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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar. 19, 2004
    Location
    Earlysville, VA
    Posts
    2,186

    Default As I age . . .

    My parents have a whole collection of aging horses. While tromping around bringing in the beasties this morning, I got to thinking about how I am aging just like our critters and my pushing 50 body certainly doesn't work as well as it used to. I have to say that the most inconvenient change is my total lack of night vision now. At this time of year I end up having to bring horses in when it is dark to make sure I can get it all done and still get to work (or should I say the job that pays the bills , and I sure wish I could see as well as I used to. Fortunately my balance is still quite good!

    So how about the rest of you who have been at the horse stuff for quite a few years now--what changes do you find to be the most inconvenient--or even amusing--I found that hot flashes on horseback can be interesting!
    \"Tomorrow is a new day with no mistakes in it.\" Anne of Green Gables



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb. 16, 2006
    Posts
    718

    Default

    I used crushed limestone on my drive to the barn because as I walk with bad kneeitis I can't pick my foot up over the big #57 (LOL yes its the size of a grape) limestone. Pathetic, but I am tired of rolling on a rock and landing on my back. Even my hubby knows. He put a culvert in and bragged how he smoothed the gravel out and put the dust over it so grandma won't fall on her way to the barn! Yes I am 39 and have had two knee surgeries on the same knee and am trying to stay away from whole knee replacement. Yes, I do have my own walking stick/cane for when we go for walks through the woods or on uneven ground in the front yard! SAD
    The View from Here



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug. 20, 2008
    Location
    Marshall, VA
    Posts
    915

    Default

    While I am new to horsemanship as an adult, I find my lack of confidence extremely alarming. Confidence I knew I had in my youth and the feeling of being indestructable.

    My vision isn't what it used to be either, so picking Pete out of the herd at a distance is difficult, thankfully the barn has lights as the days shorten around here.

    Oh, and the realization that I don't know it all, like I thought I had in my youth is disheartening and amazing as well.
    Chronicle of My Horse
    Secret Passage Ranch
    **a member of the
    Riders with Fibromyalgia & Adult Re-riders Clique



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb. 8, 2004
    Location
    Rolling hills of Virginny
    Posts
    5,976

    Default

    The waning confidence issues bothered me a LOT at first.

    I was always the one who got thrown up on the hot, green, or just plain idiotic horses, because I had no fear. That's not the case anymore, and I don't know which is worse; losing that confidence, or never having had it.

    I'm coming to terms with my now-weeniness, but it was quite the blow to my ego when I realized I was no longer that young, confident rider.

    I ride a nice, quiet, sane Appaloosa gelding now, and I'm quite content to let all the younger, more confident riders pass me by, laughing. I remember when I was them, and know that someday they'll be where I am now.

    Yep, the hot flashes on horseback are truly interesting, aren't they!

    I never had much night vision anyway, so not having it now doesn't really bother me.

    The creaking, cracking and general Rice Crispies noises, plus the slower pace at which I get out of bed and warmed up can be disheartening, too. But at least I'm still out there riding!
    The plural of anecdote is not data.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug. 20, 2008
    Location
    Marshall, VA
    Posts
    915

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by arabhorse2 View Post
    The waning confidence issues bothered me a LOT at first.

    I was always the one who got thrown up on the hot, green, or just plain idiotic horses, because I had no fear. That's not the case anymore, and I don't know which is worse; losing that confidence, or never having had it.

    I'm coming to terms with my now-weeniness, but it was quite the blow to my ego when I realized I was no longer that young, confident rider.

    I ride a nice, quiet, sane Appaloosa gelding now, and I'm quite content to let all the younger, more confident riders pass me by, laughing. I remember when I was them, and know that someday they'll be where I am now.

    Yep, the hot flashes on horseback are truly interesting, aren't they!

    I never had much night vision anyway, so not having it now doesn't really bother me.

    The creaking, cracking and general Rice Crispies noises, plus the slower pace at which I get out of bed and warmed up can be disheartening, too. But at least I'm still out there riding!
    *Standing Ovation* BRAVO arabhorse2!! Very eloquently put!!!
    Chronicle of My Horse
    Secret Passage Ranch
    **a member of the
    Riders with Fibromyalgia & Adult Re-riders Clique



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2002
    Location
    PA, where the State motto is: "If it makes sense, we don't do it!".
    Posts
    11,358

    Default

    I've been thinking about this aging thing too, since I'm pushing 60....

    I've noticed for the past couple of months I just can't move as fast as I used to--nor do I want to.... I figure I'll get to the end soon enough, I'm just going to take my time and do things to my satisfaction.... I don't know though if it's age, or the fact I know my time with my horse is limited (as she may have to be euthanized any day), or what--but I'm trying to enjoy it....

    My balance isn't too hot anymore. Thankfully my butt is well padded and so far I haven't fallen into anything that hasn't been able to break my fall without damaging me....

    I can see why people weren't designed to live forever now. I've just about had it with our government and the people with whom I am in direct contact--mainly my BO.... I guess that person was right when he/she said, "Familiarity breeds contempt!"....

    When my horse is gone I'm going to try and work with a local rescue who takes in Thoroughbreds from New Holland and off the tracks..... I'd like to repay my little TB whom I bought to save from New Holland and who ended up saving me!!!! There are so many of them out there who need help, desperately....
    "Happiness equals reality minus expectations." ~Tom Magliozzi~ of the infamous duo, Click and Clack Tappet, Car Talk hosts. RIP, Tom 6/28/37-11/3/14



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar. 26, 2005
    Location
    Back to Normal.. or as close as I'll ever get
    Posts
    9,712

    Default

    Maybe it's because I had to wait so long (39) to buy my own horse and then to get my own farm (53), but I am enjoying the aging process.

    I find I have infinitely more patience with my horses than I had as - to quote Joe Pesci in My cousin Vinny: a "yout".
    And I am ever so grateful Vern put up with me in said youth so I can repay him now with a life of ease.

    Yes, I creak in a whole lot of places, mounting from the ground is a thing of the past and things in general may take longer & seem harder/heavier than they once were...
    But all in all, it's All Good
    *friend of bar.ka*RIP all my lovely boys, gone too soon:
    Steppin' Out 1988-2004
    Hey Vern! 1982-2009
    Cash's Bay Threat 1994-2009



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb. 8, 2004
    Location
    Rolling hills of Virginny
    Posts
    5,976

    Default

    2Dogs and VAHorse, the only sin is not trying. As long as we're out there doing our best it's all good, as 2Dogs said.

    At 50 y/o, I don't have the patience with stoopid, ignernt people that I used to, but I do have a whole lot more with the animals.
    The plural of anecdote is not data.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug. 12, 2001
    Location
    Trailer Trash Ammy!
    Posts
    19,520

    Default

    The thing I'm having the most trouble with is the dang arthritis. I finally got around to getting an actual PPD rating and it's a lot worse than I thought... as in "I wonder if I could qualify for the Paralympics with this?" bad... I have *more* fear than I once did but I like to think it's keeping me sensible rather than stopping me entirely. It sure isn't keeping me off the greenies, but I confess that when I ride anything nowadays other than HRH Avery, who I *know* will stand no matter *what* I do, I have to have help mounting and dismounting. That's the only part that is really scary for me. I require some extra "hang time" getting on and off and I feel the need to ensure the greenies aren't going anywhere while I do it.
    "The standard you walk by is the standard you accept."--Lt. Gen. David Morrison, Austalian Army Chief



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan. 2, 2008
    Location
    Montgomery County, MD
    Posts
    496

    Default

    In some ways things are better for me now, because when I was young I was sick and felt terrible all the time. So deteriorating now that I'm middle-aged doesn't feel bad at all by comparison, as my basic health is better.

    For instance, while other people have their night vision go away as they age, mine has always been awful so I don't notice anything getting worse. As for waning confidence: I think this is a good thing! I was an idiot when I was young, jumping over all sorts of insane obstacles without realizing that I could die. Until one day I nearly did die. It's great to learn a serious lesson about your own mortality when you're only 19; it gives you a different perspective. (Hurts like a bastard, though. )

    I'm more patient now. Much less likely to get upset with a horse. Much more likely to see where things might go wrong and anticipate an accident waiting to happen. I'm nowhere near as good a rider technically as I was when I was 24, but I'm a better horsewoman.

    The only thing I really have a problem with is that I lose condition so easily. Used to be I could get in shape and then a week off wouldn't really affect things. Now, just two or three days out of the saddle and I can feel a difference.

    I also don't enjoy having to use reading glasses to do detail work, and shove them up on my head when I'm on the ground or find a place to stick them where they won't flop or hurt or break when I'm riding. Hate the glasses, but I'm insecure without them--whenever I leave them hanging on a hook before I go ride, sure enough I'll have to look at something closely in the course of the ride.

    Those are the only 2 problems, though.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct. 18, 2000
    Posts
    22,455

    Default

    Having to write myself notes so I don't forget things.

    Realizing that getting out of bed in the morning is a process. There is no "jumping" out of bed in the morning unless a dog has been skunked and leaps onto the bed to share the experience with me.

    Mounting from the ground? Not these days. Which makes falling off in a field very annoying.

    Had some farm and horse injuries to my hands over the years - my piano playing days are over. I'd taken up the guitar but alas - there's just not enough dexterity.

    But - they're strong enough to grip reins - that's all that matters.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    May. 8, 2004
    Posts
    4,320

    Default

    Skeezix, I am 50 and I have been mucking stalls, hauling water and hay bales for 38 years. I am still pretty strong but I hate not being able to see well at night! I am also more wary of falling on the ice, even though I usually have 3 or 4 pretty good wipeouts every winter, carrying water out to the field or slogging through the snow. The good thing is, I'm old enough so I don't worry about people seeing me in my nightgown going out to feed...they'll just think I'm that old crazy horse lady.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb. 11, 2005
    Location
    Wild Wild West
    Posts
    1,734

    Default

    I can't mount from the ground, especially since I ride a taller horse. (Not gi-normous, but taller than average.) The other day I was out riding in my field and spotted the horse-eating llamas. I confuse, I debated what would be worse -- sitting on my horse and dealing with what happened when he saw the llamas, or dismounting and not being able to remount later and having to walk all the way home....Sad.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    43,045

    Default

    I didn't even noticed I was getting older until I had a heart attack four years ago, due to an undiagnosed birth heart defect.
    After that, it seems that I had one thing after the other come up, from a broken arm/wrist, to other annoying little problems.
    Being routinely on the injured reserve list is becoming a habit, not a good one.

    What those of you can try is to go to work out, on machines, to keep strenght up, on flexibility, etc. so you can ride better.
    I can still ride, because I have not mentioned that to the Dr's, so they have not said I can't.

    On courage, I think that as we get older we don't become cowards, but maybe aquire more common sense to know what we can and should do and when we better abstain.

    Oh and yes, riding little horses helps.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Apr. 7, 2005
    Location
    summerville GA
    Posts
    3,219

    Default

    Well aging hasnt stopped me from much with the horses, it has helped. I am much more mellow now and go around calmly and quietly and they follow suit. I can still fling bales of alfalfa but will admit to dreading it now where as a few years ago, it was heavenly. I loved the workout. Now, I dread the pain LOL

    But, having to buy magnifying glasses to read anything anymore is very annoying. In just a few short months, I am realizing that I will have to start carrying them in my pocket which means a ton of money in glasses. I got lost the other day on a drive and pulled out the map. Talk about frustrated when I realized that I was never going to be able to read it no matter how long I gave my eyes to adjust to the failing light.
    I cant read the cereal boxes or list of ingredients on the feed. Eyes, yes, the eyes I shall miss.
    Our horses are not seen as the old and disabled they may have become, but rather as the mighty steeds they once believed themselves to be.

    Sunkissed Acres Rescue and Retirement



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jul. 14, 2000
    Location
    midwest
    Posts
    10,628

    Default

    I'm w/ the OP, night driving is the worst!

    Otherwise, I'm always inspired, like today when I foxhunted beside a 78 year old member- who is starting her 61 first year with the hunt club. Her regular hilltopping staff co-leader, also 78, was gone today so she asked me to ride beside her and assist with duties. I tip my helmet to her.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jan. 24, 2008
    Posts
    1,570

    Default

    At 53, it just takes me longer to do routine barn chores. I can still lift feed bags, muck buckets and hay bales, I just have to go slower. It's frustrating, but now I just allow more time to get things done.

    I also find myself more careful about what horse I ride. I'm small, so I rode cheeky ponies and started colts since my teens. Those days are gone. I try to stay as safe as I can-that's why I feel it's so important to work with a good instructor. She makes sure my skills stay sharp and my horse is happy.

    I still ride alone, even though it isn't smart-anyone else?



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Feb. 19, 2007
    Posts
    238

    Default

    Now that I have passed 40 I have learned that Ibuprofen is my friend.
    Per Equus Ad Astra
    (through horses to the stars)



  19. #19

    Default

    Well, my life is totally upside down. I am healthier, happier, stronger and much more courageous now than I was when I was a young wimpy ignorant push-over!

    Having said that, I do make a few concessions to age. I don't recover as quickly as I used to. I get tired early ... even though I am on CoTH right now at 1 a.m., I'm USUALLY asleep by 9 or 9:30 (I have pre-race jitters and just can't sleep ...). And the reading glasses, I really hate the reading glasses!

    But I do work hard at staying fit. I can work longer, carry more, ride better, well ... do just about anything better (except read or sleep) ... now than when I was younger. That is not a testament to aging well as much as to being young very poorly. ha ha. What's that they say? Youth is wasted on the young!

    Oh, the other thing I hate? What's up with the memory loss thing? How did THAT happen? I can't remember squat! Sometimes I can't even remember TO squat!



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Mar. 19, 2004
    Location
    Earlysville, VA
    Posts
    2,186

    Default

    Between my sqeaking knees and clicking hips . . . or is it clicking knees and speaking hips, the old mares and I could be a percussion section. Wouldn't we be grand?
    \"Tomorrow is a new day with no mistakes in it.\" Anne of Green Gables



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