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  1. #1
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    Default What's fast?

    Is galloping four furlongs in :50 flat considered fast?



  2. #2
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    Default

    Racing or working?



  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drvmb1ggl3 View Post
    Racing or working?
    workout...



  4. #4
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    Default

    The time would be average for a workout, not particularly fast or slow. It would all depend on how the horse went, i.e in hand, asked, wherabouts on the track, from the gate etc etc etc.



  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drvmb1ggl3 View Post
    The time would be average for a workout, not particularly fast or slow. It would all depend on how the horse went, i.e in hand, asked, wherabouts on the track, from the gate etc etc etc.
    What would be considered fast? What would the number have to be to be like "Wow, this horse is fast"? If all other things went well - he broke well..etc.



  6. #6
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    Jul. 2, 1999
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    Default

    Not overly so. For example my neighbor's 3-yr old claimer filly on an all-weather track worked out 4F in 0:46.40 on a fast track on May 2nd since then she's put in works (at the same distance and track) at 0:51.80 and 0:52.20



  7. #7
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    Default

    Sorry for the questions... I'm a Newbie... So that's an average workout then for most? How do you workout to see if a horse is faster than average? Do you go a farther distance?



  8. #8
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hessy35 View Post
    Sorry for the questions... I'm a Newbie... So that's an average workout then for most? How do you workout to see if a horse is faster than average? Do you go a farther distance?
    You need to see how much the horse is blowing when it returns. I'll take a 50.00 flat breeze with a horse who comes back barely sweating and blowing over a 47.00 flat and the horse is sweaty and drinks a bucket of water.



  9. #9
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    Jul. 19, 2007
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    Default

    Well, don't be sorry for asking questions. They're good questions.

    A lot depends on the track surface and its condition at the time of the work. 50 flat is very respectable but not eye-popping. 46.4 is eye popping. Where I run, :48 and change will usually get you the fastest work of the day and you will generally see the half worked between :48 and :53.

    To really gauge a horse's ability, it's worked with another horse whose class (ability) is known.

    A fast work makes everyone feel good, but it's only part of the equation. Some horses can work fast but don't run well (I have one like that now). Others are slow in the morning and come alive at racetime. If you have a horse that consistently has poor works it is a bad sign and conversely, one that consistently has good works usually has some ability.



  10. #10
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    Jun. 30, 2006
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    Default

    In addition to needing to know the conditions of the work and the track, you also often have to take trainer patterns into consideration. Some trainers blow their horses out every time, others are more conservative in their approach.

    For example, many horses in Asmussen's strings notoriously work on the slow side... which is not necessarily indicative of their performance in the afternoon. Curlin's most frequent work was 4 furlongs in :50 4/5 on the dirt... absolutely nothing special there looking at time alone. Yet we all know what he's capable of in the afternoon.

    A good rule of thumb is 12 seconds per furlong. Obviously, a horse is going to be running a furlong slower when going a mile as opposed to working 3 furlongs... but it can give you somewhere to start when learning to gauge working times.
    Don't fall for a girl who fell for a horse just to be number two in her world... ~EFO



  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by SleepyFox View Post

    A fast work makes everyone feel good, but it's only part of the equation. Some horses can work fast but don't run well (I have one like that now). Others are slow in the morning and come alive at racetime. If you have a horse that consistently has poor works it is a bad sign and conversely, one that consistently has good works usually has some ability.
    Yeah. I had a sprinter working 35 flat and had a 47 and ran next to last. Conversely, a horse we claimed was less than stellar with a 51 and won on the raise. Workouts don't really mean much except to possibly see if a young one has some ability.



  12. #12
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    Default

    So it all comes down to race day then? .... How do you know what distance to run your horse in?



  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Texarkana View Post
    In addition to needing to know the conditions of the work and the track, you also often have to take trainer patterns into consideration. Some trainers blow their horses out every time, others are more conservative in their approach.
    Indeed a lot of mind games are played with workouts. Intentionally slow ones to ensure (perhaps) better odds the day of the race. Wicked fast works to perhaps inspire a claim of a horse that someone would be happy to part with.

    Works also - unlike races - don't reflect the weight of the rider. So you easily could have a 20% (or much more) spread in weights between X and Y horse worked at the same time, same track, same distance ....



  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by hessy35 View Post
    So it all comes down to race day then? .... How do you know what distance to run your horse in?
    A published work is just a number on paper. Unless you witness the work, and even know a little bit about the horse, then it's hard to know what to make of it.

    As to what distance, the horse will let you know, if of course you're listening that is.
    It's not like you're going to be spoiled for options anyway regards to distance, probably over 90-95% of all races in the US are under 8.5f, so it's either sprinting or routing, with the former making up the majority (around 80%?).
    Sprinting -- 5f, 5.5f, 6f or 6.5f, maybe the odd 4.5f. Some tracks have 7f races, if the configuration allows.
    Routing -- 1m, 1m 1/16 (sometimes you see 1m40yds and 1m70yds, which are basically 1m races, just that the track config doesn't make 1m safe/feasable so they push the start gate back a either 40 or 70yds).
    You'll see the odd 9f race, usually at the "classier" tracks, and about the only horses that go 10f are horses in Graded races. Races longer than that are like hen's teeth, even on grass.



  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drvmb1ggl3 View Post
    A published work is just a number on paper. Unless you witness the work, and even know a little bit about the horse, then it's hard to know what to make of it.

    As to what distance, the horse will let you know, if of course you're listening that is.
    It's not like you're going to be spoiled for options anyway regards to distance, probably over 90-95% of all races in the US are under 8.5f, so it's either sprinting or routing, with the former making up the majority (around 80%?).
    Sprinting -- 5f, 5.5f, 6f or 6.5f, maybe the odd 4.5f. Some tracks have 7f races, if the configuration allows.
    Routing -- 1m, 1m 1/16 (sometimes you see 1m40yds and 1m70yds, which are basically 1m races, just that the track config doesn't make 1m safe/feasable so they push the start gate back a either 40 or 70yds).
    You'll see the odd 9f race, usually at the "classier" tracks, and about the only horses that go 10f are horses in Graded races. Races longer than that are like hen's teeth, even on grass.
    I'm so impressed... but still a little confused. Almost seems like a crap shot... One never really knows and just prays a lot for the best outcome. You'd think the training would put you where you want to be.. but then there seems to be so much doubt about what a horse really can do. So yes, it all comes down to race day, which is why this sport is so exciting. It's all about chance and brilliance... hopefully you get both on the same day... race day.



  16. #16
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    Feb. 13, 2007
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    Default

    Also pedigree will play a part...Horses from sprinters, turf horses, distance horses, etc.

    I bought a lovely filly that was bred to go long on the grass... former owner ran her twice sprinting on the dirt.. she had 2 bad finishes on the dirt, I ran her back on the grass and she won easily.

    We always teach our babies how to rate in the morning works... put them behind another set working, etc... Working them together 5/8ths of a mile and letting them gallop out 3/4...usually you can get a good idea who likes to sprint and is fast, and who likes to come off the pace and gets better the farther they run.



  17. #17
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    Exclamation twelves

    As a "rule of thumb , "consider" twelves' 12seconds/furlong as a pretty fast clip
    breeder of Mercury!

    remember to enjoy the moment, and take a moment to enjoy and give God the glory for these wonderful horses in our lives.BECAUSE: LIFE is What Happens While Making Other Plans



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