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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul. 9, 2008
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    724

    Default Why Do Trainers Ride Your Horses?

    I've been reading alot on here about people paying trainers to ride their horses. Why?

    I bought a completely unbroke, hot, too athletic for it's own good 3 year old in January which I intend to put every mile on myself. I wouldn't get the same satisfaction going in the show ring and doing well if someone else put the miles on.

    If I'm going to pay 1/100th of a million for a creature I'm going to be the one riding it. Even if I had all the money in the world I wouldn't pay someone to ride my horses.

    Can't wait to hear peoples thoughts, and reasonings?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul. 7, 2008
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
    Posts
    217

    Default

    My trainer has gotten on my mare once, and only once -- to show me how nicely she was moving after we took her shoes off. If a horse is being exceptionally snotty and Paula feels that the rider is only making it worse or can't control it, she'll get on and do what needs to be done. I don't think I would be able to live with myself if I couldn't control my horse right out of the stall and had to have my trainer get on and "school her" every time before we showed.
    I agree with you completely.
    THE NUMBER ONE REASON HORSES ARE BETTER THAN BOYS:
    a horse will love you forever!



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb. 15, 2007
    Location
    often between a rock and hard place in Ky
    Posts
    4,824

    Default

    Cuz I suck.....


    Just kidding. I pay my trainer to ride my horse 1 day a week for now because he needs some fine tuning to make the transition from jumpers to hunters that I am unable to do. I am an adult re-reider .. awww who am I kidding I started over from scratch and my daughter is 14. My horse is a saint and honest but needs fine tuning that I just don't know how to do. I watch some of the training rides, the trainer explains what the goal is and I can really feel the difference in my horse.

    So basically I am still learning and my horse is still learning and I don't have the skill set to train him myself.
    ___._/> I don't suffer from insanity.. I enjoy every
    ____/ minute of it! Member stick horse art lovers
    ';;;;;;; clique
    //__\\<-- Don't feed the llama!



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun. 12, 2007
    Location
    CT
    Posts
    6,065

    Default

    For the most part I agree, but when I can't ride 5+ days a week with a 3 month under saddle opinionated horse- her training seriously deteriorates. She needs to keep going without me on the days I can't make it. It's hard enough dealing with her after her day off - I couldn't imagine if that was every ride.

    Other than that, I broke and will put the 'miles' on her, and I usually do not do pro rides on a trained horse, except for a one off thing to get her to feel something/try a new approach.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr. 25, 2007
    Posts
    42

    Default

    thats my theory 100%!
    i buy my horses, i ride them... enough said.

    but i guess, if you have the money, and think of it as a buisness, you want the horse to preform. the rider may not have the ability to deal with the horse, and work out its 'problems'.

    its good for the horse to have a good schooling with an educated rider, who's had the miles and experiance, every once in a while, but if you're showing the horse, learn to ride though everything, with your coach on the ground.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2005
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    1,822

    Default

    I'm not talented or experienced enough to keep my horse in tip top shape. I can only ride three days a week, so I like my horse to get schooled by a pro when I'm not riding.

    To me, it's a matter of personal preference. One way is not necessarily better or worse than the other...everyone makes different choices for different reasons.
    ~ Citizens for a Kinder, Gentler COTH...our mantra: Be nice. ~



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep. 6, 2003
    Location
    WA, Land of the damp Thongpend
    Posts
    2,451

    Default

    I bought a 2 year old, who is now 4. My trainer rides him because that is what I wish. He also shows him. I'm working on being ancient and don't want to show myself at all anymore. I do love the horses, love watching and owning a good one and he is. I ride him sometimes but I get more pleasure out of watching him change and grow and figure things out with Mr. Trainer. He also has a hell of a jump and I would be on the ground in a heart beat. I did the young ones when I was younger and riding all the time, I had 8 years off while my last old guy was retired and hanging out until he passed away, I owned him 19 years. So I was in no shape to start a baby.

    I'm still part of the process, I am pretty good on the ground so we talk about things, I make suggestions and he actually does them, but I am the only client in the barn that is allowed to do that. I've been around and doing this longer than Mr. Trainer has been alive, but he is a talented rider and nothing phases him.

    I just write the checks. I'm happy to do it.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul. 9, 2008
    Posts
    724

    Default

    Love the feedback so far. Just wanted to clarify in case someone takes it the wrong way that I'm not trying to look down on the people that have trainers ride their horses, start fights or whatever. Just looking to hear why people make some of the choices they make.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr. 7, 2005
    Posts
    180

    Default

    I'm not sure why there seems to be this negative connotation in this thread about professional rides on ammy's horses. People who choose to have their horses regularly ridden and schooled by pros shouldn't be looked down upon for not being real riders, or tough riders, or for being lazy riders. That seems to be the angle I'm hearing.

    The great thing about riding is that it's a 2 creature sport: rider and horse. A tennis teacher/professional doesn't have anything to do but teach the student, but a trainer in our sport can train the rider and then train the horse in order to make the PAIR better. You have a trainer for yourself, and don't look down upon that sort of training, why look down upon having that same person get on and work one-on-one with the horse? Why NOT have a good pro ride? It can only help!



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul. 7, 2008
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
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    217

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by "A"HunterGal View Post
    I'm not sure why there seems to be this negative connotation in this thread about professional rides on ammy's horses. People who choose to have their horses regularly ridden and schooled by pros shouldn't be looked down upon for not being real riders, or tough riders, or for being lazy riders. That seems to be the angle I'm hearing.

    The great thing about riding is that it's a 2 creature sport: rider and horse. A tennis teacher/professional doesn't have anything to do but teach the student, but a trainer in our sport can train the rider and then train the horse in order to make the PAIR better. You have a trainer for yourself, and don't look down upon that sort of training, why look down upon having that same person get on and work one-on-one with the horse? Why NOT have a good pro ride? It can only help!
    I don't think that's what the OP is referring to.. I think she's talking more about the people that just throw money to ride their horse during the week, train the horse, get them ready for a show.. and then the owner plops on and reaps all the glory and benefits. THAT'S the kind of thing I can't stand.
    THE NUMBER ONE REASON HORSES ARE BETTER THAN BOYS:
    a horse will love you forever!



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb. 23, 2008
    Posts
    391

    Default

    My horse is ridden by my trainer because I due to lack of talent and injury cannot effectively train my horse. Why spend months pissing off and confusing my horse, when I can have my trainer ride him twice, and have him be able to understand what I'm trying to accomplish, it is just much less frustration for all of us.



  12. #12
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    Jul. 9, 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Big Bay Mare View Post
    I don't think that's what the OP is referring to.. I think she's talking more about the people that just throw money to ride their horse during the week, train the horse, get them ready for a show.. and then the owner plops on and reaps all the glory and benefits. THAT'S the kind of thing I can't stand.
    If you're talking about my original post thats not exactly what I was saying. I slightly touch on that scenario but mainly I wanted to know why people paid trainers to ride their horses in general, whether it be because they don't want to school a green horse or whatever.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2004
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    400

    Default

    I don't think I would always have my trainer putting in rides. However, if nothing else I would certainly have a trainer put the first 50 miles on a hot, unbroken athletic horse due to my parental responsibilities to very young children.

    Mr. Blt, children, and other animals rely on me, I sure would look like an arse if I got hurt!
    Collector of fine ponies.

    In loving memory of Mr.Zipp 3-25-72 / 11-4-08



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2008
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    840

    Default

    My horse has seen less than 30 days of any professional. I can't stand someone else training my horses, I use different cues than most others. My four year old was broken out by me and started at w/t by me, but I had some issues with cantering, and that's all the trainer worked on, smooth transition into the canter.

    I hate going to shows and seeing the trainer working the horse the night before and day of the show, the owner/rider just hops on for a quick lap around the warm up ring and goes in to win. Where's the pride in that?
    To be loved by a horse, or by any animal, should fill us with awe-
    for we have not deserved it.
    Marion Garretty



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jul. 8, 2005
    Posts
    34

    Default

    I appreciate the "do-it-yourself" ethic -- I really do. I was that person myself for quite some time.

    I have started horses, and put miles on them myself. I actually think that "backing" and getting the "walk, trot, canter" under their belts is the easiest. Putting the polish on and making it "stick" is the tough part. If you have a greenie and aren't dead-on accurate the vast majority of the time (or can sit chilly enough to let them figure it out on their own); if you "lie" to your horse by getting out in front of them more than once; if you create a "bank" of bad experiences in your horse's mind that eventually lead to bad behaviors, then that can be hard to undo. At this juncture, I would rather ensure that my horse has a store of good experiences that can keep him happy about his work, rather than muddling through and risk creating a wreck.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jul. 7, 2008
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
    Posts
    217

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kitsunegari View Post
    If you're talking about my original post thats not exactly what I was saying. I slightly touch on that scenario but mainly I wanted to know why people paid trainers to ride their horses in general, whether it be because they don't want to school a green horse or whatever.
    AH, well, I stated that that's what I THOUGHT you said.
    I apologize for missinterpreting.
    THE NUMBER ONE REASON HORSES ARE BETTER THAN BOYS:
    a horse will love you forever!



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jul. 9, 2008
    Posts
    724

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by The Big Bay Mare View Post
    AH, well, I stated that that's what I THOUGHT you said.
    I apologize for missinterpreting.
    Didn't mean to have that come off in a bad way. I know this whole subject can be very touchy to some and I don't want to step on anyones toes.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jun. 15, 2008
    Posts
    318

    Default

    My trainer only gets on my horse every once in a while when he needs it. Other than that its pretty much just me. She has only ridden him about 4 or 5times.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    May. 28, 2008
    Posts
    773

    Default

    My trainer gets on my horse once a week (if that, we've been lax lately) because my horse likes to test me. We are both stubborn personality-wise, and I lack experience in how to deal with difficult issues, so often my trainer will try to work through my horse's issues that I'm unsure of how to handle before it blows up into a big mess. Often it helps her explain to me how to deal with a problem better. Mostly, I just find it beneficial to the both of us to the trainer school my horse once a week, although I realize it's not strictly necessary.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Feb. 11, 2008
    Location
    In the middle of Texas
    Posts
    635

    Default

    Personally, I love having my mare under professional training full-time. She needs that kind of consistency and a 'job'. Plus, the fact that the trainer is confident and doesn't let her get away with anything is great. I, on the other hand, try not to let her get away with things, but probably do.

    She's been ridden consistently by a pro for over a year (and off/on for the past 3-4 years). When she doesn't have a 'job' she becomes a wild child (hard to catch, sort of throws her head, gets too energetic). But, when she is being worked anywhere from 3-6 days a weeks she is a perfect little thing. Now, that she's at a closer barn I ride her in the evenings for about 45 minutes daily. She's starting hardcore training again on the first! I'm so happy that the trainer will whip both of us into shape

    I simply cannot get out to the barn or devote the necessary time to get her to the point she needs to be at. I go to college full-time, work well over full-time, and have a life outside of horses (barely).

    I'm not the type of owner that just shows up at the shows for a trip around the warm-up ring and off into the main ring. I switched barns for that reason. I take lessons on my mare and work through the problems under supervision. She just needs more than I can do.

    I haven't shown my current horse yet. But, when she is completely ready my trainer will show her for me a few times. Once she is okay with the craziness of the show grounds I will start showing her.

    **I am trying to overcome some confidence issues and we've decided (Myself and my trainer) that this would be the best way to do it. **

    I don't get it! I used to be so brave. But, since I almost got seriously hurt a few months back I'm actually scared at times...I've got to get over this.



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