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  1. #21
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    Wow, great information here! I'll go over to CVS and stock up on some of the stuff to mix with the desitin, just in case. I think the cream I have from the vet has made some progress, but I'd rather not have to buy that every time if there is something that will work better.



  2. #22
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    Dec. 13, 1999
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    Greensboro, NC
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    Quote Originally Posted by LuvMyTB View Post
    Believe me, if I could, I would. This is a great barn but it is not full service and they don't usually do this kind of thing--blanketing, applying scratches goop, etc. Not to mention the fact that my mare is sometimes kind of a one-girl horse and the barn help is a bit hesitant around her.
    Poo

    Quote Originally Posted by okggo View Post
    Wow, great information here! I'll go over to CVS and stock up on some of the stuff to mix with the desitin, just in case. I think the cream I have from the vet has made some progress, but I'd rather not have to buy that every time if there is something that will work better.
    I have sometimes found cortisone cream for CHEAP at the Dollar store
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  3. #23
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    JB, you have me questioning the diet now.

    This filly was raised on alfalfa/orchard grass and then grass pasture, but then moved to a barn where she got timothy and grass. That grass melted away to nothing but a weed field fairly quickly. We just recently did a few disruptive things to her. We weaned her, and we moved her to a place with lush grass, and 24/7 alf/timothy/orch hay. I assumed the move + weaning shot her little immune system all the heck and so she became succeptable. Now I'm wondering if it is the grass/alfalfa. She gets A LOT (as in majorly significantly) less sun exposure here then she did at the other place.

    Hmm.



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jul. 27, 2006
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    Mississippi
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    We are currently treating my horse for a case of scratches. He has 4 high stockings. His front legs cleared up very quickly, but his hinds are taking a little longer to clear. It's also going up his white stocking. He has had very little swelling, and the scabs are almost black. It doesn't bother him when I touch it. I've got a call in to my vet to see if I need to do something else since the hinds didn't respond like his fronts. We used the diaper rash cream, triple antibiotic cream, and dewormer.



  5. #25
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    Dec. 13, 1999
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    Greensboro, NC
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    What does she get, if anything, besides hay?

    It may not be what she IS getting, could be what she's missing.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  6. #26
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    Nov. 29, 2007
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    IL
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    Quote Originally Posted by JB View Post
    What does she get, if anything, besides hay?

    It may not be what she IS getting, could be what she's missing.
    JB--for those of us who are having these problems, what should we be looking for in our horses' diets? I am admittedly not that knowledgeable about equine nutrition......

    My mare gets 6 lbs daily of Triple Crown Senior, hay, grass during turnout, and 1 oz each daily of Corta-Flex pellets and Mystic Mare (raspberry leaves).



  7. #27
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    Jul. 27, 2006
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    Mississippi
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    My horse gets Enrich 12 with free choice grass hay and grass. I also have Purina 12:12 minerals out, but I've never seen him touch them.



  8. #28
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    Dec. 13, 1999
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    Greensboro, NC
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    Quote Originally Posted by LuvMyTB View Post
    JB--for those of us who are having these problems, what should we be looking for in our horses' diets? I am admittedly not that knowledgeable about equine nutrition......

    My mare gets 6 lbs daily of Triple Crown Senior, hay, grass during turnout, and 1 oz each daily of Corta-Flex pellets and Mystic Mare (raspberry leaves).
    One of the biggies seems to be Copper, and that has been my experience. When I started supplementing Copper for my WB gelding, I never had another scratches problem, and I dealt with it for, oh...4-5 years, especially in the Summer with shorter hair on his white legs and ESPECIALLY when I clipped his whites (not even all that close) the first time each Spring. Never another problem since then.

    I think even the NRC is a bit low on the Cu requirements.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  9. #29
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    Feb. 5, 2002
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    I've taken a little different approach the past couple times and it's worked fast and easily. I don't wash the leg - at all. I take the concoction I get from the vet, which is probably exactly what you've all described (desitin, antibiotic, antifungal, steriod) and use it to soften the scabs, rubbing it in with my fingers and gently working at the scabs from the edges. When I've done as much as I can, I put on some more and wrap in about 1/2 roll of vetrap. Then leave it for a day or two. When you cut off the vetrap, the scabs come too. Repeat, and continue treating for at least 2 or 3 days past the time you think it's all healed. This time around, there was a lot of pink skin and it's summer so I gave him a few days of just desitin as a sunscreen. My horses are rough boarded so there's no option of keeping them out of the dew, so I think the vetrap makes a big difference. For the one who had scratches right down at the coronary band, making it hard to keep the vetrap in place, I put bell boots over the vetrap and it held it in place really, really well.



  10. #30
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    Jul. 16, 2005
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    Maryland
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    [quote=JB;3415649]Was your "desitin routine" just desitin?

    Desitin (40% zinc oxide, not 10%), neosporin ointment, cortisone cream, possibly add some gynolotrimin or athlete's foot cream and even some fenbendazole paste (ie Safeguard) or some ivermectin paste - mix well, apply liberally at least twice a day, just wiping the old stuff off.

    definitely add ivermectin paste & fungicide (athlete's foot cream) to the mix. scrub off the old scabs (my vet recommended that) and LIBERALLY apply the cream 2x/day

    it takes a while..but works. we had a horrible case last year along w/ greasy heel
    <)__~~
    <\ <\,,
    The delicate and exquisite horse is itself a work of art.



  11. #31
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    Dec. 15, 2005
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    Akron, Ohio
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    Default Remedy for Scratches

    I'm not really a "poster", but must share this with all of you. My horse had scratches so bad he became stocked up in his stall and extremely uncomfortable; i.e. it really got away from me and I had to call the vet since any of the remedies mentioned did not touch it. Here's the recipe my vet prescribed:

    Receipe for Scratches:

    3 10ml tubes (syringes) of Cefa-Lak
    and mix with
    1 10mg/5gm power packet Dexamethasone (azium)

    This mixture makes enough for one application to cover maybe both lower hind legs.

    Clean affected area with soap and water and dry with clean cloth (as much as you can). Mix and apply. I cover the area with gauze and vet wrap - not just to keep the dirt out but to get the mixture to soak in. Even if the bandage is on over night or just for a couple hours, it's better than nothing and no big deal if your horse gets it off in the stall or pasture. Whatever is in this mixture kills the organism/bacteria or whatever it is that causes the scratches and the mixture also softens the gunk so you can peal it off without horsey going through the roof. If you read the contents of both these ingredients, it's pretty powerful stuff. Confirm with your vet, but I was told the farmers use Cefa-Lak to kill staph in the cow's udder.

    Since this bout, I've done some preventative, such as making sure my Boy's legs are trimmed and clean, he's in fly boots when he goes out and he's on a potent antioxident supplement. He still gets spots here and there (knock on the side of the head). A dab of silver sulphadine (sp?) seems to ward it off.

    Hope that helps you all - I know it's no fun.
    Demereaux
    Yesterday is history, tomorrow is a mystery and today is a gift.



  12. #32
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    Aug. 26, 2003
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    Quote Originally Posted by JB View Post
    What does she get, if anything, besides hay?

    It may not be what she IS getting, could be what she's missing.
    Grass, free choice timothy/alf/orchard and as far as a ration she gets TDI 30 ration balancer and oats (and now pro-bios) and free choice minerals.

    Dem, is that all prescription?



  13. #33
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    Apr. 14, 2006
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    Saco, Maine
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    Good grief, do NOT pick those scabs!!
    Here's the 4-day-cure recipe:
    Mix together equal parts:

    Thick Desitin Ointment (NOT cream)
    Neo-Sporin ointment, not cream. Pain formula is fine
    Furacin
    Monistat
    Desenex
    Tinactin
    Hydro-Cortizone

    Wash gently with a gentle antibacterial soap-Nolvasan is good, Betadine is strong but also good) Rinse well, PAT dry. Do not scrub. Some scabs will come off, that's fine but do not pick and pull any off. When the area is dry, rub in gently and well a heavy amount of your new ointment. Slap on a few 4x4" gauze pads and wrap with cotton standing wraps. Leave wrapped 12-24 hours. Unwrap, reapply ointment, re-wrap. Your problem will be healed by the end of the 4th day. I'd keep wrapping for a few more days tho, just to be sure.
    Last edited by RiverBendPol; Aug. 5, 2008 at 11:36 PM.



  14. #34
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    Apr. 4, 2007
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    Jasper, GA
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    MY NEWEST GREATEST,GREATEST WONDER DRUG FOR SCRATCHES IS... (drum roll)...

    The newly formulated 10% benzoyl peroxide cream or gel over the counter for acne. There is also a 10% bar (soap) that can be applied, left on for fifteen minutes and washed off.
    (It used to be that only 3% was sold over the counter).
    This stuff is a wonder drug for scratches. My vet in GA (Dr. Williamson) told me about it and she is right. I LOVE THIS STUFF!!!!

    Now, if your horse has heat in the area, a lot of swelling, she/he has a secondary infection. SMZ are the best to knock that down. You want to tx with Ab because cellulitis is soon to follow, once infected.

    With 14 Percherons and living in GA, I have used just about all the methods above. They all have their good, bad and ugly points. I still like triple antibiotic cream as my second favorite. Also, uniprim mixed in with lanolin/vasoline works well (udder butter -we make our own) -if you want to try something different.

    Things I hate: DMSO. Anything that burns my horses (and drafts have very tender skin) isn't ok with me.
    Luistano Stallion standing for 2013: Wolverine UVF
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8IZPHDzgX3s



  15. #35
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    May. 28, 2008
    Posts
    5

    Smile miracle

    I have battled scratches for 3 years with my quarter horse. I have tried everything to no avail. This year a new vet looks at my guy, takes 20 seconds and gives me Frontline spray. Supposedly there are 3 different kinds of scratches...bacterial, fungal and parasitic. My kind must have been parasitic, because I did find this to be the "miracle". A couple of weeks later my daughters horse came down with scratches that she battled for 3 weeks with shampoos, topicals, antibiotics. After 3 weeks she insisted on this spray and her guy cleared up in a couple of days, without any further scrubs, picking or topicals. Just spray it on the affected leg or legs from the knee/hock to the coronary band and kind of ruffle it into the hair and leave it. Repeat it in a week.



  16. #36
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    Aug. 26, 2003
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    You know what....vets are annoying (well, the vet that did my farm call is). Really. My vet came out, "looked" aka sideways glance at her initially and gave us med shampoo and the treatment to scrub, etc. So I've been reading up on this photosensitivity b/c some posters mentioned alfalfa and it is maybe a week or two after getting alfalfa this problem started. http://www.horsereview.com/Happy%20T...ensitivity.htm this is EXACTLY what her legs look like EXACTLY. That picture could be her. So needless to say we are pulling the falf. But I'm just a bit ticked off that per the VETS orders I have been causing this filly needless and on-going pain for 2 going on 3 weeks now. It burns me big time. She never asked about diet, never suggested a biopsy, just kinda glanced at her and said "yup scratches are bad right now."

    Grrrr. Moral of this story goes along with what others have been saying, if the "over the shelf" treatments don't work right away something else is going on and if your vet doesn't care enough to find out what, find a new vet.



  17. #37
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    Oct. 21, 2003
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    Quote Originally Posted by okggo View Post
    You know what....vets are annoying (well, the vet that did my farm call is). Really. My vet came out, "looked" aka sideways glance at her initially and gave us med shampoo and the treatment to scrub, etc. So I've been reading up on this photosensitivity b/c some posters mentioned alfalfa and it is maybe a week or two after getting alfalfa this problem started. http://www.horsereview.com/Happy%20T...ensitivity.htm this is EXACTLY what her legs look like EXACTLY. That picture could be her. So needless to say we are pulling the falf. But I'm just a bit ticked off that per the VETS orders I have been causing this filly needless and on-going pain for 2 going on 3 weeks now. It burns me big time. She never asked about diet, never suggested a biopsy, just kinda glanced at her and said "yup scratches are bad right now."

    Grrrr. Moral of this story goes along with what others have been saying, if the "over the shelf" treatments don't work right away something else is going on and if your vet doesn't care enough to find out what, find a new vet.
    I am glad you are realizing that. Seriously, if some sort of "magic goop" is going to work, you should see radical improvement within a couple days. If you are BATTLING this for weeks or months or years, well sorry to say but it's you that is making it worse.

    I talked to a handful of trainers and multiple local vets about my horse, not one of them got it right. I don't even bother with local vets anymore except for vaccinations and emergencies, and bought a rig so I can go to the University vet school for everything. I have had more local vets do more harm than good in so many instances, I scratch my head in wonder what the problem is.



  18. #38
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    Mar. 6, 2002
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    We have seen incredible results at my trainer's barn using just baking soda and water. Mix about a cup or two of regular old baking soda with enough water to make a paste, then smear it all over the legs. Let it dry. You can brush it off before you ride the next day (if you use boots or wraps on the legs) or just hose it off and reapply.
    Seriously, it works. I was very doubtful that something so simple would make any difference, but within 3 days of treatments my horse's legs were dry and the scabs were healing, and after a few more days there was soft skin and new hair growth.
    This was recommended by a vet who specializes in natural medicine. It's by far the cheapest cure, since you can get a big bag of Arm & Hammer at Costco for about $5. A cup of baking soda treats 2 legs. If your horse has rain rot or oozing hives elsewhere on his body, you can make a heavy solution of baking soda & water and sponge it on like a body wash.
    Amateur rider, professional braider.
    ----
    Save a life, adopt a pet.



  19. #39
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    May. 15, 2008
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    I posted it before and I'll post it again...
    SEASHORE ACRES
    In mild cases of scratches and sometimes even yucky but not advanced cases of scratches this stuff works wonders. It's a natural remedy and it contains cortisone.
    Also, be pro-active in early Spring or before Spring begins and shave horses legs to the knee and keep them dry if you know that the horse is susceptible. Yes the hair is a natural defense to a horses leg, however if they have these problems it's better to just prevent them from happening and removing the hair ahead of time instead of having to deal with this on-going problem during the Summer months.



  20. #40
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    Aug. 26, 2003
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    Yes, I think all these scratches suggestions are helpful IF the horse has scratches of the variety that respond to them. I don't think ANY of them work if the problem is systemic or related to some other issue. This clover/alf thing for instance, you can treat til you turn blue but until you eliminate the cause (the food) all you will end up with are sore POed horses.

    TRUST me on this, I'm in the process of learning the hard way right now, and I was going by vet guidance. I've treated scratches with desitin before and always had almost immediate response. It did NOTHING this go around. That should have been my clue something else was going on, but again I followed the vet.

    Thanks to JB and Pinto Piaffe and others who mentioned the alfalfa. And thanks to the others of you who suggested there may be something else going on. And thanks for the scratches suggestions too, always nice to have on hand incase that IS the beast you are dealing with.



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