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  1. #41
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    Jul. 11, 2004
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    I love dogs...despise them at the barn. Barn = Horses, Kennel = Dogs.

    -Hate having my stuff peed on.
    -Scraping dog crap off my boots.
    -A dog jumping up on me.
    -Dogs spooking the horses.
    -Idiot owners locking their dogs in a stall while we hear their incessant barking and lungeing as we walk our horse down the aisle.

    For dog owners who just HAVE to have your dog everywhere with you: You can survive without little Fluffy with you, we don't like your dog, we don't find him cute or adorable, his "quirks" aren't endearing, he's not as well trained as you think he is, just because we have horses doesn't mean we like your dog, when he growls at us we'd prefer kicking him across the ring. It's a dog...not a child or your cosmic partner. You pay for your horses board, not a kennel. We pay for our horses board, not to put up with your bloody mutt...this isn't "doggie day care". We can get hurt because of your selfishness and basic stupidity...if your dog chases my horse/kid/friend, I'll kill it, right now with whatever is at hand to protect them...you dog will always lose.

    Of course, a lot of these comments are applicable to parents..(well, breeders actually, parents watch their kids)...who bring their untrained brats to the barn and expect the adults to watch them while they ride.



  2. #42
    Join Date
    Mar. 25, 2008
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    Goshen NY
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    2,639

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    You know what I hate is: We have a private farm and outside people bring their dogs; the farriers, chiro, friends, etc. I really hate this dog running in, eating all the cat food, peeing on the hay, running all over while we're either trying to do feet, whatever. And, Jacks are the worst - sorry!

    The people always ask, can I let the dog out of the car? They usually preface it by saying my dog is so good and as they say this the dog is peeing/crapping on my hay pile behind their backs. I usually say yes but just cringe at all the damage these dogs do.

    We also had a person who came to care for our horses while we were on vacation. They brought their dog. Again, crap in an empty stall to beat the band that I had to clean up after the vacation.

    So leave your "well-trained" dog in the car wouldja please?



  3. #43
    Join Date
    Jul. 21, 2006
    Location
    South Carolina
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    5,046

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    Quote Originally Posted by pines4equines View Post
    The people always ask, can I let the dog out of the car?
    To which I always reply, "Yes, if he's leashed." If the person is ill-mannered enough to press (oh, s/he stays right with me), I mentally mark the person's name on my list of impolite jerks (I can't imagine going to someone's home and insisting my dog be given the run of their property) and say "Sorry, no exceptions. Insurance, y'know."

    My horses are generally terrific with dogs but my little paint horse will chase any that venture into his pasture. Then of course you have panicked dog owner trying to get between Quanah-with-cutting-horse-delusions and pursued canine, which while entertaining to watch, is just not safe.



  4. #44
    Join Date
    Sep. 25, 2007
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    TN
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    Just on of my observations. People who have small dogs such as JRTs are usually not as adamant about traing as those of us wiyh larger more poweful breeds. Around horses any dog, regardless of size can be dangerous.



  5. #45
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    Mar. 25, 2008
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    Goshen NY
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    2,639

    Default Hay 2

    And, the big dogs are bad too. They get all excited when they're at a new place. There is a smell of cats, raccoons and these dogs run all over in an excited manner.

    We had one person bring her dog while she worked on our horses. That really annoyed me as this dog was erratic and frenetic but she thought it was cute..and it was a big dog. Our horses were not used to dogs and it just made me all around nervous having this thing dashing here and there while we're working on a horse and turning out other horses. If I'm nervous, my horses are nervous.

    Please if you're going to clients, leave your dog in the car or at home. (I have another farrier who would bring his basset hound and this thing was so old that it would sleep in the car while he was working on the horses...now that is a dog I can get around!) But if your dog is frenetic and you're going to a client's farm, just leave the dog in the car. No one else thinks your dog is cute. Sorry!



  6. #46
    Join Date
    Mar. 14, 2008
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    129

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    Love dogs, love horses, and I respect other people like me. Fortunately, I am the BO, and have 6 kids and their parents who are regulars, some have dogs, some are nice dogs. My dogs are good dogs, but I keep them up when anyone other than myself and spouse are around. We have ten total, all but two are Border Collies, and they'll try to get visitors involved in a game of toss, and next thing I know, it gets into a pasture or too close to the kids and their horses, so I gave up having even one of them loose around visitors.
    This makes it easier for me to impose my dog ethic on visitors as well, no dogs around the horses. One mom will take her dog out for a walk around the farm away from the activity, but she's very careful and responsible, so it's not an issue. I have crates in the tackroom for people's dogs if it's too hot/cold to leave them in the car, and kennels outside they can use. Nobody has an issue with it, but if they did, they have the option of not coming to the barn.
    I used to work for a BO who had a favorite boarder who rode her horse, worked over fences and everything, while her big dog (a sporting breed) galloped alongside, in front of, behind, and all over. I gave up riding in the ring at the same time, too scary, I worried over the dog's safety and mine. Concentration went out the door. We had chickens around for awhile for tick control, this poor dog nixed them, dog owner apologetically said it was her instinct as a bird dog, and she was really upset about it, but defended her right as a client who had the BO's permission to have the dog there.
    As for Rotties, I've known a lot a really nice ones, but having one is an insurance nightmare...a friend of mine has three and her homeowner's insurance is a joke. More power to you if you can have one loose in a public setting such as a boarding barn.



  7. #47
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    Jan. 17, 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Huntertwo View Post
    Someone's nasty horse hurting your dog?? It is the horse's home for goodness sake. Sheesh!
    That's right. My horse is expected to behave in a certain way which includes not being an aggressive a$$hole, same as my dog (both were gelded/neutered late in life so they both came to me with a bit of an attitude). I don't accept that behaviour from any of my animals but I know many that do. I am far more concerned about a 1200 pound jerk than my 115 pound well behaved dog. It is ironic how some might object to a well trained dog but think their spoiled jerk horse is cute. I don't care if it is their home or not. Far more dangerous in my opinion.

    I had one of those nasty horses as a kid and it took me a long time for him to learn any manners and he would go out of his way to savage any dog, cat... He put a real dent in the barn cat population. I wouldn't want my dog around that kind of horse was my point.
    "look deep into his pedigree. Look for the name of a one-of-a-kind horse who lends to his kin a fierce tenacity, a will of iron, a look of eagles. Look & know that Slew is still very much with us."



  8. #48
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
    Location
    NorthEast
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    24,592

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    I also do not accept *any* bad behavior from any horse...ever. I will not tolerate an ill-behaved horse.
    However many people also misunderstand the differences between their pets. 99% of pets are dogs and/or cats. Small predators. With brains that think a whole lot differently than prey animals. While our dogs might not actually need to catch/hunt their food and most have absolutely no resemblence to their wild counter-parts....they do have the learning and pack mentality to learn commands and have them stick. Obeying humans has been bred into most.
    A prey animal is a whole 'nother animal. Add in herd animal too...a herd does not act, react or think like a pack of predators. A canine is ingrained to turn to it's alpha for instruction when afraid. A prey animal is hard wired to run like hell or kick when afraid...regardless of what the herd alpha is doing or telling it to do. The alpha of a herd rules in good times...where to eat, where to go, what order to eat in, etc. In bad times/predator attacks they run. Despite Hollywood protrayal a horse herd does not gallop majestically away with a herd stallion or even the alpha mare leading the way. They can scatter or stay together...but it's every horse for itself. That's how Mother Nature made them...survival of the fastest.
    People have very little success training a horse to tolerate a dog if the horse hates dogs. You can accustom a horse to having dogs around but if something spooks the horse or the horse gets pissed off...the horse will bolt or kick no matter what you taught it. (not under saddle but when loose)
    You jump in the saddle,
    Hold onto the bridle!
    Jump in the line!
    ...Belefonte



  9. #49
    Join Date
    Aug. 22, 2000
    Location
    CT
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    2,458

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    I boarded at a "dog friendly" barn for a while. It was great to be able to bring my young Aussie with me. But problems did occur as people let their dogs loose (mine was not loose unless I was supervising him) and they started running through the barn, chasing each other and scaring the horses on the crossties and some even chased the horses in the field. My horse was quite good about them, but there was no way to get used to suddenly having tow or three dogs charging up behind you. Startled both of us!
    At the next barn there were only a couple of boarders. I would bring my dog, mainly to have some bonding time during the 30 minute drive each way. He would come on weeknights and wait in the car (he was quiet and could see me in the ring) After riding I could let him out and take him for a run in the fields (horses were in).
    Third stable also started out with only two boarders. It was secluded enough that I could let the dog loose while I groomed. He was a mama's boy and always stayed in sight. If anyone else was around or when I rode, he would be tied. (Except when some of the lesson kids were around and wanted to throw the frisbee for him... they had fun and he got exercise!) I had tie spots by the ring and the grooming areas. After riding in the ring I would often ride down the trail to cool out. Then he got to be off leash and come with us. By this time horse and dog knew each other and my horse got used to the dog by his feet and rustling around in the woods. The only difficulty was that the dog liked to be in front and I would have to click to him too to move on if we were trotting!
    Eventually the BO got dogs and mine stayed home. He did not always play well with other dogs and nobody needed to worry about the interactions. Eventually I had to speak to the BO about her dogs as they were young and would try to chase the horse while I was riding and she was in the house. Eventually they were restricted to the house area. It is amazing how some horse-related people can be rude about their dogs. Had a vet with a JT that would come and be in the way and then growl at the barn dogs! Similar problem with a farrier. Happily, the trainer does keep close tabs on her dog.
    In the future I would like a barn that allows dogs under limited circumstances ( ie one that enforces rules so the dogs are not annoying or dangerous) but I would not want a barn where the boarders (or owners, trainers, etc)are allowed to let their dogs run rampant and create problems!



  10. #50
    Join Date
    Nov. 9, 2005
    Location
    uk
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    15,278

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    Quote Originally Posted by TwoArabs View Post
    Just on of my observations. People who have small dogs such as JRTs are usually not as adamant about traing as those of us wiyh larger more poweful breeds. Around horses any dog, regardless of size can be dangerous.
    wrong----- a dog is a dog - i have always had jrts and big dogs such as gsd and xbreeds of gsdx collie or collie xdoberman types

    patch my small dog is a jrt cleo his predecessor was a jrtx lakeland looked like a jrt as smaller verison

    its not the dogs that need educating it the owners of how they teach there dogs
    mine are all obediant they do not bark continiously as i dont like it, i want sleep my neighbours want sleep as we all work, my dog p and pooh in the dump in the garden or up the yard they are not allowed to p or pooh outside on the road streets or anywhere else i do not want to have to pick up dog pooh- they can control it --

    my dog have always healed when out, n off lead always come back to call they do not mix with other dogs as i only take them up the stables or around the block

    and ll my dog have been freindly and not aggressive that is unless you mena me harm or oneof my fmaily members the dogs stay on the floor, where they belong , and when playing with the dogs i never ever let them, go behind me-- as that dominance in a dogs mind and thats when they lose it.. think about it



  11. #51
    Join Date
    Jun. 18, 2007
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    4,173

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    Should always be on a leash attached to a person - unless you can demonstrate training like my trainer does. (She, by the way, hates other people's dogs running loose at her facility and getting into things.) Her dogs are trained absolutely. I saw her once feeding her dogs. She put all three of them in a "huddle" in a down stay while she mixed up three bowls. She put the three bowls out some distance away, separated, and then released Dog #1 and told him which bowl to go to. Dog #1 went to that bowl; nobody else moved. Released Dog #2 after a delay and told him his bowl, then released Dog #3 a minute later. All of this by voice alone. No dog even thought of moving from that spot until that dog personally had the okay, no matter if there was food or other dogs were eating or what. Trained like that, yes, okay, but otherwise, on a leash at all times.

    I did have family members come through for a short visit of a few hours a year ago, and they impressed me to pieces. Pulled up, and the first thing I noticed is that there were dogs in the car (1 standard poodle, 2 beagles). They know I have cats. They apologized for bringing the dogs; last-minute kennel issue prevented leaving them. They then, while one walked the dogs leashed, got out the crates they had brought with them from the back of the truck. Assembled crates in shade, inserted dogs, added water. At no point was any dog loose or any cat or critter of mine (or possession) harassed. They even added a "shut up" when the crated dogs started yapping - and the dogs did shut up.

    Now guests like THAT are welcome to bring their dogs to my farm. Unfortunately, most people don't have the trained dogs of the first instance above or the consideration of the second instance.



  12. #52
    Join Date
    Nov. 1, 2006
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    874

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    Quote Originally Posted by sisu27 View Post
    I have a HUGE Dobe that goes everywhere that I go whenever possible. I don't see how you can have a dog that is larger than a squirrel and deny them the extreme joy they get from car rides, the cottage, the beach, the barn, horse shows... My dog needs to run....If my dog is in a dog friendly setting and off leash and minding his own business...shut up about it.
    Charming attitude. Why are we supposed to care about the needs of a dog you purchased if you apparently didn't care about those needs enough to have a legitimate way to meet them? Finding a quiet park and unsnapping the lead is not the way to exercise a dog. I don't see how you can own and love a dog and be so deeply callous to other people. Public places like parks and beaches and trails are maintained for people - some of whom do not like dogs, some of whom are terrified of dogs, some of whom are simply not interested in meeting your dog, and none of whom know your dog. The appropriate place to take your dog offleash is the public place maintained for dogs - the dog park.

    About the whole 'shut up' thing? Fat chance. If your dog is offleash, you're going to get an earful. I've seen and experienced too many ugly dog incidents to have any illusions that a loose dog isn't a problem if he's 'minding his own business.' Or to have any faith in any owner's ability to read their own dog, for that matter.

    Quote Originally Posted by TwoArabs View Post
    Just on of my observations. People who have small dogs such as JRTs are usually not as adamant about traing as those of us wiyh larger more poweful breeds. Around horses any dog, regardless of size can be dangerous.
    Small dogs, particularly terriers, are often highly wired and expressive. Large dogs, particularly guard and 'fighting' breeds, are often very stolid and quiet. I find this creates the impression that many small dogs are badly trained, badly behaved brats, while many large dogs are well-trained, well behaved gentlemen. I think it's a misconception. The large dog isn't neccessarily trained or good natured, it's just quiet. Being 'just quiet' myself, I can testify that low reactivity is not in itself a sign of either good temperment or good manners.



  13. #53
    Join Date
    Sep. 25, 2007
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    TN
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    I did not mean the appearance of training, I meant actual training. It is imperative for large dog like my rottie to be trained within an inch of his life. Small untrained dogs, while still dangerous cannot do the danage a large one can do. Responsible owners recognize this and train their dogs. I also have a JRT, and although trained, not nearly as well as the rottie..



  14. #54
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    Jan. 17, 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by riverbell93 View Post
    Charming attitude. Why are we supposed to care about the needs of a dog you purchased if you apparently didn't care about those needs enough to have a legitimate way to meet them? Finding a quiet park and unsnapping the lead is not the way to exercise a dog. I don't see how you can own and love a dog and be so deeply callous to other people. Public places like parks and beaches and trails are maintained for people - some of whom do not like dogs, some of whom are terrified of dogs, some of whom are simply not interested in meeting your dog, and none of whom know your dog. The appropriate place to take your dog offleash is the public place maintained for dogs - the dog park.

    About the whole 'shut up' thing? Fat chance. If your dog is offleash, you're going to get an earful. I've seen and experienced too many ugly dog incidents to have any illusions that a loose dog isn't a problem if he's 'minding his own business.' Or to have any faith in any owner's ability to read their own dog, for that matter.



    Small dogs, particularly terriers, are often highly wired and expressive. Large dogs, particularly guard and 'fighting' breeds, are often very stolid and quiet. I find this creates the impression that many small dogs are badly trained, badly behaved brats, while many large dogs are well-trained, well behaved gentlemen. I think it's a misconception. The large dog isn't neccessarily trained or good natured, it's just quiet. Being 'just quiet' myself, I can testify that low reactivity is not in itself a sign of either good temperment or good manners.
    I didn't ask for anyone to care, just leave us alone. We are not interacting with you so don't interact with us. That means your ill-mannered children as well. The dog that I "purchased", also known as rescued, has all his needs met and then some. Not sure how you came to the conclussion that he is somehow neglected. I don't take him into a highly populated public place and release him to go molest and terrify people. I also don't take him anywhere that dogs are not allowed to go.

    You are clearly not the quiet type if you will go out of your way to give me an "earful" because I am doing something that is not hurting you and perfectly legal. I get that some people just hate dogs, some people hate "fighting" breeds (whatever that includes) and some people just like confrontation. Whatever. Don't be surprised though when I make up for my canine companions lack of bark and bite.
    "look deep into his pedigree. Look for the name of a one-of-a-kind horse who lends to his kin a fierce tenacity, a will of iron, a look of eagles. Look & know that Slew is still very much with us."



  15. #55
    Join Date
    Aug. 11, 2003
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    3,589

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    An interesting statistic "99% of dog bites are from dogs who have never bitten before". I get so tired of people saying "oh, my dog would never bite" - yes, not so far.

    Don't get me wrong, I love dogs, have always had them. I have a big GSD mutt cross and a border collie. (I also have horses and cattle) They run free on MY farm and I do everything in my power to stop them getting out. They are NEVER off the leash anywhere else because personally, I worry when I see dogs off the leash and do not want to make other people feel that way.

    A 1 strike rule, is 1 strike too many as far as I am concerned. I can guarantee that if one of my dogs bit or threatened anyone it would be the last breath that they took.

    Brookes - I am very sorry that you have been injured by some inconsiderate twit, who should never have owned an animal in the 1st place.



  16. #56
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    Jul. 11, 2004
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    "I don't see how you can have a dog...deny them the extreme joy they get from car rides, the cottage, the beach, the barn, horse shows... My dog needs to run....If my dog is in a dog friendly setting and off leash and minding his own business...shut up about it.... didn't ask for anyone to care, just leave us alone...I don't take him into a highly populated public place and release him to go molest and terrify people. I also don't take him anywhere that dogs are not allowed to go."

    Phewee! Got some issues?

    People/horses/cats/dogs attacked by dogs...pretty common.
    People/cats/dogs attacked by horses...very very uncommon.

    Nobody cares if YOUR dog is happy or running loose with extreme joy. They care about their horse, their kid, their barn cat and their controlled & leashed animal. A barn is not dog-friendly, most beaches are not dog-friendly, horse shows are absolutely no bloody place for a dog (especially a dobie, a breed with a high prey drive). You're the only own who gives a flip about your dog...to the rest of the world, he's potentially dangerous and encroaching
    on their "happiness and extreme joy"...sounds like you're too selfish to care, but demand they worry about you.

    [edit]
    Last edited by Moderator 1; Jul. 28, 2008 at 02:04 PM. Reason: personal commentary



  17. #57
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    Mar. 4, 2006
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    VA/MD
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    640

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kate66 View Post
    They run free on MY farm and I do everything in my power to stop them getting out. They are NEVER off the leash anywhere else because personally, I worry when I see dogs off the leash and do not want to make other people feel that way.

    Thank you - you are what I think is a wonderful example of a considerate dog owner!
    I wish that's what a few other dog owners would realize...that the sight of a loose dog makes some people nervous (especially throwing a horse into the mix), regardless of what the owner believes they can trust about their dog.
    "To understand the soul of a horse is the closest human beings can come to knowing perfection."



  18. #58
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    Sep. 17, 2003
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    AridZona
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    If my dog is in a dog friendly setting and off leash and minding his own business...shut up about it.
    I think it's all in her definition of dog friendly. If it's a dog park or an area designated specifically for off leash dogs, then yay! Go to town as long as your dog isn't aggressive towards other animals or people. OTOH, if it's defined as 'Yay! Open spaces! Be free!" then no. I don't think the OP specified, so perhaps people are being a little harsh at this point?
    Delicious strawberry flavored death!



  19. #59
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    May. 5, 2002
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    1,713

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    Quote Originally Posted by Trakehner View Post
    I love dogs...despise them at the barn. Barn = Horses, Kennel = Dogs.

    -Hate having my stuff peed on.
    -Scraping dog crap off my boots.
    -A dog jumping up on me.
    -Dogs spooking the horses.
    -Idiot owners locking their dogs in a stall while we hear their incessant barking and lungeing as we walk our horse down the aisle.

    For dog owners who just HAVE to have your dog everywhere with you: You can survive without little Fluffy with you, we don't like your dog, we don't find him cute or adorable, his "quirks" aren't endearing, he's not as well trained as you think he is, just because we have horses doesn't mean we like your dog, when he growls at us we'd prefer kicking him across the ring. It's a dog...not a child or your cosmic partner. You pay for your horses board, not a kennel. We pay for our horses board, not to put up with your bloody mutt...this isn't "doggie day care". We can get hurt because of your selfishness and basic stupidity...if your dog chases my horse/kid/friend, I'll kill it, right now with whatever is at hand to protect them...you dog will always lose.

    Of course, a lot of these comments are applicable to parents..(well, breeders actually, parents watch their kids)...who bring their untrained brats to the barn and expect the adults to watch them while they ride.
    THAT is exactly how I feel. You said it so much better than me.



  20. #60
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    Nov. 1, 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by sisu27 View Post
    I didn't ask for anyone to care, just leave us alone. We are not interacting with you so don't interact with us. That means your ill-mannered children as well. The dog that I "purchased", also known as rescued, has all his needs met and then some. Not sure how you came to the conclussion that he is somehow neglected. I don't take him into a highly populated public place and release him to go molest and terrify people. I also don't take him anywhere that dogs are not allowed to go.

    You are clearly not the quiet type if you will go out of your way to give me an "earful" because I am doing something that is not hurting you and perfectly legal. I get that some people just hate dogs, some people hate "fighting" breeds (whatever that includes) and some people just like confrontation. Whatever. Don't be surprised though when I make up for my canine companions lack of bark and bite.
    I didn't imply he was neglected, I implied you were obnoxious to make his exercise needs the responsibility of your community rather than something you should have thought of before you acquired him. In regards to legality, we may be at cross-purposes here. Where I'm from, there are laws against letting dogs, particularly large dogs, loose in public spaces. Perhaps you live in a more remote area which lacks any restrictions of this sort. And I am the quiet type - I believe in live and let live as long as what you're doing doesn't hurt me. I've had far too many loose dogs hurt me and mine to swallow the argument that you having your dog roaming offleash is not going to hurt me.



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