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  1. #41
    Join Date
    Apr. 7, 2006
    Location
    Joplin, MO
    Posts
    491

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    I rent a farm, and board out my gelding at a show barn. If things get "bad" I can bring the show horse home and save quite a bit right there. If things get really, really bad, my parents own 80 acres and my boyfriend's family owns thousands, so my ponies would get to turn feral. What fun for them!

    Frankly, though, I'm in a luxury retail business and we really haven't seen any noticeable decrease in sales. As long as gas is falling, the average mddle class american, with a secure job and a steady paycheck is spending just as much as ever, IMO.
    Last edited by CurlyLindsay; Oct. 13, 2008 at 07:51 PM.



  2. #42
    Join Date
    Aug. 22, 2005
    Posts
    3,788

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    Quote Originally Posted by BuddyRoo View Post
    the eating.

    But for those not offended...we lined them up by how "easy keeping" they are. As a result, the TB, Arab, and Paint will go in that order (as that's the order in which they require food from most to least). The pony and my Arab/Morgan/QH fatty fat fat would go later as they are easier to keep.
    I lined mine up by potential usefulness. Now that the two oldest ones (one arthritic and the other just a fruit loop but perfectly sound until she dropped dead) have gone and died on me, tops on the list is the shithead gelding, who although an air fern, is bound and determined to remain as useless as possible. However, he'd probably be ok as an only horse, so he might have a future with somebody else as cheap transportation.

    Next is two twenty-two year old fruitloops who couldn't get their head wrapped around the concept of "working". They'd get a chance to prove they weren't useless if push came to shove. Maybe they could be plow horses and earn their keep.

    After that, I'm really torn. My current eldest (26) is also my bestest, but she's getting arthritic in her old age. My two twenty year olds are my next bestest and would still have some use as working animals. My two stallions are young enough to be good transportation so would be last on my dinner list. (With the twenty year olds and the stallions, I'd have a matched four-horse hitch. Maybe I could start a stage line!)



  3. #43
    Join Date
    Jan. 27, 2007
    Posts
    285

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    I have been thinking about this a lot myself and have been cutting out the "fat" from the horse budget and personal budget.
    Do the bare minimums horsekeeping wise. Make sure I can secure a regular supply of hay. Alreadly have learned how to trim their feet.
    If it gets so bad that I cannot care for them adequetly I will have them put down.
    Depressing, yes. I do have hope that God will provide though.



  4. #44
    Join Date
    Sep. 17, 2007
    Location
    Cloverdale, Ca.
    Posts
    1,614

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nezzy View Post
    i'd go hungry as long as possible( and live off my fat).

    But if it got that bad, i'd put him to rest. Can't let him suffer.
    Me too~! That's the funniest post I've read in a LONG time! Most of us are too fat.

    Anyway, the next best thing is to buy a few chickens. Honestly, they're magic animals! You give them your garbage and they give you food!!! It just doesn't get any better.

    As for my horses, I think I'll hook up Bravo, my stallion who I've spent a vulgar amount of money on, to a plow and make him help me grow hay for HIS mares. Time to earn his keep.

    I think this economy is going to get a lot worse, but most of us have a ton we can cut back before we start to starve. Maybe this is a great thing to happen for some of us??? So many people worshipping ALL the crap they can acquire! Me included. Now maybe we'll turn back to our lovely creator and our families.

    There's something very wrong with a society where almost EVERYBODY you know is on anti-depressants! Gee, fabulous economy, everybody owns a house, a new car (Beamer or Mercedes), everybody pulling their hair out. Makes ya wonder.

    Something good may come of this yet. They say God never takes anything away without giving something back. So lets start looking for our gift.
    Chris Misita
    www.hiddenvalleyfarms.net Home of Bravo and Warrick!
    To dare; progress comes at this price. All sublime conquests are, more or less, the rewards of daring.
    Victor Hugo



  5. #45
    Join Date
    Aug. 3, 2006
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    1,369

    Default off my chest...

    Reading this thread really shows just how great we've had it...honestly. Almost every facet of most peoples' lives-including my own-is a luxury as opposed to true real 'survival'. Even in a bad economy right now, we have running water, plumbing, and a fridge to keep our food from spoiling, warm blankets for the night.

    I gave my boy away to a great home, sold the trailer, stop spending $$ for stuff I really and truly don't need. I limit myself to a certain amount of groceries each week and got a part time job at the pet store to help pay for my dog's food and vet care (vet gives discount for workers). I feel like this is a great opportunity to remember how much is actually useless and unimportant...how self reliant we can all be and how far we've gone from that way of being. It’s really a shame to pay someone for something you can do-I bought an old frame bed b/c I'd been sleeping on a couch-did some research online and w/ a few tools put a platform bed together w/ a futon mattress. It’s just fine.

    I don't mean to 'rain on people's parade' or make an snippy comments about this thread but reading most of the posts I thought to myself-it made me realize it about my own life too-that most of us have it so good that we don't even notice it. We think of cutting supplements-something a lot of horses could easily go without their whole life-dropping the super expensive premium feed-I know so many horses that exist on seasonal grass, some timothy hay, and a scoop of oats a day and they are fat, happy horses-putting horses out to pasture-most horses are happiest out grazing like they're meant to-and etc. I'm not a 'return to nature' nut, I'm just commenting that most horses prefer the less glorious lifestyle anyway. The happiest horses I've seen are the pasture horses, horses who have shelter in rain and snow, but are free to stand in it when they want-they don't have ulcers, they don't have stocked up legs, they are happy, fit horses. We're-I include myself, of course-so conditioned to anthropomorphize our animals and project our ideas of comfort that I think sometimes they actually suffer for it.

    Again, just commenting on my own way of looking at things as well as the other posts that I've read. I've enjoyed reading the thread b/c it reminds me to be smart with my money. I'm very young, just starting out with my life-aka college student- and lucky in that my truck is paid for, my computer paid for, my dog will have a place at my side his whole life-I don't have a family that makes moving or taking extra jobs difficult and I made the decision to let my horse go a few months ago, so I'm just offering to volunteer for an equine learning center around here for a horsey fix until I get back into school this spring. I've enjoyed paring down-I really and truly believe the more we Americans can pare down and 'tighten our belt' the better it will be for our values. Would it be so bad to return to a time when we waste less, eat less, use less, expect less and are content?

    Just my 2cents.
    sh22

    ETA-I just paid rent to share half of a small house two minutes from downtown. I can walk my dog to a big park, in the winter I can practically ski to the national forest, I can walk to the grocery store, my work is seven minutes from the house, school is twelve minutes from the house. I try to think as efficiently as possible these days-I figure I want to hike for exercise, well, walking to errands can certainly help in that area. No reason for me to jump in the car when it takes a few extra minutes to walk. I guess its just a mindset we all have to use a little more.
    True Bearing Equestrian
    St. Helena Island, SC



  6. #46
    Join Date
    Aug. 10, 2008
    Location
    Statesboro, GA
    Posts
    1,230

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    We have already started to cut down, gave away or sold for dirt cheap price five of the six horses we wanted to move, so we are left with eight, one we have on loan and could return to owner, one we'd like to sell, so that we just have six.

    How would I cut down.....Well, I give lessons, so my daugher could keep on riding, but we would cut out shows first. Then shoes, and Lisa would need to learn to trim her own. Can you imagine the farriers that will be out of work if the 'trim your own' trend continues? Sheesh! We are already frugal in a lot of ways. Our horses stay out a lot, come in for grain and go back out, and we went in with our dear friend on hay, got 1000 bales of oat hay for less than $2 per bale. We got some large round bales locally for $30 per bale by paying cash and not asking for an invoice.

    My husband is retired, we have two retirements, one from Martin Marietta and one from the University of Georgia system, plus his social security, so those are pretty secure. We have a joint household with my daughter and her husband, who is a Lt. Col. full time in the guard/reserve in the Air Force. He's got a very secure job.

    But grain has gone up. Hay has gone up. Farrier has gone up. Vet has gone up. Diesel is out of sight absurdly high. Fifteen years ago on the way to a show in Alabama I gripped because diesel was UP to $0.86 per gallon. Locally one place is selling it for $3.95, most others are $4.18 or $4.19 a gallon.

    Two of our horses are broke to drive but we have a single harness meant to pull a light two wheel show cart, nothing that would pull a plow. My son in law is VERY capable and could hunt well for venison, we have 54 acres and could grow a garden but I don't think it will get that bad. I sure hope not. I am in remission with cancer right now, and health care is really important to me!

    We have some horses we would/could sell but two older guys are both 17 and my grandsons love them, I would put them down before I let them starve but otherwise they have a forever home.



  7. #47
    Join Date
    Jul. 27, 2007
    Location
    Behind the Orange Curtain
    Posts
    9,694

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    Spirithorse, I'm with ya. I feel a sense of wonder every time I look at my life, even with the current changes. Even if I'm forced to sell one of my horses (a real possibility right now), I can't bring myself to be bitter about it. Sad, yes, but knowing that so much of the world lives without even what we consider basics- it's hard to really be bitter that we're getting a bit of a reality check.

    I was raised by poor hippies, though, so this whole suburban thing is all a big deal to me anyway I've lived in my house 13 years and still walk in every day thinking "wow, I can't believe I live here!" (it's nothing special, either. It's just a house, LOL!).

    We're way better off than most. Let's all hope things take a turn for the better soon (the stock market sure did today... wtf is up with that?)



  8. #48
    Join Date
    Aug. 3, 2006
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    1,369

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ambrey View Post
    Spirithorse, I'm with ya. I feel a sense of wonder every time I look at my life, even with the current changes. Even if I'm forced to sell one of my horses (a real possibility right now), I can't bring myself to be bitter about it. Sad, yes, but knowing that so much of the world lives without even what we consider basics- it's hard to really be bitter that we're getting a bit of a reality check.

    I was raised by poor hippies, though, so this whole suburban thing is all a big deal to me anyway I've lived in my house 13 years and still walk in every day thinking "wow, I can't believe I live here!" (it's nothing special, either. It's just a house, LOL!).

    We're way better off than most. Let's all hope things take a turn for the better soon (the stock market sure did today... wtf is up with that?)
    Yeah, I feel like I'm getting closer to the hippy edge myself, actually. I keep cutting things out and its like this breath of fresh air every time. lol I feel like at 20 years old, I've made some good life decisions-totally changed my life, moved across the country, am going to try giving back a little more than before, going to try to be more self reliant rather than so compliance about letting others do for me or letting my parents' money do for me-sometimes its lonely but I know I just need to get out and meet more people, do more things. My neighbors have a huge-like full scale, liveable- teepee that they actually live in periodically. Its got a futon in there. Lots of fire wood too.

    Btw, one of my most prized books is 'Letters and Essays' of Albert Einstein. Pretty hard to beat for great reading.
    True Bearing Equestrian
    St. Helena Island, SC



  9. #49
    Join Date
    Sep. 17, 2007
    Location
    Cloverdale, Ca.
    Posts
    1,614

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    what's the name of the book by Einstein? I can't find it.
    Chris Misita
    www.hiddenvalleyfarms.net Home of Bravo and Warrick!
    To dare; progress comes at this price. All sublime conquests are, more or less, the rewards of daring.
    Victor Hugo



  10. #50
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2004
    Location
    woodstock, ga
    Posts
    845

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    Well, I feel like I've already been living it for the last year. I was (uh-hum) in the mortgage business for years. We got hit hard and we were the first layer of the house of cards to go. But while I miss shopping at Nordstroms, and still wish for Bobbi Brown makeup while buying Maybelline--I have my 2 horses and I can support them with my part time job. So my husbands income pays the regular bills, I pay the horse bills and anything horse related. Our jobs are as secure as any job could be right now. I have a trailer I could sell, some jewelry, and parents that would probably help me out if it came down to that.

    Worst case scenario, we sell my daughters horse--he is 7 yrs old and very well bred, I could probably sell him. My horse goes to a dear friend of mine who owns her own barn. We have already made arangements if anything would happen to me, Penni goes to her forever. My mare will not ever be sold, she is a tough one and I would hate for her to ever be put into a bad situation--someone will get hurt or the mare will hurt herself. My friend is a trainer and has been a part of my mares training (the good part) and she owns her half sister--and she loves her--so it would be a win-win situation hopefully.



  11. #51
    Join Date
    Aug. 3, 2006
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    1,369

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    Quote Originally Posted by misita View Post
    what's the name of the book by Einstein? I can't find it.
    Its something like 'letters and essays'...let me go look and see if I left it at home or packed it. I've still got books coming to me. I'll be right back!

    Its a GREAT book.
    Did you check amazon? I got it as a christmas gift a year ago from amazon.com, I think.
    True Bearing Equestrian
    St. Helena Island, SC



  12. #52
    Join Date
    Aug. 3, 2006
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    1,369

    Default got it!

    Found it! Ok, its actually 'Ideas and Opinions'. I knew I'd packed it away for the trip. I have books everywhere though, that's the problem! Here's a link for the amazon copy if you're interested in buying: http://www.amazon.com/Ideas-Opinions...951708&sr=1-26

    I guess I confused the material with the title! Sorry, but its a cool, cool book. Really gives you a taste of his personality-personally, thought he was a pri^& after reading a lot of it-and his genius...just a really interesting book.
    True Bearing Equestrian
    St. Helena Island, SC



  13. #53
    Join Date
    Apr. 7, 2005
    Location
    summerville GA
    Posts
    3,219

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    The fact that people are even talking like this says a lot. I have been here for 8 years now and I cant even begin to describe to you the economic downturn I have seen in the US from the first time I came here. When first I came, there were signs all over for help wanted. It blew my mind how booming this country really was. Kids never worked long anywhere cause they could leave one job and head to the other without so much as a see ya later. Now, they will be lucky if they can find a job at all.

    I think about this often, very often. I can survive off the land but...............these rescues cant. They have no monetary value, they cant be used for transportation or field work. The worse the economy gets for others, the worse it gets for us monetarily and of course, more and more horses need us then. I dont even want to contemplate the day it has to end. I want for these guys to live out there lives here.
    Our horses are not seen as the old and disabled they may have become, but rather as the mighty steeds they once believed themselves to be.

    Sunkissed Acres Rescue and Retirement



  14. #54
    Join Date
    Jul. 16, 2007
    Location
    everything's greener in Arkansas!
    Posts
    948

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    From a lowly DC college student intern:

    I feel very confident that we won't have a major depression. It at least won't happen anytime soon. The US government is trying as hard as they can to make sure it doesn't happen. Since we have a central banking system, I think we will end up doing better than other countries that the economic situation has hit. The stock market seems to be recovering a bit... at least in Asia.

    If my confidence doesn't hold out, then I don't have a clue what I'll do. My father has a very stable job and a horse pasture at home. Our family also has a cattle farm in N GA that's been in the family for generations. I guess I'll somehow get my horses out there and party on 200 acres with barbed wire fencing (yurk!) with any others who want to join. The land has natural springs and all the farming equipment one would want (even some old horse-drawn stuff), so Mark would become a fancy plow horse.



  15. #55
    Join Date
    Feb. 24, 2007
    Location
    At the barn
    Posts
    440

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    Quote Originally Posted by tabula rashah View Post
    Well, I have a slightly different approach- If it came to it, I would get rid of my vehicles and use the horses- I live in Amish county, so there are hitching rails even at our grocery store. Also, everything that I would need is within riding/ buggy distance.
    Me too. We have enough acreage in pasture with a lot of water access, and I know I can feed my herd. As for boarded horses.... we'd see how I might manage that, or if I could. But, we live close to town. I can ride/drive my horses to the store, bank, post office etc. I've wanted for years to get a harness and forecart, as we have some old farm implements that I could use to work a large enough garden to grow food. As it is, we have a nice small orchard, peaches, pears, plums, apricots and a lot of blackberry bushes. Get a few chickens..... might even have enough to sell at the local farmers markets of which there is a major local market in town.

    I love our town. Very agricultural and with a lot of folks, myself included who buy local grown produce and locally raised meats predominately. But, its getting invaded by city folk who don't want the horses, goats, cows etc.... they want to regulate it and build strip malls.

    In some ways, I am actually hopeful that the downturn will help our areas become more appreciative of the agrarian lifestyle and help it prosper.



  16. #56
    Join Date
    Sep. 17, 2007
    Location
    Cloverdale, Ca.
    Posts
    1,614

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    Quote Originally Posted by spirithorse22 View Post
    Found it! Ok, its actually 'Ideas and Opinions'. I knew I'd packed it away for the trip. I have books everywhere though, that's the problem! Here's a link for the amazon copy if you're interested in buying: http://www.amazon.com/Ideas-Opinions...951708&sr=1-26

    I guess I confused the material with the title! Sorry, but its a cool, cool book. Really gives you a taste of his personality-personally, thought he was a pri^& after reading a lot of it-and his genius...just a really interesting book.
    Thank you Spirithorse22. I'm going to order it. I can use some inspiring reading right now.
    Last edited by misita; Oct. 13, 2008 at 11:43 PM. Reason: Edited to add, I put in my order. Can't wait! Thanks!
    Chris Misita
    www.hiddenvalleyfarms.net Home of Bravo and Warrick!
    To dare; progress comes at this price. All sublime conquests are, more or less, the rewards of daring.
    Victor Hugo



  17. #57
    Join Date
    Aug. 22, 2005
    Posts
    3,788

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    Quote Originally Posted by PiaffeDreams View Post
    ... But, its getting invaded by city folk who don't want the horses, goats, cows etc.... they want to regulate it and build strip malls.

    In some ways, I am actually hopeful that the downturn will help our areas become more appreciative of the agrarian lifestyle and help it prosper.
    Well, they'll change their damn tune right quick after their bellybuttons get to scraping on their backbones for a while. Then they'll want to know where the hell their food is at and why people aren't raising it for them. I'd like to be a fly on the wall when their "Duh!" moment hits them.



  18. #58
    Join Date
    Feb. 8, 2004
    Location
    Rolling hills of Virginny
    Posts
    6,015

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    Now G&B, you know food comes from the grocery store, all wrapped up in plastic wrap, and in cans and bottles!

    Ewww, all that icky blood, noise, smells, and hard work? Not in my community!
    Homeopathy claims water can cure you since it once held medicine. That's like saying you can get sustenance from an empty plate because it once held food.



  19. #59
    Join Date
    May. 15, 2006
    Location
    Eastern WV Panhandle
    Posts
    1,246

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    Given that my one and only horse is retired, in his early 20's, needs supplements for his feet and joints, and arthritic, I couldn't sell him since there's really no market for him except the meat truck. If things got bad I'd put him down.



  20. #60
    Join Date
    Aug. 17, 2007
    Location
    Sun Valley ID sometimes, Kentucky SOON
    Posts
    36

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    Euthanize. All of them.

    May come sooner rather than later - just learned this afternoon that my landlord, owner of the farm I've leased for eight years (perfect pay, perfect maintenance, perfect ad nauseum, not that it was ever appreciated) is in foreclosure. I paid him, but he didn't pay it forward.

    So many foreclosures out here that the rental market is basically impossible. Shelters, both human and animal, are overflowing.

    I have 11 acres with safe fences and good drainage, two barns, within a half hour commute to employment centers. I paid really good money for eight years and paid it on time every single month for eight years. Donated maintenance and fronted costs for things that were actually my landlord's responsibility according to the written lease - and never got reimbursed or even a thank you.

    But I knew what I had and I wasn't about to give it up, snarky landlord or not.

    Now I guess I don't have a choice.

    And of course with the really bad attitude toward self-care types - sometimes well deserved, but often not - it's going to be really tough to find a place to keep my elderly misfits with health problems requiring careful dietary management - Cushings, IR, ancient mini with poor teeth, etc.

    Last time I boarded, drunken barn help ran a pitchfork THROUGH the leg of my old retired school horse, a horse so sweet, quiet and gentle he literally had done not a single thing "wrong" in his entire 32 years. Last time I boarded, all my Baker blankets were stolen - the GOOD Baker blankets, from the seventies, carefully and meticulously kept. Last time I boarded, my one show horse had his stall flooded "accidentally on purpose" with ice cold water (January) by a boarder who thought I had turned her in for smoking in the barn AND STUBBING OUT HER CIGARETTE IN THE SHAVINGS. Last time I boarded there were members of another not to be named culture "visiting" this country and using their part time stable employment to run cocaine out of the barn (they were also fond of bringing the tractor into the lighted indoor arena after dark when people were riding and then turning out the lights. Last time I boarded, an irresponsible parent boarder allowed her seven year old to open a stallion's stall door. Last time I boarded....you get the drift.

    Yup. A peaceful death is preferable. For all concerned.



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