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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar. 25, 2007
    Posts
    66

    Default Do I give up on him? ughh...

    t
    I have had this pony since he was one and shown him in dressage and cts. One HT at a SN level. He is So talented.. BUT he is SO naughty! I am coming to relize that I am not the right rider for him.

    Long story short.. today hacking in the ring, after 15min lunging, 1 hr riding, he was spooky cuz it was windy but nothing major.. then all of a sudden a plastic bag moved and he spun... I can't stay on him when he spins.
    He spun at a HT when we left the gait near the first fence. I get fearful!
    I am too old and have other medical issues to deal with this.

    Am I being stubborn to keep trying? I want to even.. but I want it to be for FUN! How would I market a very talented, stubborn, naughty pony?
    Don't get me wrong. I had 2 dressage trainers tell me that if he got his brain right he has FEI potential. His jump is amazing.

    What price would I ask? I have no idea...



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug. 3, 2001
    Location
    Hagerstown, MD
    Posts
    3,610

    Default

    It's not giving up, it's recognizing that he is not the best match for you. Riding should be a fun experience, not one filled with anxiety. There are tons of other talented horses out there that are a better match and tons of riders that will be a better match for your pony.

    As far as marketing goes: saturate the market. Post him on all the online sites, in any local print magazines you have, on your Area website, etc. If he really is super talanted, somebody will recognize that and come see him. For price, do a search for similar horses and see what they are priced at.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb. 11, 2005
    Location
    Pa
    Posts
    1,607

    Default

    How old is he, how big, what breed, and what has he done competition wise? These would all come into play when trying to price him...
    "A little less chit-chat a little more pitter-pat"



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar. 25, 2007
    Posts
    66

    Default

    right now my arm is killing me and I am thinking of heading into the docs.. YET AGAIN!
    I think there is a rider out there that is his match. Its not me.
    Last edited by Moderator 3; Nov. 5, 2008 at 07:44 PM. Reason: removal of information pushing too close to advertising



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec. 27, 1999
    Location
    Midland, NC, USA
    Posts
    7,233

    Default

    Market him by getting a rider on him who CAN handle him, sending him out to a few events to do well, and then put him up for sale. Unless you are happy with taking bottom dollar in the current economy, I would not even put him on the market until he's shown he can produce some results. Naughty ponies are freebies around here, no matter how nice....

    Jennifer



  6. #6
    Join Date
    May. 23, 2007
    Location
    Southern Indiana
    Posts
    2,539

    Default

    Get rid of him. I've been riding a horse like that for 5 years. He's talented but spooky and defiant and I've tried everything. I just bought another horse because naughty boy has been lame since May and this new guy is a jewel. I'd forgotten how fun it is to ride a horse that is not a fruit loop .



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb. 18, 2005
    Posts
    917

    Default

    Where are you located?

    The market is drastically different depending on your location...



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar. 25, 2007
    Posts
    66

    Default

    After meditating on it.. I have decided to list him. I guess, in a way, I felt like I was failing in some way. I think we just don't click. I get too sacred and don't let him go. I am not tough anymore.
    I need a nice steady horse. I need it to be fun. I adore him and he is SO much fun..but I can't be as consistent as he needs. I think he needs to be 5-6 days a week and in a program. I just can't offer that anymore.

    I am in WI



  9. #9
    Join Date
    May. 5, 2008
    Location
    Scranton, PA
    Posts
    729

    Default

    Hmm, I'm sad that you live in WI, I adore fun and naughty ponies.
    My previous pony would launch himself off the ground like a rocket and go right through my legs...I fell off twice before I learned how to stay on it and then at 12 hands he competed to the Novice level and schooled training.
    Don't feel like you're failing in ANY way.
    There are horses that I just do NOT get along with and hate riding! It's in your best interest and your pony's best interest to find someone that is going to channel his energy in a positive manner and once that happens I'm sure he'll go on to do great things!
    But seriously, you should consider keeping him and shipping him to me and I'll compete him for you.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul. 22, 2005
    Location
    Nor-Cal
    Posts
    910

    Default

    Move on

    Even if it is not all his fault there are too many horses who want to do the job and do not spin!

    Sorry I am in my 40's now and when they talk I listen. I will train many I would not own but man if I am going to own it, it better want to do the job!



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul. 26, 2008
    Location
    Knoxville ,Tn.
    Posts
    149

    Default

    Does your favorite horse jump 10 feet in the air every time he spots a plastic bag fluttering in the wind or some trash on the ground? Spooky horses can be a handful, so I got some tips to help you out.


    Heres a few things you might try to get you pony passed spooking so you wont have to give him up. One old timer told me to tie a plastic bag or even a live chicken to his halter and lunge him , which would probably work to but the following are more realistic

    1. If your pony frightened of his own shadow! He sees scary monsters lurking behind every hedge and thinks that a feed sack is going to bite him.

    Most of the time he's looking around, waiting for something to shy at. Then he snorts and jumps away from the scary object, leaving you a quivering wreck!

    Some horses are naturally timid-it's a natural equine instinct to want to get away from something he thinks is dangerous. But if a horse shies frequently, it might be caused by other reasons, for example:

    High spirits caused but too much energy-giving food and not enough work
    Bad eyesight—maybe the veterinarian needs to check his eyes. Are cataracts obstructing his vision? Quick Tip
    Set up some spooky obstacles in your arena or field at home. Practice walking by them until your horse is "spook-proof."
    A nervous rider who is making the horse tense
    Don't forget, even the most levelheaded characters shy sometimes, so always be prepared. Keep a firm hold on the reins at all times and stay alert to things going on around you.


    Let him investigate.
    2. When your horse shies at something, your first instinct is to turn his had to the scary object, trying to pull him back to it. Turn his head slightly away from the frightening thing and use your leg that is farthest away from the object and push your horse's hindquarters back towards it. See if you can get him to walk by the object several times and then continue on your ride.

    3. If your horse is really upset and seems genuinely scared, don't lose your temper or smack him. This will only make him more excited. Talk to him calmly and urge him forward. If it's safe to do so, let him take a good look at the object. If he wants to put his head down and sniff it, let him. Keep a firm hold on the reins in case he wheels around and tries to run off.

    4. If he really won't go near the object, hop off and lead him over to it. Let him have a good look and a sniff if he wants. Rustle it with your foot several times to show him that it won't bite him!

    When your horse has calmed down, walk away slowly. Don't let him rush off at top speed.


    You might have to get off to get nearer.
    5. If you are riding with a friend on an experienced, calm horse, follow him by the scary thing several times. If your horse is extra nervous, it's a good idea to trail ride with a calm equine companion until your horse is more settled on the trail.

    6. If you spot something that might make your horse shy, stay calm. Relax and take some deep breaths and look past the spooky object. Don't get tense and hang tightly on the reins.

    Keep a soft contact and use your legs quietly on his sides to ride him forward. Give him a pat once he's passed the scary monster to let him know how brave he is!
    One Man's Trash is another Man's Treasure
    Web Site http://home.comcast.net/~trickysplace/farm/farm.htm
    E-mail lazy_e_stables@comcast.net



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar. 25, 2007
    Posts
    66

    Default

    TheHunterKid90- where do you live? I would bring him to you!!



  13. #13
    Join Date
    May. 5, 2008
    Location
    Scranton, PA
    Posts
    729

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dqwannabe View Post
    TheHunterKid90- where do you live? I would bring him to you!!
    I don't know if you want to bring him to northeastern PA....that's a little far.



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