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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug. 3, 2004
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    Vermont
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    Default Gray test available

    I heard the gray test will be available on their website today!

    http://animalgenetics.us/Equine.htm



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec. 21, 2005
    Location
    New Zealand
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    517

    Default

    That's so great that this test is finally available. Breeders and buyers can now test foals and don't have to wait 3+ years to identify those late graying individuals. If this test becomes widely used it will be interesting to see if the theory of foals being born their adult colour=gray foal holds up. (Also useful for any double dilutes and paints out there that might be hiding gray underneath).



  3. #3
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    Jan. 3, 2007
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    Poulsbo, WA
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    yea!!

    Just in time, too... we still don't know for sure on our dark palomino filly, and we need to decide how to register her by mid september!

    Wonder why it is so expensive compared to their other tests?
    Blacktree Farm
    Lessons, training & sporthorse sales. Proud supporter of our buckskin German Warmblood stallion, Yeager GF.
    Blacktree Studio
    Graphic Design, Web Design & Photography.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb. 4, 2006
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    2,954

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by WarmbloodColor View Post
    yea!!

    Just in time, too... we still don't know for sure on our dark palomino filly, and we need to decide how to register her by mid september!

    Wonder why it is so expensive compared to their other tests?
    I'd guess less demand. The vast, vast majority of greys you can figure out are going grey when they are only a month or two old (some even when they are newborns), and for breeding purposes, you don't really need to test - by the time a horse is breedable, either they've greyed out or they haven't. That leaves a small pool of cremellos, perlinos, smokey creams, and perhaps very extensively expressed pinto patterns, with an equally small group of very late greying horses. Whereas, with a tobiano, you can't tell if a horse is homozygous just by looking at him, sometimes duns are hidden under other colors etc. That would be my guess anyway.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr. 20, 2008
    Location
    The Barn :)
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    850

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by WarmbloodColor View Post
    yea!!
    Wonder why it is so expensive compared to their other tests?
    Exclusivity. Just like every other genetic test we have out there, it's pricey when it first comes out, then decreases in price as it becomes more available/common (just like Rx drugs).

    At this point, I could look at that Nature paper (where the mutation was published) design some mutant-specific primers and then extract DNA from my own horses' for under $10-15 per pop... just for start-up reagents. The more you do/order, the cheaper it gets. The machines themselves, well... there are some perks to being a scientist



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb. 23, 1999
    Location
    Cypress, near Houston, Texas
    Posts
    8,562

    Default

    Excellent, now the American Knabstrupper Association can have the test done on questionable individuals, since the gray gene is not permitted in the Knabstrupper books in North America!
    Visit Sonesta Farms website at www.sonestafarms.com or our FaceBook page at www.facebook.com/sonestafarms. Also showing & breeding Cavalier King Charles Spaniels.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan. 25, 2006
    Location
    Ferrisburgh, VT, USA
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    662

    Default

    The test will also reveal if a gray horse is heterozygous or homozygous for the gray alelle. As the owner of several young gray horses with heterozygous gray parents, I could find out which of these youngsters are heterozygous and which are homozygous.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    36,195

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dazednconfused View Post
    IWhereas, with a tobiano, you can't tell if a horse is homozygous just by looking at him, sometimes duns are hidden under other colors etc. That would be my guess anyway.
    Can't tell if a gray is homozygous either

    Hopefully the price will go down after they recoup some of their research $$

    For kicks - does anyone know if the other "normal" tests were priced higher when they first came out?
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  9. #9
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    Feb. 4, 2006
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JB View Post
    Can't tell if a gray is homozygous either

    Hopefully the price will go down after they recoup some of their research $$

    For kicks - does anyone know if the other "normal" tests were priced higher when they first came out?
    No, but the OP only said a test for the grey gene (Couldn't get their link to work). Never said whether it was able to differentiate between hetero & homozygous greys



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
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    Default

    From the Animal Genetics site:
    Animal Genetics offers DNA testing and detection of the gene mutation responsible for [FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Gray and the determination of Gray zygosity[/FONT].
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct. 3, 2002
    Location
    it's not the edge of the earth, but you can see it from here
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    12,079

    Default

    There's a stallion or two I'd risk breeding to if I knew they were heterozygous. All else being equal, if I had a 50% of not greying, I'd use them.
    InnisFailte Pinto Sporthorses & Coloured Cobs
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Bits are like cats, what's one more? (Petstorejunkie)



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb. 4, 2006
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JB View Post
    From the Animal Genetics site:

    Yes, I realize that now. Kinda arguing semantics here aren't we?



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec. 21, 2005
    Location
    New Zealand
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    517

    Default

    http://www.horsedna.co.uk/

    The gray/grey test is also available in the UK and costs 16 GBP, that's roughly $30 USD. I wonder if you can send hair samples from North America to the UK to take advantage of this lower price.



  14. #14
    Adekloet Guest

    Default

    I just wanted to explain the cost difference compared to other tests. The test has several additional components to it that make it more difficult to run. With out getting into a lot of detail we are looking at a 5000 base pair fragment as compared to other color test that only look at only a single base. Amplifying 5000 bases is much more difficult and requires a different process. The initial cost to obtain the right to use this test from a group in Sweden also costs thousands of dollars as well as 10% of revenue.

    We are sorry that the cost is slightly more than other tests and we hope to reduce it at some point.

    Thanks
    Arne



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar. 19, 2007
    Posts
    285

    Default

    Adekloet, thanks for the info. I figured it was something like that that made it more expensive...

    (now for probably a dumb question, but I was curious) --> on the site it says:

    Gray occurs in almost every breed although it is more common among a hand full of breeds. Thus far, this Gray phenotye has been linked across nine different breeds of horses including Andalusian, Arabian, Connemara, Iclandic, Lipizzaner, New Forrest Pony, Shetland pony, Thoroughbred, and Welsh.
    Does this mean that these are breeds where grey is a common color, or does it mean that the test may not yet be accurate on breeds that are not listed?

    Sorry if this is a silly Q, but I'm a bit of a color novice still and that wording had me wondering!

    Also, what other color tests are being worked on now - any more to be released soon?
    Work - feed - ride - shovel poop - repeat.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Aug. 2, 2005
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    Oak Harbor
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    It could be that those are just the breeds that the research contained, or that have been tested as of now.

    I believe that the gray test is accurate on all breeds, and the reason those are listed is one of the reasons above.

    The tests that are being worked on now are:
    Roan, splash, appy, and I believe they are working on a mutation test for dun instead of just a marker test.
    Check out my Equine Genetics Blog! Updated April 25th with Splashed White!!!
    http://equinegenetics.blogspot.com/



  17. #17
    Adekloet Guest

    Default

    The horses that we have listed are the breeds that we worked on. Other breeds are being looked into but we see no evidence that the test will not work.

    Thanks

    Arne



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Apr. 13, 2005
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    Default

    OK - maybe this has been answered somewhere along the line...but have the 'color' genes been linked (by locale)/related to/correlated with any other genes that we are aware of? Just wondering...as I have a mare who is gray - stemming from at least 7 generations back & that individual was heterozygous. Talk about a dominant gene -- would love to know if they have found any other relation with regards to the location of the color gene.

    For example, I've hear that the gray horse's jump great - this is of course anecdotal & probably not really true, but you get the idea



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jun. 15, 2001
    Location
    MA
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    Default

    "Talk about a dominant gene"? Talk about perpetual luck of the draw...how do you suppose you got all your genes? Surely not from 7 generations back?
    Disclaimer: My mom told me that people might look at my name and think I had an addiction other than horses. I don't; his name was Bravado.



  20. #20
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    Apr. 13, 2005
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BravAddict View Post
    Talk about perpetual luck of the draw...how do you suppose you got all your genes? Surely not from 7 generations back?
    I must not have been clear enough...7 generations back there is this gray horse, The Tetrarch (heterozygous). He sired a gray, who had a gray, ect. ect - leading to my gray mare. Never once were two gray's bred in my mare's pedigree increasing her odds of being gray. As a matter of fact, there is not another gray horse (who doesn't stem from The Tetrarch) in her 5-generation pedigree. Luck of the draw is right I'm too lazy to run the stats, but what are the chances that gray gene (G) would have been apparent 7 generations later (w/o a GG being added to the mix) ?!

    Clear as mud - right



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