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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May. 31, 2004
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    Newport Beach, Ca
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    196

    Default Vet School Questions

    I'm in my Junior year of my bachelors degree and seriously considering vet school.

    Does anybody have any experiences with colleges they would reccommend?
    Is a 4 year degree required before applying for vet school?

    I'm interested to hear any and every story!



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec. 15, 2005
    Posts
    3,656

    Default

    My daughter recently graduated from vet school so I know a bit about getting in. There are a few brilliant people who get accepted after 3 years of college. Most people who are accepted into American vet schools have a 4 year degree. Some have a masters.

    Pick a college and major that has good acceptance rates. My daughter selected the University of Maryland, College Park's Animal Science BS program because they have a high acceptance rate into American vet schools. All of my daughter's friends who were Animal Science majors at UMD were accepted by American vet schools. She has friends who were accepted at Virginia Tech, Kansas, UC Davis, NC State, Colorado State, UF, U Penn, and other schools.

    The Animal Science program at UMD is a hard program. Many students decided it was too difficult and changed majors to Biology and other Agriculture majors. UMD has a wonderful woman, Elizabeth Weiss, who helps students get accepted into UMD and then helps them plan their careers as they go through school at UMD. You could email her (check UMD's website for her address) and I'm sure she would be happy to give you some advice.

    You can get into vet school after attending any college. It is just easier to get in if you go to a school that offers classes and research opportunities that improve your resume. Some of the vet schools, such as Virginia Tech (www.vetmed.vt.edu) list the grades, colleges attended, majors, and GPAs of accepted students.

    Good luck.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    May. 8, 2008
    Location
    Near Auburn, Alabama
    Posts
    418

    Default

    Susie, unless you are majoring in agricultural or biological sciences, it will be very difficult for you to get accepted into vet school.
    The course work in vet school is very demanding, and you'll need that background.

    I'm most familiar with the program at Auburn University, Alabama. Although technically a student can gain admission with less than a complete four year degree, it is my understanding that such acceptance is not common. Good luck!



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug. 8, 2004
    Location
    Back in the 'nati
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    3,281

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeP View Post
    Susie, unless you are majoring in agricultural or biological sciences, it will be very difficult for you to get accepted into vet school.
    I respectfully disagree. There are a number of people in my class alone that did not have such a major. I am one of them; in fact, I am a non-traditional student that originally got a BA in Theatre and then returned to school 7 years later, going part-time, to fulfill my vet school prerequisites. I also had a very unremarkable GPA the first time around, a 4.0 in all the science prereqs, and a kick-ass GRE score. I got in on my first try.

    That said, it is very difficult to get into vet school in general. Our class had 999 people apply for 140 seats. You need good grades, especially in your science classes. You also need a good GRE score, and a fair amount of veterinary experience. Exact requirements will vary between schools.

    You can find a lot of good information at the Student Doctor Network forums:
    http://forums.studentdoctor.net/forumdisplay.php?f=163

    If you haven't already, I would definitely recommend volunteering or working with a veterinarian to get some experience.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun. 1, 2006
    Posts
    199

    Default

    I also respectfully disagree. There are several people in my class with "non traditional" degrees as well. As in computer science, literature, etc. And they, I expect, are also people that are at the top of my class.

    Also, being a Junior (And so long as youre on track for graduating on time) you'd be applying as a graduate anyway. You've missed this cycle of applications (Oct 1st) so you'd be sending your app in next year (2009) to start in the fall of 2010 (if you get in). So by that time, you'd already be a college grad. So the getting in early is a moot point.

    I highly recommend starting with finding someone who advises prevet students at your school and poking around the aavmc website. You can find the prereqs., admissions, tuition, class size, and statistics of accepted students for each school in the country. Its very helpful.

    www.aavmc.org

    The studentdoctor.net prevet forums are also helpful. Good luck!



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug. 6, 2003
    Location
    Lapeer, MI, USA
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    4,075

    Default

    You don't show a location ... but do you at least have a list of possible universities to consider?

    GOing to each one's website might be the most helpful...



  7. #7
    Join Date
    May. 31, 2004
    Location
    Newport Beach, Ca
    Posts
    196

    Default

    thanks for all the advice! I knew I could count on COTH!

    Yes, I am planning on finishing my bachelors before applying to vet school.

    I live in southern california but am interested in moving for my graduate studies, so I am open to looking at all schools not just those in my area.

    I am currently a history major so it is good to hear some others with non traditional degrees have been accepted.

    I will keep researching on my own, but keep the advice coming! I'd love to just hear some stories about Vet school experiences too!



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct. 26, 2002
    Location
    Youngsville, LA
    Posts
    325

    Default

    Back in the early 90s when I was a prevet major in Texas (organic chem kicked my butt so I had to give up that dream), you pretty much had to go to the vet school that was in your state/region. Texas A&M only had a limited number of spots open for non-region students. Is this still true today?
    Elisha



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb. 7, 2007
    Location
    warm beach, wa & moscow, id
    Posts
    100

    Default

    Yes, schools still reserve spots for their in-state students because even the private vet schools (Tufts, Cornell and Penn) get state funding. It is almost always easier to get into your state school than to get in from out of state (but you will hear of some people who get in OOS and not in state). Not to mention it's CHEAPER to go in-state! Depending on the school, the cost difference between in-state and out of state can be A LOT. Vets do not make a lot of money, so this is certainly something to consider.
    I am going to my state vet school, which is in a location that I do not like at all, because it would have been almost $100k more expensive for me to have gone out of state for four years (due to OOS tuition, and the higher costs of living in many other towns). When you take into account the interest that you have to pay on those loans it's even worse!
    UC Davis is an awesome school! Definitely consider it! You can of course apply to other schools (aavmc.org has good information, also the SDN forums previously mentioned), but definitely do research on starting vet salaries and think about if it would really be worth it to pay out of state tuition.

    also: I was a French & Biology double major...Good grades and hours of vet experience are far more important than major as long as you have the pre-reqs



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul. 20, 2007
    Posts
    286

    Default If you are a California Resident

    Spend as much time working in a clinic as you can, it really pays off.

    And good luck!
    Last edited by sunny59; Apr. 8, 2009 at 04:16 AM.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul. 2, 2003
    Location
    Woodland, Ca
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    6,257

    Default

    UC Davis has a vet school.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan. 12, 2008
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    988

    Default

    I just finished my applications for vet school...so hopefully next spring I'll know where I'm going to get my DVM! *crosses fingers*

    If you have a few schools in mind, I definitely recommend going on their websites this year and looking at their requirements as far as classes go. Most of the reqs are pretty standard (biology, chemistry, etc.), but some schools have odd requirements (for example, Mississippi requires cell bio if I'm not mistaken, NC State is the only school that requires business classes, etc.). That way you can take care of these extra requirements before your last semester senior year.

    GET AS MUCH VETERINARY EXPERIENCE AS POSSIBLE. Try to make it varied, too--large animal, small animal, food animal, laboratory animal, whatever you can get. This really factors in, as well. They want to see that you have a realistic idea of what the profession is like.

    Also, get ready to take the GRE. I took mine in January of my junior year, and it was nice not having to cram it in now like a lot of people are doing at my school. In addition, if the score isn't as high as you'd like, you have plenty of time to retake it.

    Good luck!



  13. #13
    Join Date
    May. 12, 2000
    Location
    NE TN, USA
    Posts
    6,201

    Default

    Ditto Va. Tech.

    Also check out the UT Vet School. GO VOLS!
    “There are two ways to conquer and enslave a nation. One is by the sword. The other is by debt.”
    John Adams



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug. 6, 2003
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    Lapeer, MI, USA
    Posts
    4,075

    Default

    Here in Michigan - the Vet school is Michigan State University in Lansing.

    Besides Cornell in NY... I belive that Morrisville in NY has some type of Ag /Vet program too - not sure what level it is. I've spoken with the Vet that's in charge of the Draft horses there though.

    I've heard great things about the Vet School in Ohio as well... but I bet they are all excellent. Time to start a spreadsheet for each one and begin identifying all the needs and requirements. !! Just what you wanted to do, eh?

    Good Luck!! My vet - who is a farm vet with strong horse knowledge (has his own and his daughter is a vet student and Polo player at Michigan State) .. Anyway - my vet has students with him much of the time. It makes the call a little longer -but it's also informative. Sometimes I feel badly because some students have NO desire to be horse vets... they wanna be small animal vets!! But I guess they have do their rotations. They get to practice on my goats too!!



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