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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar. 9, 2008
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    300

    Default I saw something very disturbing!

    I live in Ohio and am only 15 minutes from a horse slaughter auction in Sugarcreek Ohio. I know they have to go out of the us for slaughter now but there are still killers who transport them out of the US at this auction. Well I went to the back where all the horses were kept and there were three foals in a pen together. They were nothing but skin and bones, they had the long hair that horses get when they are starved, one on had a broken hip or something he couldn't even walk and both front legs were so deformed. It broke my heart that someone would take the time to transport those little guys to the auction house and put them through the stress of all of that instead of just having them put down! Another point....people should not breed if they can not handle the responsibilities and knowledge that it takes to raise horses!!! Sorry for the rant but I was sick all weekend about all the poor babies at that auction.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug. 26, 2003
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    The good 'ole State of denial
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    I don't think anyone here will argue with you on that. Amen.

    The problem is not everyone cares, and the ones that don't care are likely not going to be trying to learn about SHB on internet BBs. These people think of horses as commodities that rank below their 4-wheeler and beer. Horses aren't pets to them, they probably aren't even as valuable as a cow to them b/c a cow produces an immediate demand for milk and/or meat. They breed hundreds upon hundreds of grade foals and ship them in large quantities to auctions for $200-$500 a pop. Do the math...if probably cost them nothing to breed them, they are raised "free," pasture bred, foal out in the wilderness, no foot/vet/worming care, skinny and potbellied and living off free range. Until people stop buying them and auctions quit allowing them...these folks, unfortunately, won't stop. What are they going to do, sell all the horses and the ranch and get a real job (okggo l'sol) that would be too much like work!

    So so sad



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun. 4, 2002
    Location
    Suffolk, VA
    Posts
    16,684

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by okggo View Post
    I don't think anyone here will argue with you on that. Amen.

    The problem is not everyone cares, and the ones that don't care are likely not going to be trying to learn about SHB on internet BBs. These people think of horses as commodities that rank below their 4-wheeler and beer. Horses aren't pets to them, they probably aren't even as valuable as a cow to them b/c a cow produces an immediate demand for milk and/or meat. They breed hundreds upon hundreds of grade foals and ship them in large quantities to auctions for $200-$500 a pop. Do the math...if probably cost them nothing to breed them, they are raised "free," pasture bred, foal out in the wilderness, no foot/vet/worming care, skinny and potbellied and living off free range. Until people stop buying them and auctions quit allowing them...these folks, unfortunately, won't stop. What are they going to do, sell all the horses and the ranch and get a real job (okggo l'sol) that would be too much like work!

    So so sad
    Well said Julie. I also believe as long as the killer market provides a reward for people who breed indiscriminately like that and treat horses like that, there will be people who "supply" them. I know of ranches that breed everything with a uterus regardless of quality and bring the killer trucks right to the ranch in the fall and load up the unsold babies. They might make a pittance on them but since they put nothing in them to begin with, it is profitable to them.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb. 2, 2003
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    Wynnewood, Oklahoma
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    Quote Originally Posted by okggo View Post
    They breed hundreds upon hundreds of grade foals and ship them in large quantities to auctions for $200-$500 a pop.
    Our local horse auction (probably similar to the one the OP attended) weanling and yearlings sell for $50.00...$100 if they look really, really good. Abandonment of starving horses is becoming more and more of an issue. Horse rescues are full with no more room at the inn.

    In our travels, we're now seeing signs in certain parts of the country saying that anyone found abandoning horses will be prosecuted. Trick is catching them. But, flip side is what does someone do that can no longer afford to care for their horses? No horse rescues to take them. Can't sell them. We've always humanely euthanized our aged and injured horses, but if you're poor, even that can be out of the budget and shooting a horse, many owners just can't bring themselves to do. I KNOW that if you're poor you shouldn't own a horse, but we're talking reality not what people "should" do. We hear regularly about those people that are going to breed their Clydesdale mare to an Arabian and the foal will have a "forever" home. We try to encourage people that before breeding, think of what will happen if you can't provide that "forever" home. At least breed something that will stand the chance of being marketable and the opportunity that someone will purchase it.

    Things are going to get worse before they get better.

    Kathy St.Martin
    Equine Reproduction Short Courses
    http://www.equine-reproduction.com



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug. 26, 2003
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    The good 'ole State of denial
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daydream Believer View Post
    Well said Julie. I also believe as long as the killer market provides a reward for people who breed indiscriminately like that and treat horses like that, there will be people who "supply" them. I know of ranches that breed everything with a uterus regardless of quality and bring the killer trucks right to the ranch in the fall and load up the unsold babies. They might make a pittance on them but since they put nothing in them to begin with, it is profitable to them.
    Yup...Do you remember the youtube video in Holland? of a bunch of friesians flooded on an island and the rescue effort to get them off? Beautiful horses, great condition, good weight. It came out later that they all belonged to a meat farm, they were raised to slaughter. However, what I have noticed, in the countries that eat horse meat, they tend to care for their stock better, in good flesh and not pumped with god-knows what kinds of medications, it is controlled. Like many of the good cattle breeders in the US, the cattle are fed well, cared for well, and do ultimately end up as dinners. There are strict requirements for food in the US, but the horse slaughter seems to have none (correct me if I'm wrong here).

    In the US the breeders like we are talking about really have no minimum requirements to meet. Pretty much anything is fair game for the meat man.

    I'm not really sure where I'm going with this, other than at least if there were standards for slaughter bound purchases maybe they would arrive in better shape. Although I agree with you, in an ideal world we wouldn't need or be able to keep a killer market in business. But I think regulating the purchases is probably a more attainable step then abolishing them at this point.

    And I'm also throwing out there I haven't studied the slaughter industry at all so my post is strictly an opinion, and it may be uninformed but so far it is what I have seen. But I have been to auctions (New Holland) and see what goes through there and what goes to KBs. It is a really really frightening thought that some of those animals may be intended for food, and that they are purchased as-is (many times in the worst end of the spectrum).

    Kathy, that is just sad!! But really, that is also VERY VERY VERY irresponsible of them. If it is happening with that great of frequency, it seems unlikely that they are all cases of unfortunate events (i.e. spouce dies, house falls down). Plenty of them SHOULD HAVE KNOWN better, and ignorance is no excuse. If they are too poor to afford putting the horse down, but yet bought or bred horses anyway, then I have absolutely no sorrow for them and their poor decision making.



  6. #6
    phattchik Guest

    Default

    Ending horse slaughter in the US has only made things much worse for the horses. At least when the "foal mill" breeders had an outlet for their "produce" they made an effort to get them to the sales in good condition. Now they are, in many cases, left to fend for themselves. Not good.

    Personally I don't like the idea of horse slaughter but after all millions of cattle are slaughtered each year and I honestly don't think it is "wrong" to slaughter horses for food. What is wrong is shipping them inhumanely to Mexico and Canada for slaughter. What is wrong is abandoned horses, starving. Winter is just around the corner and I'm guessing there are many horses "on the range" that won't make it through the winter. But, since they are "free" that might be OK with many folks .

    If HSUS and PETA get their way, ending slaughter is just the beginning. The ultimate goal is that no one have an animal for ANY purpose. No riding, no guide dogs, no meat, no milk, not even a soft purring kitty on your lap on a cold morning.



  7. #7
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    Feb. 2, 2003
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    Wynnewood, Oklahoma
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    Quote Originally Posted by okggo View Post
    Kathy, that is just sad!! But really, that is also VERY VERY VERY irresponsible of them. If it is happening with that great of frequency, it seems unlikely that they are all cases of unfortunate events (i.e. spouce dies, house falls down). Plenty of them SHOULD HAVE KNOWN better, and ignorance is no excuse. If they are too poor to afford putting the horse down, but yet bought or bred horses anyway, then I have absolutely no sorrow for them and their poor decision making.
    Oh, you get no argument from me. Frustrating. Really frustrating. It's all about education but some of those that say "it will have a forever home" just don't understand that some things just aren't forever.

    Kathy St.Martin
    Equine Reproduction Short Courses
    http://www.equine-reproduction.com



  8. #8

    Default

    I'm glad to see I'm not the only one that thinks ending horse slaughter will, in the end be even more horrible for horses. okggo you made some really valid points, and I have to say I pretty much agree with you-much to the distaste of many people I know. I think regulating things so there is a certain standard of care would be so much better for these poor things that are now suffering a fate much worse than death. And I'm one of the biggest softies around....again just an opinion though. The whole thing is sad no matter how you slice it



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar. 9, 2008
    Posts
    300

    Default

    I am not against horse slaughter.....but I dont agree with how they are treated in the auctions and on the way to the slaughter house. Without slaughter houses, Horses will be standing in fields SLOWLY starving to death. Which is worse?? I guess there is no real answer to this than proper education and consequences for those who abuse and neglect animals.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov. 29, 2005
    Posts
    2,625

    Default

    Horses have and will continue to be found starving to death in fields and barns. It made no difference when half a million were slaughtered in the US or today when only 100K are shipped out of country to be slaughtered.

    Point is who do you want to see rewarded for this behavior? The asshat indiscriminate breeders and kill buyers?

    It sucks for the horses either way but I'd rather not support above mentioned persons- thank you.

    Our equine industry needs to start making OWNERS and RANCHES responsible for their actions- not debating the effects post mortum if you will. Call them out... SHAME them with public pressure... stopping their money making business.

    Make a statement by hitting them in their pocketbook.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct. 26, 2007
    Posts
    29

    Default

    Over the last year we have seen the horses decrease more and more that are going to the auctions to such a point that we aren't going at all any more. We have no more room at the inn for that rescue that we take care of(We have purchase more than one or two). The slaughters being gone have just made it bad for the horses. We are in Houston and the horses are being treated worse than when it was legal to slaughter, it is disturbing and sad.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug. 26, 2008
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    1,779

    Default

    Message from Canadian Slaughterhouses: "We don't need your horses, really"

    There are farms up here that breed specifically for slaughter. At least two that I know of, probably more. Mostly big draft crosses. By the hundreds.

    We are now importing so many horses from the US that is is beginning to affect the price of horses in Canada, and increase the number of abandonments.

    The border is now closed to horses from Florida, and will likely be closed at some point due to pressure from animal rights groups. There will truly be no out.
    Lifestyle coordinator for Zora, Spooky, Wolfgang and Warrior



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