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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug. 17, 2006
    Posts
    119

    Default Educate me- Rein Aid

    I thought that it was an interesting concept and wonder if anyone has tried this? (yes I am guilty of window shopping online! I was looking at bridles and came across it).

    The product that I am talking about is here:
    http://www.rein-aid.com/catalog/prod...products_id=28


    Is it worth it? Did you see progress with your horse using it? Or was your horse more danergous? Educate me!



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr. 1, 2003
    Location
    Cocoa, Fla
    Posts
    4,124

    Default

    Bad for dressage - what discipline do you ride and how steady are your arms?

    If you're steady and horse isn't I say no - if horse is steady but your aren't might be nice to keep you from inadvertantly jerking on reins.
    Sandy in Fla.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan. 9, 2003
    Location
    IN
    Posts
    4,182

    Default I used

    I'd kind of forgotten about those. I used them for an OTTB who was super resistent to contact (along with lunging in donut side reins). Worked pretty well and I didn't have any trouble removing them and putting her into regular reins.
    Whatever you can do, or dream you can, begin it. Boldness has genius, power, and magic in it. Goethe



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr. 29, 2005
    Location
    State of Confusion
    Posts
    1,376

    Default

    FYI - illegal to show in for dressage (this includes for longing or warm-up at a show).



  5. #5
    Join Date
    May. 19, 2008
    Posts
    62

    Default

    It does appear to be a neat concept but I can't help but thinking that it really wouldn't work unless a rider had light hands anyway. If the rider is accustomed to keeping continuous heavy contact then I would imagine this wouldn't be any different for them and they'd ultimately keep even heavier contact in order to compensate for the elasticity of the attachment. Then, if the rider has light hands and is able to ride with a giving hand then this attachment wouldn't be needed to begin with. I would think the best thing for a rider is to school themselves to have a light giving hand that is effective and forget attachments.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan. 9, 2003
    Location
    IN
    Posts
    4,182

    Default Oh and to add

    After the mare started getting used to the contact, she did start having a tendency to lean on them. When that started, I switched to regular reins and worked on our half halts. Probably should have switched over earlier. By the time I started taking her for lessons, she was weaned from them. This was earlier in her off the track retraining.
    Whatever you can do, or dream you can, begin it. Boldness has genius, power, and magic in it. Goethe



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct. 9, 2004
    Location
    San Antonio
    Posts
    286

    Default

    I bought a horse that was ridden in those. After I brought her home I couldn't touch her mouth with a single jointed snaffle and my regular reins. She was not steady with contact while using the rein aids, and was 10 times worse without. I switched to a KK Ultra and that helped a lot, but it still took some retraining to get her used to regular reins and maintaining contact. I think that in my mare's case, it did a lot more harm than good, but like another poster mentioned, it might be different with a horse that's steady and a rider that isn't.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul. 27, 2007
    Location
    Behind the Orange Curtain
    Posts
    9,694

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by oldenmare View Post
    FYI - illegal to show in for dressage (this includes for longing or warm-up at a show).
    But the reins with the elastic built in are legal.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec. 28, 2003
    Location
    US
    Posts
    1,966

    Default

    If you felt like you needed those, IMO your money would be better spent on some lunge lessons.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug. 17, 2006
    Posts
    119

    Default

    Seems there's a lot of pros and cons to this product.

    I was curious whether anyone had experience with it and wanted to know about it.

    Not adding this to my list to buy- have no interest in it other than learning about it.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul. 25, 2003
    Location
    Boston Area
    Posts
    8,386

    Default

    I discussed these with my trainer several years ago. I have a horse that does not like to take contact and will curl behind the bit.

    Her opinion was that it was a crutch, rather than a solution. If your problem is that your hands are not giving enough to maintain a light contact with your horse, or that your hands bounce so much that they bother your horse, this product will not teach *you* to develop that contact. If you are talking about putting them on school horses, who have a gazillion novice riders bouncing on their reins, not a bad idea.

    The "cure" for this is to develop an independent seat. So yes, lunge lessons are probably more helpful.

    Edited to add: For this horse, what worked was finding a bitless solution that allowed him to accept "contact" into the bridle and a lot of leg!
    Equine Ink - My soapbox for equestrian writings & reviews.
    EquestrianHow2 - Operating instructions for your horse.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    May. 6, 2006
    Location
    Warren County, NJ
    Posts
    3,597

    Thumbs up I love them

    Quote Originally Posted by Ambrey
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by oldenmare
    FYI - illegal to show in for dressage (this includes for longing or warm-up at a show).

    But the reins with the elastic built in are legal.
    Correct, I have shown in them.

    Well, I guess you either LOVE them or hate them.
    I love them and I would never ride any (of my) horse's without them anymore.
    I have both my dressage horses in them.

    One of my guys is broken at the 2nd neck vertebrae if you don't get the contact right. Tough one to ride, my guess, previous owner rode him hard-handedly.
    The rein-aid is a huge help to this guy to help him trust the riders hand. We've come a long way. I had to take him back to a hackamore and allow him to lean on my hands to some degree rather then shy away from contact and put his nose on his chest. Now I've got him in a french link with worcester noseband and rein-aid and we are getting there.

    My other horse used to be a bit of a pulling jerk (ex hunter, always wanting to just go go go), I wasn't sure if it was all that great for him. But he loves it and I can feel a difference when riding with or without rein-aid.
    Without rein-aid his reaction to half halts are more abrupt.

    Again either you love them or hate them, I for sure wouldn't want to ride without them anymore , so thumbs up from me.



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