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  1. #1
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    Apr. 14, 2006
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    Question So explain the "deal" on turnout "denier" numbers

    Okay...I understand what the denier numbers represent durability on blankets, but for a midweight, lined blanket is it important to go with a 1200 denier versus a 600 denier?? I know it's about strength and wear quality, but for a non-destructive horse in a moderate/chilly temperature area, who is kept in a stall on foul nights...which do I need?? Thanks.
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  2. #2
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    Aug. 26, 2001
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    Higher denier = tighter weave = more wind proof = more water proof. I ALWAYS buy the higher denier.



  3. #3
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    Higher is always better.

    With a horse that's easy on it's clothes, you MAY be able to get away with a lower denier number.

    Personally, I would never bother buying anything as low as 600.



  4. #4
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    Aug. 5, 2007
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    I agree, the lowest denier I will buy is 1200. Anything lower does not keep out the wind and rain, as much as I like atleast.
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Evalee Hunter View Post
    Higher denier = tighter weave = more wind proof = more water proof.
    Not quite. Denier is a measure of thread weight and has no relationship to how the fabric is woven. Microfiber, for example, has a thread weight of less than 1 denier yet it can be made incredibly strong if you weave it, spin it, or otherwise molecularly manipulate it. Regular polar fleece and wind pro polar fleece share the same denier microfiber, but wind pro is wind resistant and regular polar fleece isn't.

    The most common weave for horse blankets is ballistic nylon, although you do see Cordura or ripstop nylon sometimes (I own a ripstop turnout sheet from Schneider's, for example). The funny thing about ballistic nylon is that, pound for pound, 1050 ballistic nylon woven with two 1050 threads that are spun into one is *stronger* than 1200 denier ballistic nylon or 1680 ballistic nylon. 1680 is made with just one big heavy thread. It's still plenty strong, but it can't compete with 1050 double-weave in the pound-for-pound tear strength department, and that's why you hear people raving about their Rambo/Rhinos.

    On the upside, 1680 denier is cheaper to manufacture than double-weave 1050, which is why it's a good budget choice if you want a blanket that will wear like iron but don't have $200+ to drop on a Rambo/Rhino. When and if my 1050 ballistic Triple Crown midweight bites the dust, I plan to replace it with a 1680 denier Schneider's. For the purposes of horse blankets, I think 1200 denier suits the average turned-out horse just fine, and 1050 double-weave or 1680 are both very suitable for "blanket killing" horses.
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  6. #6
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    Sep. 7, 2006
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    I wouldn't even consider a 600D sheet/blanket. I have the Schneider's Euro Extreme turnout blanket and sheet, which are both 1680D. The blanket has been through 2 winters and looks brand new.



  7. #7
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    Thanks everyone. That was just the info I was looking for!! I have a zillion stable blankets, but needed a turn-out rug for a new horse and needed more info. I can always count on the folks here to know!!!
    www.crosscreeksporthorses.com
    Breeders of Painted Thoroughbreds and Uniquely Painted Irish Sport Horses in Northeast Oklahoma



  8. #8
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    Jun. 1, 2002
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    Indiana
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    I bought a 600d centaur sheet and it's gone 3 years with only a small tear by the tail and is still waterproof. Bought it real cheap off of ebay as an emergency blanket then put it into regular use, surprised the heck out of me that it has lived for so long.



  9. #9
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    Aug. 26, 2001
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    Quote Originally Posted by jn4jenny View Post
    Not quite. Denier is a measure of thread weight and has no relationship to how the fabric is woven. Microfiber, for example, has a thread weight of less than 1 denier yet it can be made incredibly strong if you weave it, spin it, or otherwise molecularly manipulate it. Regular polar fleece and wind pro polar fleece share the same denier microfiber, but wind pro is wind resistant and regular polar fleece isn't.

    The most common weave for horse blankets is ballistic nylon, although you do see Cordura or ripstop nylon sometimes (I own a ripstop turnout sheet from Schneider's, for example). The funny thing about ballistic nylon is that, pound for pound, 1050 ballistic nylon woven with two 1050 threads that are spun into one is *stronger* than 1200 denier ballistic nylon or 1680 ballistic nylon. 1680 is made with just one big heavy thread. It's still plenty strong, but it can't compete with 1050 double-weave in the pound-for-pound tear strength department, and that's why you hear people raving about their Rambo/Rhinos.

    On the upside, 1680 denier is cheaper to manufacture than double-weave 1050, which is why it's a good budget choice if you want a blanket that will wear like iron but don't have $200+ to drop on a Rambo/Rhino. When and if my 1050 ballistic Triple Crown midweight bites the dust, I plan to replace it with a 1680 denier Schneider's. For the purposes of horse blankets, I think 1200 denier suits the average turned-out horse just fine, and 1050 double-weave or 1680 are both very suitable for "blanket killing" horses.
    Thank you for the detailed explanation which clarified many things.



  10. #10
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    Oct. 11, 2002
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    I have found that, on the horse scale, 420D will rip from a bite. 600D will look chewed from a bite, but takes a fence catch to rip. 1200D and above will not rip short of a wreck. Nylon thread is extruded like pasta, from a liquid base, not woven of tiny fibers like wool or cotton thread. As posted above, denier is a measurement of the size of the individual threads.



  11. #11
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    Jn4Jenny --- Wow!! Thanks for that great explanation. That explains why my Rambos last so darn long!



  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Plumcreek View Post
    I have found that, on the horse scale, 420D will rip from a bite. 600D will look chewed from a bite, but takes a fence catch to rip. 1200D and above will not rip short of a wreck. Nylon thread is extruded like pasta, from a liquid base, not woven of tiny fibers like wool or cotton thread. As posted above, denier is a measurement of the size of the individual threads.
    Sorry, but you are wrong. We have 6 geldings who SHRED 1200D blankets with one bite & also shred Rambos & Rhinos with a single bite in the blink of an eye. I am tempted to stop blanketing those boys. They think blanket ripping parties are the most fun ever. Good thing Bartville Harness is nearby so blankets can be repaired multiple times each winter at a modest price.



  13. #13
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    Aug. 30, 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by Evalee Hunter View Post
    Sorry, but you are wrong. We have 6 geldings who SHRED 1200D blankets with one bite & also shred Rambos & Rhinos with a single bite in the blink of an eye. I am tempted to stop blanketing those boys. They think blanket ripping parties are the most fun ever. Good thing Bartville Harness is nearby so blankets can be repaired multiple times each winter at a modest price.
    Have you ever tried putting a PVC/textilene style fly sheet over their blankets? Kensington advertises you can do that with their fly sheet, use it as protection for your blankets.
    Tell a Gelding. Ask a Stallion. Discuss it with a Mare... Pray if it's a Pony!



  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by sublimequine View Post
    Have you ever tried putting a PVC/textilene style fly sheet over their blankets? Kensington advertises you can do that with their fly sheet, use it as protection for your blankets.
    A fly sheet might be an idea. We have used sheets over blankets & it does help - sheet gets torn, blanket survives. We have also tried RapLast which stops the whole party for a short time until the RapLast wears off - which it does, in a day or 2.



  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Evalee Hunter View Post
    Sorry, but you are wrong. We have 6 geldings who SHRED 1200D blankets with one bite & also shred Rambos & Rhinos with a single bite in the blink of an eye. I am tempted to stop blanketing those boys. They think blanket ripping parties are the most fun ever. Good thing Bartville Harness is nearby so blankets can be repaired multiple times each winter at a modest price.
    Yeah, I was coming from a thru the fence scenario of blanket chewing. Your guys seem to have flunked blanketing 101 and should suffer the consequences.
    Only my 2 mares are turned out together with blankets, the geldings would probably do the same as yours.



  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Plumcreek View Post
    Yeah, I was coming from a thru the fence scenario of blanket chewing. Your guys seem to have flunked blanketing 101 and should suffer the consequences.
    Only my 2 mares are turned out together with blankets, the geldings would probably do the same as yours.
    Yes, our geldings definitely "flunked blaneting 101". There are 5 to 7 of them (right now one is living with my niece in VA being a show hunter & another one is at a friend's house working as a companion horse) out in a big field, living like a wild bachelor band, with a big bale of hay so they have all the hay they want, grain once a day, room to run & play. They all think they are retired & the only work they need to do is rip up their blankets.



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