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  1. #1
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    Default Supplementing for increased energy?

    Do you feed/supplement for increased energy? What do you use and how has it worked for you?

    I have a young warmblood cross with no "go". I'd love a tiny bit more energy in her but I don't want to end up with too much go! A friend suggested I try feeding calf manna.



  2. #2
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    Young WB cross most likely means it's a training issue.

    But, you should evaluate the diet to see if 1) there's enough total protein (think around 700gm, maybe a bit less) and 2) enough amino acids (I'd guess in the 30-35gm range of Lysine for that horse, depending on size).
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  3. #3
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    Oct. 19, 2005
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    Default

    Perhaps the horse needs actually less. Could be that she has a mild version of EPSM for example. Or it could be that she's lacking some minerals and/or selenium.



  4. #4
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    Jan. 5, 2003
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    I could loan you some of my TB's energy! Or you could try Liquid 747 - always worked great for my older guys.
    She wasn't running away with me, I just couldn't stop her!



  5. #5
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    Default

    I would first try a feed with a slightly higher protein content.



  6. #6
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    One has to be careful in saying just "use a feed with a higher protein content" for several reasons. One is that because higher protein feeds tend to be higher in calories, one usually has to reduce the amount fed in order to keep the calories about the same, if that is a potential problem (ie a horse already in good weight, or already borderline fat). But in doing that, you reduce the amount of the rest of the nutrition, most likely.

    One also needs to look at exactly what is making up the protein % of the feed. The % listed is usually crude protein (based on nitrogen content, not amino acids), so increasing from 14% to 16% isn't necessarily increasing the amount of usable protein.

    A cheap way to add quality protein, which is usually just lysine, perhaps methionine, as the rest are generally in adequate amounts from forage, is to add a lysine-only product (KV Vet, Valley Vet, many others carry lysine-only products) or something like Tri-Amino from Uckele.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  7. #7
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    Jul. 19, 2003
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    Default

    I agree with JB. When I hear "my horse has no go" I think, "teach her horse to get off your leg!" The next thing I think is bloodwork, as often time lethargy is a good indication of something important being out of wack.

    Amazingly, I never feel that any of our horses have "no go" and need more energy...then again, all our horses know what the leg means, and if they respond with "I've got no go" they get reminded that they do, in fact, have go.



  8. #8
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    Oct. 15, 2007
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    Default

    purina athlete.
    about a quart a day.
    i use it as a suppliment on my horse.
    i love it. its helped us alot.



  9. #9
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    Nov. 8, 2006
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    After 2 years of having a super laid back horse, after some blood work my vet said he was anemic and a month after adding a 1.5 dose of Iron Power he's now a medium energy horse! It's awsome!!

    Of course you should never add iron to a horses feed without monitoring levels through blood work since excess iron would be toxic. This may be something to ask your vet about and shoudn't cost you more than $50 at a more expensive clinic and more than $150 for a more comprehensive blood work up, which is what I would suggest. You should also check for blood protien levels however, if you just give extra protien it is not harmful to your horse as long as the kindeys are functioning well, but kidney function can be looked at in a blood test too



  10. #10
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    Jun. 23, 2005
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    North Carolina
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    Default

    I have a WB gelding who just needed a bit more "spark", so I started giving him Purina Athlete, just about 1 cup AM and PM, mixed in with his normal beet pulp and oats.

    It gives him just the right amount of spark without being overkill....it also gives him an added edge and makes him more spooky, but I can deal with that better than feeling like I'm riding a slug!!
    The more you stir the $hit, the more it stinks.



  11. #11
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    Jan. 12, 2008
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    Default

    Be careful about supplementing individual amino acids...several amino acids "compete" for the same transporter that moves them from the gut into the horses body. Oversupplementing with one amino acid could crowd out the competing amino acids and lead to a deficiency of the competing ones.



  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by cleozowner View Post
    Be careful about supplementing individual amino acids...several amino acids "compete" for the same transporter that moves them from the gut into the horses body. Oversupplementing with one amino acid could crowd out the competing amino acids and lead to a deficiency of the competing ones.
    Agree. But that goes for supplementing anything

    Lysine is a biggie, and if people sat down with an analysis of their forage, figured out how much lysine there horse was getting from that, a large number of them would find they are deficient. The concentrates the horse gets (if any!) may or may not make up the difference.

    I never suggest adding lysine, or selenium, or anything like that, without also suggesting the person take a look at the diet to determine if they are lacking.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  13. #13
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    Default

    Here's what she eats:

    2 lbs. Legends Show & Pleasure 11% twice daily.
    3 flakes Timothy/Grass ( mostly Timothy) hay inside at night.
    Out on grass during the day but just now I'm starting to add hay outside. Not a buffet but 2-3 flakes per horse in the morning.

    No doubt in my mind that it is partially due to training. She can be lazy and stubborn as well.

    I was at a barn a long time ago where every horse got Lysine added to thier diet. They had no grass, could that be why they added the Lysine?



  14. #14
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    Sep. 13, 2002
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    fitness**
    training
    age
    and a good low starch diet.

    Progressive and ADM Alliance Nutrition are good.

    Uckele has an amino acid supplement called Tri Amino if you are in the market.
    http://kaboomeventing.com/
    http://kaboomeventing.blogspot.com/
    Horses are amazing athletes and make no mistake -- they are the stars of the show!



  15. #15
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Sparky Boy View Post
    I was at a barn a long time ago where every horse got Lysine added to thier diet. They had no grass, could that be why they added the Lysine?
    Could be. It really depends on how the forage tests, or if someone just feels added lysine is necessary and sees results. Grass/grass hay is notoriously low in lysine. Way low. Not all - some is really high. But even if it's "really high", if it's a big horse who is not eating 40lb of hay, more might still be necessary.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



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