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  1. #141
    cannert Guest

    Default One more note:

    I do want to mention that the staff was very nice and helpful. I also was impressed with the sellers meeting Friday evening; very well presented.

    I was disappointed with the footing in the indoor, something wasn't right with it, it pulled and fell away like the sand on a beach. I noticed several ponies under-saddle resisting lead changes in the indoor, even though they were swapping quite well in the outdoor. I was very disappointed with the stalls. They had huge rolling pits and were too small for the larger ponies which I know is not the fault of PAS.

    We counted approximately 60 folks including children in the stands. No way to know how many were buyers. We had folks visit the stalls that said they were spectators only.

    Finally, the braiders arrived late. I had to braid my own ponies. I had time to only braid one of my ponies because I'm not good at braiding. If this sale were held in conjunction with a show, the preview would be the show and not 2 hours right before the sale begins.



  2. #142
    Join Date
    Jun. 27, 2002
    Location
    Foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains - Heart of Hunt Country, USA
    Posts
    506

    Default The Devil is in the Details

    Mel,

    If you are well and truly in the show hunter world, you know pedigree alone is not enough - it gets buyer attention because of what the sire has produced and the increased likely hood of him producing another quality individual.

    Not knowing the details of age and size, if said pony was 2 years old and 13.2 3/4 - he is not destined for the top ranks in the larges (and everyone just settle down, I know what you are going to say - there are exceptions in every division) IMHO in can move like water, jump like a deer and look like a movie star - people looking for TOP quality prospects are looking for those that will mature at the TOP of their division, or at least within an inch. Those ponies can and will command the best prices.

    In the past, again, just MHO, a lot of lovely ponies did not sell well at the PAS sale because they were cursed with being the wrong size. It sucks for all of us when that happens to one of our babies, but when we all put on our prospective buyer hats and go looking for our child, or for a customer, we are not usually going with the intention to buy a pony who is the wrong size, the wrong size is difficult to resell and to show competively.

    The wrong sized ponies often can find a good job at the local level, but that local level pony bought for $1,000 at 2 that you keep for a year, add $2400 min and you are up to $3500 then once he is 3 start putting serious training time in him for 6 months so he is walk, trotting and cantering quietly and you have to add another min $500 a month (unless you have your own home grown jockey *grin*) and you now have a $6,500 investment pony ready for re-sale - $6,500 to break even.

    In a good market, you are going to need a pretty darn good pony to get between $7,500 and $10,000 for a "Local" pony to compete in the Childrens Division or Local Hunter. If you are buying for your own child then $3,500 is not too bad for a local pony. But a local pony is not a Top-of-the-line Prospect.

    So again, I ask, what is the criteria that should be defining a "select" pony that should be in a Select Pony Breeders sale?
    Quality is never achieved by accident - but rather by Design!
    Breeding a quality animal should always be the goal
    \"Proud Member of the Hunter Breeding Clique\"



  3. #143
    Join Date
    Sep. 2, 2003
    Posts
    1,679

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LockeMeadows View Post
    I'm very surprised (and disappointed) any reputable breeder would be willing to sell their blood, sweat, and tears for so little.
    It's hard to understand why someone would do this, but until we walk in their shoes we do not know why they do this. Sometimes people may be choosing between keeping their pony that they bred or keeping their house.....

    Times are tough right now for a lot of people.... and it just makes me so sad that a pony would end up at New Holland with a bloody head. I just hope the pony is in a happy forever home!!
    They call it PMS because Mad Cow Disease was already taken...



  4. #144
    Join Date
    Apr. 11, 2006
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    167

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LaBonnieBon View Post
    It's hard to understand why someone would do this, but until we walk in their shoes we do not know why they do this. Sometimes people may be choosing between keeping their pony that they bred or keeping their house.....

    Times are tough right now for a lot of people.... and it just makes me so sad that a pony would end up at New Holland with a bloody head. I just hope the pony is in a happy forever home!!

    Well said. Most breeders are in for the love of horses, but also as a business. Horses are not inexpensive to maintain. I can't imagine that making the desicion to forgo a reserve is an easy one to make. It's not easy to balance money, common sense, and love of the animal. I feel bad for the breeders, as well as the ponies. It sucks all the way around.



  5. #145
    Join Date
    Nov. 24, 1999
    Location
    Middleburg, VA, USA
    Posts
    44

    Default Robert Banner

    For a moment, forget what you may, or may not feel about Tim Jennings and his auctions. To me, it seems to me there is a much larger problem than individual ponies at an individual auction. Today, there are thousands upon thousands of unwanted horses in America today and the population seems to be growing exponentially. Just one small sign is that Pimilico recently announced they will be closing it's training barns to 2,000 horses. I recently read a report that there may be as many as 2 million unwanted horses in America today? Where will they go? From racehorses off the track to sporthorses that are unable to continue productive careers, where will they go? Sure, there are several repatriation efforts that warrant distinct applause. But is this enough? Will such noble efforts keep up with the growing number of horses considered "unwanted?" Will there be a market for them? Will their current owners treat them responsibly as good stewards of their future? Or succomb to mounting financial pressure to find another way? And what are their options? Is this problem about to explode?



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