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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug. 2, 2004
    Location
    Whidbey Is, Wash.
    Posts
    9,807

    Default Cribbing: really that bad??

    I was always one of those people who said I'd never own a cribber, that there are enough good horses out there to not get a cribber, etc etc...and I went and tried a horse, liked him, and he's a cribber.

    Pass him by, or not? He has a couple of other issues in addition to the cribbing, but he's sane and willing and they aren't bad issues. He's managed with a collar, but if it's off he goes right to it.
    COTH's official mini-donk enabler

    "I am all for reaching out, but in some situations it needs to be done with a rolled up news paper." Alagirl



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug. 1, 2008
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    67

    Default

    I have a cribber. I went looking for a horse with no vices with straight movement. I came home with a cribber that slightly wings. I did not know he was a cribber until I brought him hime and put him in a stall. He is not controlled completely by a collar. He looks to the fences around the arena when riding to crib, and cribs on the crossties even with his collar on.
    He is one of the quietest horses I have known. I wouldn't trade him for anything. I would look at a cribber again.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2000
    Location
    El Paso, TX
    Posts
    12,829

    Default

    I'm not bothered by it. Jet is stalled next to one. She cribs on everything. She's never had a colic, is an easy keeper, and no other horses have picked it up from her.
    If you like the horse, buy it. And when you get it, try a course of Gastroguard, free choice hay, and as much turnout as possible. Many times horses do it due to stress, ulcers or boredom.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2007
    Location
    Pen Argyl PA
    Posts
    3,875

    Default

    I Also said i'd never own a cribber. But I bought this one. He's perfect for me. BUT he cribs. SO i electrify the top of the fences with my solar charger. I board, so i asked in advance and it was ok. I also feed him at ground level in a rubber feed tub and lower the water bucket just a little. There are things you can do to prevent it, but my guy would even crib between the stall bars. So i got some 1/2 mesh screen, and stapled it up. Most Stables have allowed me to do such things, b/c i ask and i offer to pay for supplies. ( and install myself). Good Luck. My guy cribs due to boredom, and he's very intelligent. So if he's worked a lot, he cribs less. Of course right now, there is no way for him to crib.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep. 15, 2008
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    1,470

    Default

    I have a cribber but other issues come with that, like ulcers and colic, which has been a frequent problem. I don't think I will look at cribbers again. This one has cost a lot of money and headaches so far.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul. 23, 2003
    Location
    itty bitty town, GA
    Posts
    3,003

    Default

    I have four cribbers in my barn right now - one wears a collar, the other three are minimal and only do it here and there. They are all great horses and the cribbing is really not a big deal. I can only think of one time in my 40+ years of being in horses where cribbing was a problem and that was with a gelding who would pull the top board off of our wood fences in his cribbing efforts. I finally started turning him out in a collar and the problem was solved. I would never hesitate to buy a cribber if I liked the horse in all other aspects.
    Susan N.

    Don't get confused between my personality & my attitude. My personality is who I am, my attitude depends on who you are.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug. 22, 2002
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    1,712

    Default

    Didn't go looking for one, but have one. I could care less. Don't make him wear a collar. Had ulcers problems last year related to meds and illness, but once resolved he is on the same maintenance as the rest of the non-cribbers. No one "catches" it and he is happy to do his job.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun. 30, 2005
    Posts
    2,185

    Default

    I bought a horse last year who was not a cribber but then sent him out for a 90-day tune up and he came back a cribber. He was in a stall 22 hours a day and was next to a cribber. Ironically he didn't start cribbing until he was 16 years old. I don't put a collar on him and so far (knock on wood) he hasn't had any cribbing related issues.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov. 5, 2002
    Location
    way out west
    Posts
    3,170

    Default

    I have a cribber and it's not a big deal. Of course, he's not one of those cribbers who become oblivious to anything else in the world and are completely obnoxious about it. I kept a collar on him for years, but took it off when I retired him, and he only cribs when he gets his senior feed, once a day.

    Never had colic or ulcer issues. He's the most talented horse I've ever owned, and I can trust him with any level of rider.

    Plus, he's got a heart of gold and is the horse my little grandson will ride when he's old enough. I've seen him pack little ones around, and he acts like he's walking on eggshells and is amazingly careful with them.

    Worth his weight in gold. I wouldn't hesitate to buy another cribber if he's the right horse in other ways. His best friend, my 18 year old gelding, has lived with him for 14 years and has never picked it up, either.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul. 23, 2003
    Location
    itty bitty town, GA
    Posts
    3,003

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Diamondindykin View Post
    I bought a horse last year who was not a cribber but then sent him out for a 90-day tune up and he came back a cribber. He was in a stall 22 hours a day and was next to a cribber. Ironically he didn't start cribbing until he was 16 years old. I don't put a collar on him and so far (knock on wood) he hasn't had any cribbing related issues.

    It doubt if your horse truly learned it from the cribber next to him. Certain horses will not crib except under certain conditions and it might be that he was just uncomfortable enough where you sent him, or where he was stalled, to bring out the habit. I bought a 10 year old gelding at a sale about five years ago who has become a family horse because of his terrific personality. He never cribbed at home and I was quite astonished when I took him to a little local show where they had slat board stalls where he could get his head over the top of the walls. He wasn't in that stall 10 minutes before he latched onto the top board and cribbed away. I had owned him over a year by then and had taken him to show after show but never where he could get his head over the stall wall...until that particular show. He has never cribbed since then so I could only believe that the right opportunity presented itself to him that day.
    Susan N.

    Don't get confused between my personality & my attitude. My personality is who I am, my attitude depends on who you are.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2005
    Posts
    175

    Default

    We had two. One was a very bad cribber, cribbed on anything and everything. Was so bad that he could not be controlled with a collar so we took it off. And he actuality did not do it as much. I think it was because he came to our personal farm and was able to be turned out for most of the day and relax. We also feed him off a pan on the floor and put his water on the floor as well. That being said he was a fantastic horse and would love to have another one like him.

    The other one we still have and he can be controlled with a collar but he is retired and we just took it off. I think it annoying but would not pass on a horse because he cribbed.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2001
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    16,873

    Default

    My first horse was a cribber and I don't think it's a big deal. Like some other posters, I didn't know he was a cribber until we brought him home. He wore a collar for several years, but it did cause pretty bad rubs and we just left him nekkid. He would crib after he ate grain, and had a special board in his pen to crib on.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2005
    Location
    Upper Midwest
    Posts
    5,833

    Default Where do you board?

    My horse is a raging, raging cribber. He has never had a colic issue though (I do daily wormer program through the vet too). I would still have gotten him knowing what I know now.

    I have had issues with barn owners who won't even let a cribber board at their barn though. I've posted about it before...



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug. 2, 2004
    Location
    Whidbey Is, Wash.
    Posts
    9,807

    Default

    Thanks everyone. The seller told me before I even tried him that he was a cribber, and at first I was like, "well, shoot, there goes that." But then I started looking at him and liked what I saw, though he is several inches taller than anything I would have considered before. Then I rode him. He's a greenie, but boy he's NICE.

    After we untacked him and she put him in the stall, he went right to his dutch door and started cribbing; the seller said, "yep, there he goes..." and put the collar him. He turned around and went right to his hay.

    I already talked to my (wonderful, wonderful) BO about it, because she has been beside me for a lot here recently. She cried with me when I put my old mare down, and she understand that even though I love my young mare, and she loves her as well, we don't click very well AND I have some serious emotional issues with the mare and really just need something totally different to get rid of the lingering depression. When I told her he cribs, but that it's controlled with a collar, she said she was fine with it.

    Now I'm just waiting on a call back from the seller to make my offer
    COTH's official mini-donk enabler

    "I am all for reaching out, but in some situations it needs to be done with a rolled up news paper." Alagirl



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Feb. 26, 2007
    Posts
    454

    Default

    I've never had a "confirmed" cribber. I have a few spots around the barn that have been chewed on but it is so inconspicuous I can't figure out who is doing it.

    I recently bought a cribber. He is imported and we had a choice of 4-5 other horses of his caliber that did not have this vice. We chose the cribber and it has not been a problem. He wears a collar when he is boarded and when he comes home to pasture, he does not wear a collar. He is in perfect body condition. I can't say it doesn't annoy me but every horse I have has an annoying trait. He has many attributes that far out way the cribbing.

    We happened to take a clinic from a clinician from Germany. I mentioned that he was a cribber and he stated "North Americans are far too concerned about cribbing". In his mind, it was not an issue. That definitely put my mind at ease.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Sep. 8, 2007
    Posts
    2,899

    Default

    I've had many cribbers, and I would have missed out on a lot if I had passed them by. I really don't see it as that big of a deal. I think people always say that cribbing caused their horse's colic or ulcers, but there is no real way of knowing that. Colic and ulcers are also a problem in tons of horses who don't crib, so to blame it on that just doesn't add up to me. My current gelding is a cribber, but he wears a miracle collar and quits immediately when it is put on. I would not pass up a horse just because of cribbing.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jun. 30, 2005
    Posts
    2,185

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bludejavu View Post
    It doubt if your horse truly learned it from the cribber next to him. Certain horses will not crib except under certain conditions and it might be that he was just uncomfortable enough where you sent him, or where he was stalled, to bring out the habit. I bought a 10 year old gelding at a sale about five years ago who has become a family horse because of his terrific personality. He never cribbed at home and I was quite astonished when I took him to a little local show where they had slat board stalls where he could get his head over the top of the walls. He wasn't in that stall 10 minutes before he latched onto the top board and cribbed away. I had owned him over a year by then and had taken him to show after show but never where he could get his head over the stall wall...until that particular show. He has never cribbed since then so I could only believe that the right opportunity presented itself to him that day.
    We will never know unless someday he starts talking. It sure seems like common sense to me that a horse that has never cribbed a day in his life starts cribbing after being put next to a cribber. This horse is a very talented reined cowhorse who was in a training barn situation for several years of his life so being in training for a tune up shouldn't have been nerve racking to him. Regardless he is now a cribber!!



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Mar. 29, 2008
    Location
    Washington State
    Posts
    163

    Default

    Once apon a time I said I would never have a cribber.
    Now I have one. He's great, he will crib if he's stalled and doesn't have a collar on . I keep my horses at home, and this horse is perfect in every other way....
    I do think that a horse with vices is more difficult to sell. If you are looking for a resale I would really re-consider, especially with this poor market.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2004
    Posts
    1,453

    Default

    I'll join the crowd that says "I thought I would never own one but now I do!" I have a horse that cribs - and he was kept out 24/7. But he is controlled with the collar. Many people feel they just get bored easily and are highly intelligent - this guys holds true for both statements. I wouldn't trade him for the world



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jun. 30, 2006
    Location
    Middle Tennessee
    Posts
    4,883

    Default

    My filly grew up to be a mild cribber, go figure.

    The only problem I have with her cribbing is the stigma associated with it. I keep a plain leather strap on her out of courtesy since I board with people who are scared their horses will "catch" cribbing. (Which has been proven to be a fallacy time and time again...) Also, my filly gets wrongly accused of fence damage even though she's turned out with a bunch of termite wood chewers.
    Don't fall for a girl who fell for a horse just to be number two in her world... ~EFO



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