full with the pellets, then fill it to just under the top with water. The water does get discolored and has bits of fiber stuff floating in it, but I always figured it was just beet pulp debris flaking off. I have never rinsed, and the horses gobble it up.

    In a boarding situation, I think I'd make it at home, if you (and your friend) are going to be making trips out to the barn to feed it. You could keep it out on a porch or in the garage -- come home from barn, put the next meal on to soak. In our climate it doesn't freeze outside except very very rarely, and in the winter with temps in the 40s it can go 48-72 hours without getting even a hint of rancidness. (As an aside, boy is it a pain to try to feed in the summer -- it can "go bad" between breakfast and dinner...)

    I like it, can you tell? It is the backbone of our feeding plan, even for easy keepers. Grain meal = beet pulp, alfalfa pellets, flax, vit/min supplement.
    Arrange whatever pieces come your way. - Virginia Woolf

    Did you know that if you say the word "GULLIBLE" really softly, it sounds like "ORANGES"?



  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jaegermonster View Post
    Get the 3 gallon size Ziploc freezer bags. Put your beet pulp in it, fill up with water. Zip it shut. Let it soak however long it needs to, then flatten the bags and freeze them.
    Your BO or whomever is feeding can pull one out or you can leave them out for them to feed and they don't have to worry about soaking it, it getting rancid, or whatever.
    An added plus is when frozen they will store flat.
    Oh bless you! This may have solved the summer feeding dilemma!

    I have an EPSM mare that needs her oil-laden meal year-round, and it is absorbed best in soaked beet pulp.
    Arrange whatever pieces come your way. - Virginia Woolf

    Did you know that if you say the word "GULLIBLE" really softly, it sounds like "ORANGES"?



  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoZ View Post
    I am really surprised that your horses distinguish between rinsed and not rinsed beet pulp. Did you really do a fair comparison -- it wasn't the difference between two brands, or some left out that might have gotten a bit fermented?

    I know you're in the same area as I am (Seattle Eastside) so I imagine you have the same selection of beet pulp I do: all pelleted (have never seen shreds) and none with molasses. When I make it up for our crew, I fill a bucket half full with the pellets, then fill it to just under the top with water. The water does get discolored and has bits of fiber stuff floating in it, but I always figured it was just beet pulp debris flaking off. I have never rinsed, and the horses gobble it up.

    In a boarding situation, I think I'd make it at home, if you (and your friend) are going to be making trips out to the barn to feed it. You could keep it out on a porch or in the garage -- come home from barn, put the next meal on to soak. In our climate it doesn't freeze outside except very very rarely, and in the winter with temps in the 40s it can go 48-72 hours without getting even a hint of rancidness. (As an aside, boy is it a pain to try to feed in the summer -- it can "go bad" between breakfast and dinner...)

    I like it, can you tell? It is the backbone of our feeding plan, even for easy keepers. Grain meal = beet pulp, alfalfa pellets, flax, vit/min supplement.
    LOL yes my horses are annoying! I've purchased from reber and the grange. I think it is the Grainlands's Select bag...the brown bag with the farm icon/stamp on the front..I forget the name.

    I can count on 1 finger the # of bags I've gotten that didn't require me rinsing the stuff. I stopped buying it because it was a pain- i'd soak some at home, rinse it, and bring it when I go to the barn. But that is not a viable solution for 7 days a week.

    I'm going to experiment with standlee from Dels. if it is well recieved then i'll ask my BO if they mind soaking/feeding for AM.



  20. #20
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    Buy the shredded version.

    Soaks up in less than 15 minutes, less gritty, a little more expensive.



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