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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan. 8, 2007
    Posts
    520

    Default Turning horses out during hunting season

    Last year, my horse was hit with a stray bullet. I am not turning him out in that pasture this winter when deer hunting season kicks in but does anyone have any trick or words of wisdom of how to clearly mark your horse so hunters will not shoot them?

    I am thinking of spray painting a cotton sheet with bright paint with the word "HORSE" across the side (but with my luck, the hunters do not know how to spell )and attaching florescent halter fuzzies to the halters but I really hate having them turned out with any blankets on. I am sure other Cother's have come across this situation and any advice is welcomed!

    BTW-I live in 'the country' of NC and hunting season is usually 365 days a year, regardless of the posted rules. It gets really intense at the beginning of deer hunting season. Other than keeping my horses in their stalls, and attaching bullet proof vests, I am not sure there is anything I can do to educate some of these hunters that my horses are not deer.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul. 26, 2003
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    708

    Default

    I wonder if putting bells on them would help? Maybe a nice big cow bell? At least it'd prolly scare the deer away



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul. 20, 2003
    Location
    Back in the 9A
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    3,008

    Default

    I think Country Supply or places like that have blaze orange sheets and blankets that you could put on him. That's my biggest fear, especially as my family leases our land to deer hunters each year! Luckily, they don't hunt anywhere near the front of the property, where our horses and houses are.
    Some nights I stay up cashing in my bad luck; some nights I call it a draw. -- fun.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug. 6, 2003
    Location
    Lapeer, MI, USA
    Posts
    4,075

    Default

    There is a lady that used to make "DONT SHOOT" neck bands for horses.

    I tried her website, but it's gone.. I think a bright blanket - anything light colored - a fly sheet even, would be good. But I have a sorrel horse and my pasture used to be the deer run to the apple trees ... I worry about his neck and head being seen as a deer - more than his body.

    I'm pretty confident now in my neighbors being used to him there and I'm surrounded by private property nested in state hunting land.

    Go to a fabric store and buy some blaze orange material and make a neck cover that can be velcroed closed. Or - get some bright orange polo wraps and and wrap that around his neck. Put a brightly colored fly sheet on his body. (I have pale blue, a bright blue, and a gold-colored sheet. He'll wear the bright blue one... ) And if possible, use temp hot fence to keep him close to the barn or house.

    heh heh heh... maybe the BRIGHT PINK fly sheets would be good?



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec. 14, 2005
    Location
    Just east of Short Hill Mtn.
    Posts
    2,705

    Default

    Geez, if my horse got shot last year I would be broadcasting band music, loudly, from the roof of my barn and spray paint "Horse" in neon orange on every horse. Then I'd try to get the local press to take a picture to remind the idiots from last year that they're idiots. They have the responsibility to know the area they're hunting in, and where residences are. Wow. Poor horse. Jingles for a safe and uneventful hunting season for you.
    "Our greatest glory is not in never falling, but in rising every time we fall." - Confucious
    <>< I.I.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug. 11, 2008
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    185

    Default

    I also agree on finding an orange sheet to put on the horses. But I think most of the time when horses get hit by gunfire its usually not that the hunters thought they were a deer but unfortunately the hunters are not practicing good hunter safety and they are not thinking what is beyond their targets.

    If possible I would suggest leaving the horses in and maybe do night turn out during the gun season. Not sure how long your season lasts but here its really only two weeks depending on the location. The horse might suffer a bit, but its better then having a dead horse.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan. 8, 2007
    Posts
    520

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CJBean View Post
    I also agree on finding an orange sheet to put on the horses. But I think most of the time when horses get hit by gunfire its usually not that the hunters thought they were a deer but unfortunately the hunters are not practicing good hunter safety and they are not thinking what is beyond their targets.

    If possible I would suggest leaving the horses in and maybe do night turn out during the gun season. Not sure how long your season lasts but here its really only two weeks depending on the location. The horse might suffer a bit, but its better then having a dead horse.
    Unfortunately, the worst time of day for the hunting is after dusk. I guess my neighbor hunter prefers to shoot as the poor deer are creeping out of their hideouts.

    BTW, my horse is a mostly white/brown pinto and we think it was a stray bullet from a high powered rifle that was shot miles away. It still gives me the chills just thinking about how lucky I was he did not die. 1/2 inch in another direction and the bullet would have hit his jugular vein



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2005
    Posts
    175

    Default

    Since you don't want to put a blanket on them maybe put something bright around your pasture fence. I don't really know how you could do it but maybe spray paint wooden triangles and nail them to your fence. It would at least make a hunter look twice. Good luck!



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug. 11, 2008
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    185

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Friesiancross View Post
    Unfortunately, the worst time of day for the hunting is after dusk. I guess my neighbor hunter prefers to shoot as the poor deer are creeping out of their hideouts.

    BTW, my horse is a mostly white/brown pinto and we think it was a stray bullet from a high powered rifle that was shot miles away. It still gives me the chills just thinking about how lucky I was he did not die. 1/2 inch in another direction and the bullet would have hit his jugular vein
    Yikes a roony! I think that is all the more reason to leave the horses in, especially if you believe the shot came from miles away.

    Here in WI I'm pretty sure its illegal to be hunting truly at dusk, I know each day the hunting times gets shortened because of the amount of daylight in the day.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun. 12, 2007
    Location
    CT
    Posts
    7,352

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    Don't turn the horse out until 9-10 am, bring in an hour before sunset.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct. 18, 2000
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    8,501



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar. 30, 2004
    Location
    WA State
    Posts
    3,047

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    Oh jeez, worried about the horse? I'm worried about YOU SO glad I don't live in a hunting area... Hoping that your horsie has a very uneventful hunting season
    Somewhere in the world, Jason Miraz is Goodling himself and wondering why "the chronicle of the horse" is a top hit. CaitlinAndTheBay



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun. 18, 2008
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    28

    Default Hunter Orange

    This is what my boy wears when we go hiking through the woods. He's only a yearling so I don't ride him yet. Some of the girls at the farm where I keep him laugh at the bright orange. I say... "whatever!" I am a club officer at the local archery club and if you saw some of the guys that shoot at our club - YOU would be wearing orange all the time!

    I love the orange halter! Since he wears his halter out in the pasture also, it makes it easier for me to see him within the other 50 horses he lives with.

    http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b3...sticOrange.jpg



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec. 30, 2002
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    974

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    Quote Originally Posted by whaat View Post
    Since you don't want to put a blanket on them maybe put something bright around your pasture fence. I don't really know how you could do it but maybe spray paint wooden triangles and nail them to your fence. It would at least make a hunter look twice. Good luck!
    Unfortunately that doesn't stop a lot of hunters. They'll see the fence, but if the see a deer or whatever inside the fence, I'm sure most of them wouldn't hesitate to shoot it.

    My boyfriend rents a house on a cattle farm. One day last week, 2 men pulled into the driveway and came to the door to ask if they could shoot pigeons. BF told them "no" because #1 it's not his property and #2 there are cattle RIGHT there where they wanted to shoot.

    BF thought the guys were gone, so he came back inside. I glanced out the window a few minutes later to see their SUV still parked there in the driveway beside my car. I watched them for a few minutes, then saw the driver get out again and go for his gun. I sent the BF out again. He threatened to call the police this time. The cattle are RIGHT there. Like 100 yards away with just a strand of electric around them. And to top it all off, the bull had gotten out and was enjoying some grass in the backyard. I was so hoping that this was a very dominant, protective bull and that he'd at least make that roaring bull warning noise they make. He didn't seem to care, though

    Anyway...hunter proceeds to tell BF that he just wants to "scare" the pigeons. And ignores the BF's warning and walks towards the pigeons (and cattle) minus the gun. He gets within a few feet of the pigeons and they fly towards the cattle where they were safe. I know if they'd flown into a nearby field that this mad hunter dude would have pulled out his gun and run after them. I've never seen someone go to such lengths to shoot a pigeon. What does he do in the city when he sees a pigeon??? Wow. I was just so shocked by his nerve.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug. 11, 2008
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    185

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by glitterless View Post

    Anyway...hunter proceeds to tell BF that he just wants to "scare" the pigeons. And ignores the BF's warning and walks towards the pigeons (and cattle) minus the gun. He gets within a few feet of the pigeons and they fly towards the cattle where they were safe. I know if they'd flown into a nearby field that this mad hunter dude would have pulled out his gun and run after them. I've never seen someone go to such lengths to shoot a pigeon. What does he do in the city when he sees a pigeon??? Wow. I was just so shocked by his nerve.
    WOW, I can't believe this happened, I know there are many times people hunt on other people's land without permission to do so, but usually they try to hind that fact. But to do this right in your driveway and they just spoke to your BF, that is utterly crazy. At that point I would have grabbed my shot gun and told them to get the hell of my property.

    It is sad that there are irresponsible and ignorant hunters out there setting a bad name for the MANY responsible hunters. Just a shame.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Sep. 10, 2008
    Location
    Apex, NC
    Posts
    85

    Default

    I live in the country of NC, too. I found blaze orange Davis bell boots at Valley Vet I think, and blaze orange (truely glow in the dark, hurt your eyes!) turnout sheets, I think at Chick's. A horse about a mile away was shot and killed last season, and I don't want mine to be next. I use turnout blankets all winter, haven't had problems yet. Oh, yeah- hunting season started about a month ago in NC for primative weapons like bows and muskets.
    Last edited by Im Natives Last; Oct. 17, 2008 at 10:57 AM. Reason: Reminder that season has started!!



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Apr. 11, 2001
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    6,966

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Friesiancross View Post
    ...we think it was a stray bullet from a high powered rifle that was shot miles away.
    There isn't a deer rifle made that can shoot a bullet "miles." Several hundred yards max.

    I would suggest that perhaps the most useful thing you could do is educate yourself. The bullet most likely came from an adjoining property. Have you contacted your neighbors? It is also illegal everywhere I know to hunt deer after dark. If you actually knew the laws you could have an intelligent and meaningful conversation with your neighbors, your state wildlife management as well as law enforcement.

    "Adult males with hunting licenses" as a simple demographic has been found to be one of the most law abiding demographic of men you can create. Most hunters dislike people who hunt unsafely or illegally more than you do. If you approach this problem like they are a bunch of crazy rednecks and say stupid things like the "bullet came from a mile away" I don't imagine you'll get very far in dealing with them.

    If it were me, I'd be using a blaze orange sheet on my pony, sending polite certified letters to my neighbors to let them know of the problems on their land and developing a positive relationship local law enforcement and wildlife management.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    May. 15, 2006
    Location
    Eastern WV Panhandle
    Posts
    1,246

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    Quote Originally Posted by subk View Post
    There isn't a deer rifle made that can shoot a bullet "miles." Several hundred yards max.
    My Remington 700 .308 is doped to 1200 yards, well over half a mile. It could probably be accurate for longer distances, but the scope doesn't dial up any higher. A miss from a high-powered rifle can - and will - travel for miles, which is why a good backstop is so important.

    Ethical, safe, and law-abiding hunters only take safe shots. They also abhor poachers as much as anyone in rural areas. Goodness knows I've had issues with poachers on my land, and not always during hunting season. Fortunately my local DNR guys are great; there's just not enough of them.

    During the season most people I know keep their horses in during the day and turn them out again well after dark, or if the horses are out, they're in a pasture along a major road where you're not likely to find hunters.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Apr. 11, 2001
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    6,966

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    [QUOTE=gieriscm;3586703]My Remington 700 .308 is doped to 1200 yards, well over half a mile. It could probably be accurate for longer distances, but the scope doesn't dial up any higher. A miss from a high-powered rifle can - and will - travel for miles, which is why a good backstop is so important.[
    In perfect wind and perfect topography yes, you might get a single mile, but "miles"? No. Perhaps you're thinking of shoulder mounted rocket launchers?



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Aug. 9, 2007
    Posts
    9,961

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    What happened to your horse is exactly why I worry every deer season in Georgia.

    Before I get flamed by the hunters, let me say that my father hunted all of his life, but he didn't hunt deer with dogs or deer stands or on public land. And he didn't drink while hunting. But he told me all the horror stories and my grandmother's retired milk cow was killed by a deer hunter on posted land.

    I'ts not just the "stray" bullets, it's the intentional shots by hunters who shoot at everything, including anything wearing orange.

    At one barn, a deer was killed on private problem right by the pasture in an area of 10 acre residents, and a paint who boarded there went beserk. C&C were even upset, cause the deer was left right by the fence to their pasture.

    Cloudy and Callie had been boarded around gun clubs for years and never freaked about guns.

    Then we had the short time at a barn where the family owning the and pulled guns on each other in a pasture, so it's not just hunters who are the danger.

    At the previous barn, I went out and got C&C on Saturdays and Sundays and brought them into the barn and stayed with them. Too many people shooting around the 40 acre pasture, and I had one bay and one grey/white horse.

    Better safe than sorry. I think maybe orange will help, like the orange vests for dogs, but anything white or brown or whatever can get blasted by the irresponsible.

    If all the hunters walked thru the woods like my father did, and didn't stand by their trucks on the side of the road waiting for dogs to run deer to them, maybe they'd have more enjoyment of the woods and hunting.



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