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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun. 18, 2003
    Posts
    509

    Default Post your money saving horse care tips

    I would like to add a list of some money saving horse care tips on my blog - though the economy is slowing I plan to continue to enjoy my horses, what can we do without, what have your substituted or discontinued or how can we save money on horse care
    Risa
    HappyTrailsTrailers



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct. 5, 1999
    Location
    A place called vertigo
    Posts
    12,488

    Default

    Do your own vaccinations. Reuse, recycle. Mend. We just turned a doghouse that the dog refused to use into a rabbit hutch, since I hit the old hutch with the mower. Purchse "101 Jumping exercises," or another similar book and take lessons every other week, instead of weekly. Give your horse (and your wallet) the winter off from lessons/showing. Grow a garden next spring (with giant carrot patch, of course!).



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec. 25, 2006
    Posts
    347

    Default

    I like the idea about growning carrots. I was thinking about doing that.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr. 23, 2006
    Posts
    410

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    Shop around for medical stuff - I buy ranitidine at Sams Club for a fraction of the price the vet sells it for. Elastoplast can be found from sports-medicine suppliers for less than $3 a roll- a far cry from the $40 a vet once charged me for a roll! I usually find big gauze squares - 3x3s & 4x4s - at the dollar store.
    "I gave my life to become the person I am right now. Was it worth it?”



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar. 6, 2007
    Location
    The Whinnery.
    Posts
    785

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Pennyhill View Post
    a far cry from the $40 a vet once charged me for a roll!
    Hopefully you did question that one... and came back with a typo verdict!!
    "Dressage" is just a fancy word for flatwork



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct. 10, 2005
    Location
    in the saddle
    Posts
    4,149

    Default

    Use mouthwash from a dollar store to wash your water buckets and use it on your horse as a liminent.

    Use alfalfa cubes as treats.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr. 23, 2006
    Posts
    410

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Creaghgal View Post
    Hopefully you did question that one... and came back with a typo verdict!!
    alas, no. Thats actually what they usually charge! No make matters even worse, it was such a lousey wrap job I had to take it off and redo it myself. Definitely not my usual vet, just the only one thats available for emergency calls in my area and they know it, so they charge accordingly. Cost to tranq horse, clean small but deep cut above the heel, and bandage was over $600.
    "I gave my life to become the person I am right now. Was it worth it?”



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec. 16, 2007
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    862

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dressage Art View Post
    Use mouthwash from a dollar store to wash your water buckets and use it on your horse as a liminent.

    Use alfalfa cubes as treats.
    Better yet, hand grazing!
    I saw the angel in the marble and I set him free. - Michaelangelo



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct. 1, 2005
    Location
    Sandy, Utah
    Posts
    6,322

    Default

    Well, you don't really need treats. I would venture to say that 90% of the horses getting fancy supplements don't need them. Most horses getting grain don't need it, really. You don't really need anything to clean your water and feed buckets and horses with except elbow grease and time and the right brushes.

    What not to skimp on- the hay. Pay the fair price for first class hay. And don't skimp on what you feed, it is a false economy to underfeed hay to save money- you'll end up paying more than you might have hoped to save in vet bills. And don't skimp on bedding if your horse is stalled- again, false economy.

    I gladly pay the vet to do the vaccinations, so that the vet will come when I really need him/her. I do my own deworming every 8 weeks with a strongid/ ivermectin rotation, spending the money on the dewormers saves you money on that hay (and grain, if really needed).

    Spend the money on the good farrier to do the shoes or trimming. Again, not an economy if the money saved using the lowest bidding farrier costs you more in vet bills (not to mention not being able to ride a lame horse).

    And- spend the money once a year (2x a year for under 5 or aged horses) on dental work. Better horse health, more effective feeding, again money well spent that will save you on feed costs over the long run.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr. 8, 2004
    Location
    The Great, uh, Green (?!?!) North!
    Posts
    3,839

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Pennyhill View Post
    Cost to tranq horse, clean small but deep cut above the heel, and bandage was over $600.
    OMG.
    .
    "Adulthood? You're playing with ponies. That is, like, every 9 year old girl's dream. Adulthood?? You're rocking the HELL out of grade 6, girl."



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec. 15, 2005
    Posts
    1,069

    Default

    Don't use the emergency vet Pennyhill had!



  12. #12
    Join Date
    May. 2, 2006
    Location
    Chicagoland
    Posts
    1,761

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pennyhill View Post
    alas, no. Thats actually what they usually charge! No make matters even worse, it was such a lousey wrap job I had to take it off and redo it myself. Definitely not my usual vet, just the only one thats available for emergency calls in my area and they know it, so they charge accordingly. Cost to tranq horse, clean small but deep cut above the heel, and bandage was over $600.
    Good GOD. That is one pricey bandage.

    Sorry, back to the money saving tips.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun. 23, 2003
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    1,862

    Question Mouthwash?

    Quote Originally Posted by Dressage Art View Post
    Use mouthwash from a dollar store to wash your water buckets and use it on your horse as a liminent.

    Use alfalfa cubes as treats.
    Mouthwash as liniment? That seems like it would be a mess.. and sticky and gross. Is this some special mouthwash without sugar? I've heard of using the rubbing alcohol (clear or the green kind) that you can get at the drug store, but never mouthwash.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec. 11, 2005
    Location
    Southern California - Hemet
    Posts
    1,709

    Default

    Crunchy oat & honey or apple crunch granola bars from the dollar store make good horse treats -- and a back-up snack for me too.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar. 26, 2005
    Location
    Back to Normal.. or as close as I'll ever get
    Posts
    9,605

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    Quote Originally Posted by CarolinaGirl View Post
    Mouthwash as liniment? That seems like it would be a mess.. and sticky and gross. Is this some special mouthwash without sugar? I've heard of using the rubbing alcohol (clear or the green kind) that you can get at the drug store, but never mouthwash.
    I make a homemade brace from equal parts mouthwash, rubbing alcohol & With Hazel (the priciest ingredient) diluted in a bucket of water. I get all the stuff from a Dollar store. If there is any sugar in the mouthwash you'd never know it - not sticky at all.

    A microbiologist friend once told me Listerine is the best antiseptic for the money.

    My tip:
    Dry pasta - $1 for 2 1# bags from said Dollar store - is the cheapest horse treat ever. Doesn't spoil or get sticky in warm weather and they LOFF it!
    *friend of bar.ka*RIP all my lovely boys, gone too soon:
    Steppin' Out 1988-2004
    Hey Vern! 1982-2009
    Cash's Bay Threat 1994-2009



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Nov. 22, 2005
    Posts
    1,639

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    Every once in a while water buckets NEED baking soda, or mouthwash or bleach when they get scrubbed to freshen them up. Mouthwash is actually a very good mosquito repellant!



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Dec. 27, 2006
    Posts
    2,058

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    I am the cheepest horsekeeper around--no supplements, good pasture and good hay (the land is paid for, btw, that helps a bunch).
    No stalls. Run in shed/hay storage. Electric fence. No bedding expense.
    No shoes. Cheap nylon/synthetic tack and saddles. No leather upkeep expense.
    Riding boots are Blundstones from Sierra Trading club. About 80 bucks. They are comfy, wear like iron, and double as everyday walking shoes.
    No lessons, no training, no showing. At age 55 I am probably not going to to be a competetive rider in any discipline.
    No trailer. I am fortunate in that I live where I have access to dirt roads and logging trails. Local hunters (the kinds with rifles who hunt deer) have generously given me access to their properties. They like the idea of having someone keep an eye on their land. Most live a hundred miles or so away. 9 months of the year they arent hunting, and even during gun season most arent hunting during the week, and on weekends most arent hunting at midday.

    Dont buy stuff you dont need. That sounds obvious but a tack collecting habit is a real money waster.

    Finally--the horses I have are just good usin' ponies--not papered, not pampered, good feet and iron constitutions. I'd love an OTTB but dont need to try to maintain a hothouse flower. No blankets.

    Another advantage of practicing white trash horsemanship--I KNOW the upkeep of horses is more money in the long haul than the purchase price, but I am just as happy with my 750 dollar trail horse as I would be with something much pricier, and much likelier to be philosophical (and much more able to buy a replacement horse) if he gets hit by lightning. And the Farm Bureau insurance on him is pretty cheap, too.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Sep. 12, 2008
    Location
    Central NY
    Posts
    734

    Default

    Extend the life of any pieces using velcro by cleaning bits of chaff and hairs using an empty plastic Scotch tape despenser. The toothed part you tear the tape off with makes a perfect "brush" to clean and fluff velcro.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jun. 9, 2006
    Location
    Grand Junction, CO
    Posts
    1,776

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Beverley View Post
    Well, you don't really need treats. I would venture to say that 90% of the horses getting fancy supplements don't need them. Most horses getting grain don't need it, really. You don't really need anything to clean your water and feed buckets and horses with except elbow grease and time and the right brushes.
    Brushes? I just grab a swatch of hay!



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Aug. 14, 2000
    Location
    Rochester,NY,USA
    Posts
    7,495

    Default

    You mean there are ways to save $ with horses?

    I don't have time right now to read all the tips but I'll check in later today.
    Sue
    Back in my day, we didn't have as many warning labels because people weren't so dang stupid!



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