The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Results 1 to 20 of 20
  1. #1
    potatochipjunkie Guest

    Default to those of you who are instructors.....

    do you tell the parents when a student falls off or do you just have the child tell their mom/dad?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb. 5, 2008
    Location
    Bluffs of the Broad River
    Posts
    810

    Default

    I think you need to notify the parents, esp if it is a really young child. Also, I have fallen off, had a BAD concussion, had some memory loss and was totally out of it. It is possible my parents would not have known I needed to see a dr without someone talling them.

    (I am not an instructor just for the record...)
    There are stars in the Southern sky and if ever you decide you should go there is a taste of time sweetened honey.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar. 23, 2005
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    4,182

    Default

    I am not an instructor, but I work with kids.

    Yes, you should tell mom and dad - if they don't care, then that's that, and if they are the type, then you have potentially headed trouble off at the pass by calmly and accurately letting them know yourself.

    If it were YOUR kid, you'd far rather get the facts from the adult who is responsible for said kid's safety, right?
    Proud member of the EDRF



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr. 29, 2006
    Posts
    3,434

    Default

    That's interesting because I always assumed coaches told parents.

    When my friend said she learned her 4 year old had fallen off at riding camp - from the 4 year old herself - I did not think that was a very responsible or professional atmosphere to be leaving your child in.

    Certainly, as a parent, if there is an incident at school, day care or day camp, the expectation is that we will hear about it from the adult in charge. Why would it be any different at a riding school?



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar. 13, 2002
    Location
    Columbia, MD USA
    Posts
    2,858

    Default

    Well, of course, you tell the parents about any accident or incident with a child! Be responsible and act professional. Certainly mention a fall, even if it's minor to you. Tell parents even if their child gets his/her toes stepped on by a barefoot small pony. Let the parents make the decisions about what, if anything, to do about it. This advice is coming from an experienced certified instructor.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar. 19, 2008
    Posts
    1,691

    Default

    ALWAYS, ALWAYS, ALWAYS tell the parent yourself!



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct. 14, 2006
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    426

    Default

    When I was a kid, my coach ALWAYS made sure my parents knew I'd fallen off (unfortunately, it happened ALOT )

    She also ensured to remind us to bring the brownies to the following lesson (the rule at the barn was anyone who fell off, had to bring brownies to share as they were now an official member of the groundhog club~ I became a brownie expert!!! )



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar. 19, 2008
    Posts
    1,691

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Seriously_Hunter View Post
    When I was a kid, my coach ALWAYS made sure my parents knew I'd fallen off (unfortunately, it happened ALOT )

    She also ensured to remind us to bring the brownies to the following lesson (the rule at the barn was anyone who fell off, had to bring brownies to share as they were now an official member of the groundhog club~ I became a brownie expert!!! )
    We go for a case of Diet Pepsi



  9. #9
    Join Date
    May. 19, 2008
    Posts
    62

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by potatochipjunkie View Post
    do you tell the parents when a student falls off or do you just have the child tell their mom/dad?
    First from the instructor point of view: tell the parents no matter how insignificant the fall might seem at the time, when it comes to kids you really can't tell how a fall will effect them. They might seem perfectly fine right after the fall and even have absolutely no qualms about getting right back in the saddle but then later they might have nightmares or just have the nerves come and get a grip on them. There have also been cases where a fall has caused an injury that wasn't immediately noticeable. Further, you want parents to trust you and feel like you take the responsibility of their children seriously so if you come clean and tell them right away and also tell them what you did after to help alleviate any potential residual problems then they'll feel better about you in the long run even if they initially get a little upset.

    Secondly from the parental point of view: if you are my kid's instructor, you dog gone well be looking out for my kid's safety and if a fall does happen then I'm going to expect you to handle the situation professionally and with my kid's welfare in mind. If my child is not injured then by all means do what you can to get him back in the saddle and if my child is injured then you need to call me immediately and let me assess the situation. Work with me honestly and constructively and we'll probably not have any future problems, hide something from me and you're likely to see a side of me that is better left in the shadows.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr. 23, 2006
    Posts
    410

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Seriously_Hunter View Post
    When I was a kid, my coach ALWAYS made sure my parents knew I'd fallen off (unfortunately, it happened ALOT )

    She also ensured to remind us to bring the brownies to the following lesson (the rule at the barn was anyone who fell off, had to bring brownies to share as they were now an official member of the groundhog club~ I became a brownie expert!!! )
    donuts here! Preferably Dunkin' Donuts, or possibly Detroit Donuts. We'll take Tim Hortons if theres no other option, but never, ever Krispy Kremes or anything from the gas station.

    oh, yeah, I always make sure I tell the parent myself. With possibly the exception of the one child who falls off almost every time she rides, but weighs about 15 pounds soaking wet, so she sort of floats gently to the ground instead of falling. They expect her to fall off.
    "I gave my life to become the person I am right now. Was it worth it?”



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan. 12, 2007
    Posts
    4,227

    Arrow

    Quote Originally Posted by potatochipjunkie View Post
    do you tell the parents when a student falls off or do you just have the child tell their mom/dad?
    Yes - it is part and parcel to riding and part and parcel to integrity.
    "If you don't know where you are going, any road will take you there"



  12. #12
    Join Date
    May. 27, 2008
    Location
    East Jesus No-Where
    Posts
    728

    Default

    Without a doubt ALWAYS tell the parents. From personal experience, I always make certain from the beginning my students' parents understand that falling is a possibility and prepare them for it more as the child begins more difficult aspects of riding. I am VERY CAUTIOS to never tell a child "I promise you won't fall off", instead if they ask the "But what if I fall?" question or any variation there of my answer is "Be sure you are riding properly, and paying attention and it will be less likely." I also try to make light of the fall to the child, while seperatly conveying to the parents the possibilty of an injury.

    I have known instructors to keep a fall from the parents and even tell the student not to say anything!

    In my experience, most parents are prepared to be told little Suzi fell off while learning to jump and are very encouraging and helpfull with the situation when instructors are open with them.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct. 6, 2008
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    22

    Default

    I'm not currently teaching, but I am a qualified coach. In the past, I have always told parents if the child has fallen off. Infact I would always brief the parents on the lesson, the good and the bad.

    Thankfully, i've not ever had a student have a really bad fall, but my insurance claims were always on standby if I felt that it was a fall that could get me into trouble. My falls were always the kind where the child has a small cry from the shock, then were straight back on. I did have 1 fall where the horse just went nuts (with a very small child onboard) and the child could've been seriously injured, but my sheer chance she wasn't. I knew the parents very well...if it had been anyone else, they may have tried to scam a claim.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep. 25, 2008
    Posts
    438

    Default

    Absolutely without a doubt tell the parents!



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar. 19, 2004
    Location
    Earlysville, VA
    Posts
    2,170

    Default

    You tell the parents.
    \"Tomorrow is a new day with no mistakes in it.\" Anne of Green Gables



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Aug. 17, 2004
    Location
    Rixeyville, VA
    Posts
    6,565

    Default

    We require the parents are present for the lessons for the younger kids. We do lots of leadline and very low level beginner work. The kids tend to be very young. With the older kids, we tell the parent if there is an accident of any kind if the parent is not present. Medical science is indicating that a concussion at a young age can have more serious consequences that a concussion at an older age (not that a concussion is ever a good thing!), so I don't want to second guess anything. We all wear helmets, but if a minor comes off, the parent is told.

    What I find more tricky is dealing with an adult coming off. Sometimes it is harder to convince a person who has been riding for a while to give a fall some consideration. I know because I am bad about that myself!



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Nov. 12, 2007
    Location
    MA
    Posts
    127

    Default Always

    Always tell the parents. It is the professional and responsible thing to do. Additionally, I always call the parent the next day to check to see how the child is feeling. That seems to be appreciated as well.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2007
    Posts
    513

    Default

    Nother experienced teacher here... Yes you tell the parents for all of the above reasons. So no need to restate them again But also having the story from the experienced eyes keeps the 'big fish story' effect from getting too crazy. You know, the on that goes like this... kid tells mom they were galloping up the field and jumping the BIG ones and none of the other kids got to do it and it was SO big and and and...

    When in reality, all the class was out for a walk round the field when pony stopped abruptly to snack by the log they were walking over and kiddo toppled off If that was what mom had to go by, I bet she'd be a little concerned!!



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Apr. 19, 2004
    Location
    Williamstown, MA USA
    Posts
    1,128

    Default

    I always tell the parents of a fall/bad experience. They also hear regular progress reports, what has been going well, and not so well, and what my plans are to improve any negatives for their child.
    Form follows function, or does function follow form?

    www.clearvisionequine.com

    http://clearvisionequine.blogspot.com



  20. #20
    Join Date
    May. 27, 2008
    Location
    East Jesus No-Where
    Posts
    728

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Traum View Post
    Nother experienced teacher here... Yes you tell the parents for all of the above reasons. So no need to restate them again But also having the story from the experienced eyes keeps the 'big fish story' effect from getting too crazy. You know, the on that goes like this... kid tells mom they were galloping up the field and jumping the BIG ones and none of the other kids got to do it and it was SO big and and and...

    When in reality, all the class was out for a walk round the field when pony stopped abruptly to snack by the log they were walking over and kiddo toppled off If that was what mom had to go by, I bet she'd be a little concerned!!

    Oh, it's funny cause it's true!!!



Similar Threads

  1. Clinicians/Instructors How Do You Do It?
    By GrayCatFarm in forum Off Course
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: Jun. 13, 2011, 09:52 PM
  2. Dressage Instructors in MD?
    By curlykarot in forum Dressage
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: Jun. 10, 2011, 03:12 PM
  3. outside instructors
    By skyy in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: Feb. 7, 2011, 02:20 PM
  4. What do you look for in instructors?
    By toesforward in forum Dressage
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: Jan. 10, 2011, 05:36 PM
  5. Instructors in MD
    By Kdash1228 in forum Eventing
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: Dec. 23, 2010, 05:24 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •