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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Feb. 23, 2007
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    Initech, Storage B.
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    715

    Default What is Philly Park's policy?

    So far, I have heard that Suffolk Downs has implemented a zero tolerance policy for trainers sending horses to slaughter. I wasn't aware of any other tracks taking such a position (sadly) yet, but wondered if your statement below means that Philly Park has such a policy as well?

    "the head of the PTHA called in the shipper/trainer and spoke to him, told him to reimburse Christy for the horses, which he did, and warned him that if he (or any other trainer) were ever found to take horses to livestock auctions, they would have their stalls revoked."

    Anyone?



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Dec. 29, 2003
    Location
    Long Branch, NJ 07740
    Posts
    794

    Default

    We implemented our zero tolerance policy that same day.
    Turning For Home, Inc.
    Philadelphia Park Racehorse Retirement Program
    www.patha.org
    turningforhome@patha.org



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Feb. 23, 2007
    Location
    Initech, Storage B.
    Posts
    715

    Default That's great news!

    Thank you for clarifying, Barbara. That is fantastic news, but not widely known (or I am just very behind). Was there ever a press release?--word needs to get out and tracks need to be thanked for taking a stand IMO.



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jun. 12, 2007
    Location
    East Coast
    Posts
    24

    Default

    Interesting.

    You mentioned the budget for the Philly Park program. What percentage goes to operation expenses vs. salary?

    Also- could not find Turning For Home listed as a valid 501c3 in Charity Navigator or the IRS website.
    http://www.irs.gov/charities/article...=96136,00.html Why?
    Last edited by TBdoITfaster; Sep. 28, 2008 at 06:38 PM.



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jun. 12, 2007
    Location
    East Coast
    Posts
    24



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Oct. 6, 2005
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    1,705

    Default

    I don't see the "different wording." That's exactly what Barbara just wrote. Those could be the same horses we're discussing. She said "We implemented our zero tolerance policy that same day."



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Aug. 24, 2008
    Posts
    160

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TBdoITfaster View Post
    Interesting.

    You mentioned the budget for the Philly Park program. What percentage goes to operation expenses vs. salary?

    Also- could not find Turning For Home listed as a valid 501c3 in Charity Navigator or the IRS website.
    http://www.irs.gov/charities/article...=96136,00.html Why?
    SALARY??? I understand that some orgs. do have people on payroll but for any start up org. one would *think* that any salary would be backburner at least until operations get up and running succesfully.



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Oct. 14, 2000
    Location
    Now In the Sandhills, NC mostly
    Posts
    6,752

    Default

    Xrays arent owned by the track, they are owned by the person who hired the vet to get them. Sometimes those xrays aren't available, oftentimes the "owners" aren't willing to hand them over--it has nothing to do with whatever program gets the horses, unless they themselves took xrays.



  9. #29
    Join Date
    Sep. 27, 2008
    Location
    Saratoga, NY
    Posts
    43

    Default

    SALARY??? I ditto Mojo's surprise to that... How much of the budget does go to that???

    I am not trying to be a ball buster at all, because I think the concept is a good one, but I guess the questions I have is that many of the horses have such debilitating injuries that they are just good as pastures pets at best... what happens if they cannot be adopted out? Do these places keep them and if so, once they exhaust the initial stipend do they get any more money to help with the care of the horse?



  10. #30
    Join Date
    Oct. 26, 2003
    Posts
    1,897

    Default

    Why is everyone "shocked" that such an operation would include a salary? I think Barbara is the only employee involved in the program, but do any of you work full-time for free, unless you are independently wealthy? Generally, programs that have some salaried employees are more successful than those who rely only on volunteers, because with an all-volunteer program you are basically depending on the goodwill of those volunteers. If they don't feel like doing something, they don't do it. There's no accountability.

    I have been to the Next Dance TB rescue and the horses are very well-cared for. They are also holding horse shows at the farm to raise funds for the program. Why is there so much criticism in horse rescue? Every well-run rescue has a policy about which horses they will or will not accept. Rerun, for example, where Barbara was the executive director, only takes horses off the track. Many people over the years wanted to have them accept a former racehorse who has been off the track for a while - they can't do it. It's not their policy. Standardbred Retirement Foundation only take STBS - but there are people who are ticked off at them for not accepting a horse of another breed!
    Give Philly Park some credit for doing this - they're way ahead of most other tracks.



  11. #31
    Join Date
    Jun. 22, 2001
    Location
    Coatesville, Pa.
    Posts
    5,461

    Default

    I hesitate to post this, but for the good of him I will.

    My boss and by default I guess I too had Toy Thief in my string when we were based at Delaware and Belmont a couple years back.

    I was worried about him then as we claimed him from a known trainer who would maybe not have the soundest horses, but he did have a good vet.

    He had soundness issues on and off and I believe was claimed from or sold from my boss, or his owner after I had switched jobs and moved onto a different trainer.

    I wish I could tell you that this never happens, but after 3-4 years on the backside I found it does happen. More and more.

    As we speak right now there is an old horse from my string on the CANTER listings. Yet when the trainer miraculously called me to tell me he was done due to being "off at the trot, but he gallops fine" (I have bugged him at the end of each year's meet and expressed my desire to be informed if he was ever done)
    I was saddened to hear that his ankles are now 90% fused. Thus ruling out a useful role for me or friends I have mentioned him to as a potential sport horse. So I spent 3 days contacting people who knew him to see about giving him a great retirement asap. I spoke to the farm who stands his sire, I called his breeders, my old boss, his former owner, the TRF etc etc. When I started to get a line on the possibilities I called his current owner/trainer back to give him an update and when I mentioned 'retirement' it all fell to pieces. The trainer won't allow him to go to retirement. He thought I wanted him for a sport horse...I tried to explain there were options outside of the Trf he was even less inclined to listen.

    I explained that I was initially interested in him myself, but the ankles precluded that course now. I mentioned retirement farms and he immediately launched into a diatribe saying how he wouldn't "..send a pig to any of the TRF farms." He has "plenty" of people who will take him. That was 10 days ago. 2 days ago the horse who was lame enough at a trot that the trainer said he was done, has been entered for another race at the track tomorrow. And there's nothing I can do.

    This is the reality kids. The horses make money, and they are pushed until they are useless. Or less useful anyway. I saw it firsthand, and though I know there are exceptions...but right now I am very distraught.


    I hope Toy Thief is ok, I know his legs weren't great 2 years ago. I hope someone can donate and get him to be sound enough to be a pasture puff.

    ~Emily
    "Courage is not the absence of fear but rather the judgment that something is more important than fear. The brave may not live forever but the cautious do not live at all." ~2001 The Princess Diaries



  12. #32
    Join Date
    Sep. 27, 2008
    Location
    Saratoga, NY
    Posts
    43

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by lolalola View Post
    Why is everyone "shocked" that such an operation would include a salary? I think Barbara is the only employee involved in the program, but do any of you work full-time for free, unless you are independently wealthy? Generally, programs that have some salaried employees are more successful than those who rely only on volunteers, because with an all-volunteer program you are basically depending on the goodwill of those volunteers. If they don't feel like doing something, they don't do it. There's no accountability.

    I have been to the Next Dance TB rescue and the horses are very well-cared for. They are also holding horse shows at the farm to raise funds for the program. Why is there so much criticism in horse rescue? Every well-run rescue has a policy about which horses they will or will not accept. Rerun, for example, where Barbara was the executive director, only takes horses off the track. Many people over the years wanted to have them accept a former racehorse who has been off the track for a while - they can't do it. It's not their policy. Standardbred Retirement Foundation only take STBS - but there are people who are ticked off at them for not accepting a horse of another breed!
    Give Philly Park some credit for doing this - they're way ahead of most other tracks.
    I do give Philly some credit for setting up this program, but there are a lot of variables that are still unanswered! That's all...

    I wish I was independently wealthy in that I could work for free, but to be honest, from what sources have told me- this salary Turning for home is not Paying her some minimum wage job!

    I guess another question I have- is what happens when a farm gets full??? What happens to the horses that cannot be adopted? Does all funding stop for the farm after the initial stipend is exhausted?

    I mean each owner is having $10 deducted from their purse everytime they run a horse! So, say that-Hypothetically- there are 9 races a day with small fields- say 7 horses! 9x7=63 x $10=$630 Say they race 216 days a year, so that comes to $136,080!

    Now who gets that money? I mean these questions are going to be asked and need to be answered! I know as an owner myself, I do not mind contributing $10 per start towards the program- I think it is a good idea, but would also like to see some sort of budget sheet- which I am hoping we will all see come year end!!

    JMHO!!
    Last edited by Nyminute09; Oct. 5, 2008 at 08:17 PM.



  13. #33
    Join Date
    Jan. 31, 2003
    Posts
    18,472

    Default

    I wouldn't get my panties too in a wad about that; if they have 60 horses in their care that gives each horse about $250/year budget. It costs me that much EACH MONTH to keep two OTTB's in rehab. It's not really a lot of money when it comes to horse care, trust me
    "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
    ---
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.



  14. #34
    Join Date
    May. 28, 2006
    Location
    Central Mississippi
    Posts
    2,271

    Default

    Why are so many of you harping at Turning for Home? Seems like a young but growing program serving a vital need. How about some support for something we all know is needed?



  15. #35
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2006
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    129

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Barbara L. View Post
    SO:
    1) Criteria for program: trainers or owners who are based at Philadelphia Park for at least 6 months out of the year, and who want to find homes/safe haven for their retired or injured horses need only come to my office, on track, turn in the JC papers, supply me with xrays, digitals, ultrasounds or vet records, fill out one info sheet on a horse(s) that are based at the track. Intact males must be castrated. We do not turn any horse down due to lameness issues. It is a voluntary program, we do not make the trainers come to us, though in ruling that no trainer can send a horse to a livestock auction, we have become a very big outlet for many of them.

    I'm sure you all have many more questions, and hopefully, I have answered the bulk of them. I will try to get on the stick with updating our website so that no one has to waste his or her time posting on a forum that I may not even get to read more than once week.

    Does this clear things up a little?
    Barbara, I hate to be a fly in the ointment but when I contacted you this summer about a horse at Philly that needed a place to go you specifically told me that TFH would not take the horse unless the trainer himself came in and filled out the application. Now in the first paragraph above you state that the trainer doesn't have to do so? If you remember correctly, I also offered to pay the $250 admission fee that was required at the time (and discontinued a couple of days later.) Maybe I'm not fully comprehending what you're trying to say. It's been a long day. But in my estimation, this was a case of a horse that needed a place to go, had been stabled at Philadelphia Park for over, raced at Philly exclusively and had someone willing to pay the donation to get the horse into the program. So because the person willing to do so was not the trainer or owner who was physically at the track, but a rescue person you've known for a couple of years, you turned the horse down? How did this help the horse? Just curious. And are you the sole decision maker as to when the horses are accepted and which one of the participating farms they are sent to? What happens once the stipends that go along with the horses run out?

    Oh, and you and I both know that Suffolk's zero tolerance policy was started prior to Philly's.

    Diana



  16. #36
    Join Date
    Jan. 7, 2001
    Location
    Usually too far from the barn
    Posts
    8,704

    Default

    Xctrygirl, you have learned why (sadly) alot of 'cloak and dagger" behind the scenes stuff happens in the process of getting horses off the track.
    No one can be straight about what they are doing. People have to put up ransom money to claim horses that shouldn't be running. Horses like this one are too sore to use as riding horses but are racing because the trainer wont "retire" him.
    F O.B
    Resident racing historian ~~~ Re-riders Clique
    Founder of the Mighty Thoroughbred Clique



  17. #37
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2006
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    129

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MySparrow View Post
    Why are so many of you harping at Turning for Home? Seems like a young but growing program serving a vital need. How about some support for something we all know is needed?

    Just looking for some honesty. All of the retirement programs are vital whether they're for Thoroughbreds or any other breed and they deserve our support. But when they are run in a way that doesn't serve the horses well, it hurts everyone. All new programs have growing pains, some more than others. But there seem to be some real red flags here. The site has been up for 5 months, long enough to have all of this info up and running. Protecting these horses is too important not to do it carefully.



  18. #38
    Join Date
    Sep. 30, 2008
    Location
    Allentown, NJ
    Posts
    41

    Default

    I have never posted before, but feel the need to address some issues here!
    This Turning for Home program is a great concept, but seems like it was thrown into action a bit prematurely as there seem to be a lot of holes in it!

    First off, to the individual who stated that not everybody runs to the internet for information- I have to inform you that almost 72% of Americans use the internet for one thing or another. I know in my experience with buying and selling horses almost 95% of the horses I have sold have been done so off of internet ads- not by word of mouth!

    So my question is this- the website, as Barbara said, is a work in progress, but it really needs to be more detailed as you can reach a lot more people and potential adopters with it! Also, it really should include a list of all the farms these horses go to with links to each farm, so anyone interested can contact them directly- rather than contact her directly! That would free up more of her time and it will reach a larger population of people!

    Secondly, to the individual who stated that they have been to Reindancer and the horses were well taken care of [edit], I accompanied a friend's daughter to a lesson there once and was very upset when I walked into the back barn that housed the thoroughbreds [edit]. While the facility is gorgeous and the stalls were clean, the horses do not look well! I went on the PATHA website and looked at some before pictures and many of them had lost tons of weight! Their top lines were gone and many were very sunken inand very ribby! I have dealt with thoroughbreds before and they are a different type of breed! They are not in the category of easy keeper! Now the people, who run the farm, were very nice to me but do not seem to be very knowledgeable in the care of thoroughbreds, especially ones right off the track!

    I guess another question I have is what is the prerequisite for an approved farm? Also, besides Barbara, is there a committee who goes out and checks up on these horses since the track and horseman are funding their care?

    People are not trying to be vicious here- just very curious as to what the procedures are and also making sure that everything that is being done is in the best interest of the horses! That's all!
    Last edited by Moderator 1; Oct. 6, 2008 at 08:12 AM. Reason: allegations



  19. #39
    Join Date
    May. 4, 2006
    Location
    Seabeck - the soggy peninsula
    Posts
    3,174

    Default

    I don't mean to join into a mob attack on Turning For Home but I am very curious as how one thinks they are protecting a horse when their identities (their papers) are taken from them, they are eliminated from the JC database and the horse is no more. I find that puts them in a much greater risk in the future, since one has to think of that. Keeping the papers with them, and developing a different policy with the JC whereby the horses could be excluded from racing with a different procedure would be far better. There goes their breeders names, their sire and dams names, and the possibility of ever contacting them again if by chance they may want to help one of their own.
    This is just shortsighted thinking imho.
    "I have brought on the hatred of Wall Street and I relish it".
    Franklin Delano Roosevelt



  20. #40
    Join Date
    Aug. 31, 2008
    Posts
    47

    Default

    Barbara - I just want to know and need to know as I haven't gotten an answer. Are you going to prosecute this case? Thank you.



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