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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar. 28, 2008
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    264

    Question Teaching turn on the forehand and leg yielding

    My boyfriend has been learning how to ride. He is finally at a point where he is ready to begin more advance flat work. I have been told by a couple people that my language is too advanced for him. How do I best explain how to do a turn on the forehand and leg yield to somebody who hasn't done it before?
    Last edited by MoonPie730; Aug. 6, 2008 at 05:14 PM.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul. 7, 2008
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    Default

    I always "act" as the rider from the ground (hold the rein and push on the horse) and just have them feel it... so that they get the idea of a leg yield, just overbend the horse and push him sideways. Then have them act as the outside rein and keep the horse a little straighter. Then have them control the leg. And then just walk beside and "coach" them through. Walk is easiest, obviously. A basic turn on the forehand can be taught the same way pretty much...



  3. #3
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    Jun. 13, 2001
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    usa
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    Try never to sustain an aid, pulse them, the horse will be far less defensive.
    I.D.E.A. yoda



  4. #4
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    Mar. 28, 2008
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    Awesome. Thanks for the advice! I want him to start working on more advanced exercises, but I go into WAY too much detail.



  5. #5
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    Jan. 4, 2000
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    you should not be teaching until you know what to teach based on your own experience with learning.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul. 14, 2003
    Location
    MA
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    This article should help you to explain leg yielding to him.

    http://www.artofriding.com/articles/leg-yield.html
    "Against stupidity the gods themselves contend in vain" ~Friedrich Schiller



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul. 5, 2007
    Location
    Sunny SC
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    Just wishin' I had a boyfriend that rode dressage with me!



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun. 27, 2006
    Posts
    73

    Default LY and TOF

    I agree, best to use your own experience learning to teach. Then again, everyone experiences learning and the learning process differently, so, leave room for your expectations and plan for their individuality. How did you learn LY and TOF? Did the way your instructor connect w/ you? If yes, or if a strong no, thinking back and building off your experience will probably make you be the most candid and dynamic teacher, able to answer his questions as they pop up. If you parrot COTH plans too, great, always good to have a variety of sources to make lesson plans from, but don't forget to integrate your own 'knowing' of TOF and LY to help. (I bet you don't only know it in the fancy language if you really reflect on it --- could you describe a movement to dad or mom watching an olympic test?, start there perhaps....


    BUT, as a riding instructor that teachers in a large scale program w/ a huge variety of riders, and never consistenly the same ones for more than a while(yes, not ideal for learning riding, but make the most of what you have!).... a few things I've had luck across a BROAD variety of experience levels:

    ---LY head to wall down the long side out of the corner seems easier to teach than centerline/quarterline to wall.
    ---being SURE your rider can differentiate between inside and outside leg (his/hers, and the horses, + the difference in using timing is great if they are comfortable there)
    ----as someone else suggested, you be the rider and push the horse over. So the rider isn't a total passenger, make them close eyes and tell you when inside hind is moving
    ----- I've had luck with this TOF image, its a little odd but: Pretend I've dipped your horses feet in bright red paint. Your trying to make two concentric circles. Mini circle with the front feet and big circle with the back feet. SO, you need to have the horse swing its hind end around a front end that is practically marching in place (or so it feels, because the inner circle is so small). Use one leg to push them around, fingers to remind hte horse to keep the inner circle small.
    ----Always do quarter TOF w/ new riders so they don't focus on spinning the poor horse in dizzying circles. Or even a "goal" of changing direction. Just get the movement, and let them enjoy that.

    I do think its important to push people in their flatwork and dressage, even just before they are ready, at one stage. Of course, never to the detriment of the horse, but we have a great deficit of riding interest here, and feeling things like lateral movements can often be hooks for keeping new riders interested. I do like to give riders a 'taste' and then tell them what they need to go back on in order to ask the horse to do such things in a 'nicer' or 'quieter' language. Good motivation tool too.

    Good luck! And good job sharing riding w/ the bf!
    Remember courage is not the absence of fear; it is doing what you need to do in spite of your fear. -Sue Foley.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar. 10, 2006
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    891

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    When I teach LY, I break it down into three things... straightness (hence rider pointing belly button straight forward, soft contact for beginners. If you tell them outside rein, they tend to do too much), suggesting to the horse "not forward" to prepare the horse to move side ways (hence rider need to use half halt), then lastly yield (hence rider aid horse to yield at rib cage). As the student progresses, add things like outside rein, flexion to the inside, more leg crossing... as needed.

    Each thing can be broken down and practiced on its own... then put back together one by one, like building blocks.

    Same thing as turn on the forehand. Teach halt. Then move quarter over, quarter turn... walk forward. Personally I don't teach turn on the forehand. Leg yield is a much better building block, in my opinion.



  10. #10
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    Mar. 28, 2008
    Posts
    264

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    Quote Originally Posted by slc2 View Post
    you should not be teaching until you know what to teach based on your own experience with learning.
    I didn't ask for your opinion on that.

    I am having a hard time teaching him because I use too many technical terms and it confuses him. It's been years since I was "taught" how to do a turn on the forehand and leg yielding. So I can't remember how it was explained to me in an easy simple way.

    Next time someone asks a question, try answering it.



  11. #11
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    Mar. 28, 2008
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    264

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by luckyducky1983 View Post
    I agree, best to use your own experience learning to teach. Then again, everyone experiences learning and the learning process differently, so, leave room for your expectations and plan for their individuality. How did you learn LY and TOF? Did the way your instructor connect w/ you? If yes, or if a strong no, thinking back and building off your experience will probably make you be the most candid and dynamic teacher, able to answer his questions as they pop up. If you parrot COTH plans too, great, always good to have a variety of sources to make lesson plans from, but don't forget to integrate your own 'knowing' of TOF and LY to help. (I bet you don't only know it in the fancy language if you really reflect on it --- could you describe a movement to dad or mom watching an olympic test?, start there perhaps....


    BUT, as a riding instructor that teachers in a large scale program w/ a huge variety of riders, and never consistenly the same ones for more than a while(yes, not ideal for learning riding, but make the most of what you have!).... a few things I've had luck across a BROAD variety of experience levels:

    ---LY head to wall down the long side out of the corner seems easier to teach than centerline/quarterline to wall.
    ---being SURE your rider can differentiate between inside and outside leg (his/hers, and the horses, + the difference in using timing is great if they are comfortable there)
    ----as someone else suggested, you be the rider and push the horse over. So the rider isn't a total passenger, make them close eyes and tell you when inside hind is moving
    ----- I've had luck with this TOF image, its a little odd but: Pretend I've dipped your horses feet in bright red paint. Your trying to make two concentric circles. Mini circle with the front feet and big circle with the back feet. SO, you need to have the horse swing its hind end around a front end that is practically marching in place (or so it feels, because the inner circle is so small). Use one leg to push them around, fingers to remind hte horse to keep the inner circle small.
    ----Always do quarter TOF w/ new riders so they don't focus on spinning the poor horse in dizzying circles. Or even a "goal" of changing direction. Just get the movement, and let them enjoy that.

    I do think its important to push people in their flatwork and dressage, even just before they are ready, at one stage. Of course, never to the detriment of the horse, but we have a great deficit of riding interest here, and feeling things like lateral movements can often be hooks for keeping new riders interested. I do like to give riders a 'taste' and then tell them what they need to go back on in order to ask the horse to do such things in a 'nicer' or 'quieter' language. Good motivation tool too.

    Good luck! And good job sharing riding w/ the bf!
    Thanks! The problem is, it's been YEARS since I was taught how and I can't remember how my trainer explained it to me, I have had a couple trainers since the original one explained it to me. I ride jumpers so it's not something that I even do/did in my lessons, but I believe flatwork is crucial and I want my boyfriend to be able to know how to do these things. He is getting doing it alright, but I realized that I make things WAY more complicated then they need to be.



  12. #12
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    Jun. 20, 2006
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    Ft. Collins, CO
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Eclectic Horseman View Post
    This article should help you to explain leg yielding to him.

    http://www.artofriding.com/articles/leg-yield.html
    Thanks for the link. Great website, and she keeps it simple.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov. 9, 2005
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    uk
    Posts
    15,268

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    here this will help you to-- has diagrams of all the basic movements for you
    http://www.eques.com.au/training/june/forward.htm



  14. #14
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    Mar. 28, 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by goeslikestink View Post
    here this will help you to-- has diagrams of all the basic movements for you
    http://www.eques.com.au/training/june/forward.htm
    Thank you! This website has excellent information.



  15. #15
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    your welcome



  16. #16
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    Moonpie, if you really understood it, you wouldn't need any complicated words. That's the answer to your question, if you need to ask others what to say to simplify, you don't understand it well enough to teach it. Sorry, and I know you just want a fast easy answer and that saying you can only teach in complicated words sounds really great (almost outright bragging), but the truth of it is, if you really understand it, you can teach it very simply - and that's the real answer to your question. If you need someone to tell you how to say it, you're not ready to teach. You can take the words people give you here and repeat them, but there's more to teaching something than that.



  17. #17
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    Sep. 6, 2007
    Location
    San Diego
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    That IS a great site. Thanks GLS!



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