The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 33
  1. #1
    Join Date
    May. 29, 2007
    Location
    Area III
    Posts
    122

    Question Eventing & College

    I'm currently deciding which college I would like to attend and I would like to hear input from current college students who also event. How do you make time for both? I'm not really the partying type; I plan to focus on my education and my riding; but I'd like to hear from current students about how they stay on top of their assignments and still make time for riding. Any kind of tips or experiences would be appreciated.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul. 13, 2006
    Posts
    2,445

    Default

    Well I am not a current student (graduated fall of '03) but I did keep 2 horses throughout and competed heavily all over the country when I was in school. Basically the college I went to was about an hour and 15 minutes from my barn. I lived with my sister 20 minutes from school Mon-Thurs, and then drove straight home after class Thursday and stayed through Sunday. I was able to still ride 4 days a week, the boys didn't work Monday anyway, and my trainer would have people hack and do the fitness work on Tues and Weds. Being on the semester system is easier for missing classes then quarters as you can miss more days without it effecting your grades. I am not a partier, I don't drink, go dancing, or basically do anything. I was able to arrange my classes in such a way that I would go Tues/Thurs from 7-2, and then a night class on Mon & Weds, which means all homework was done Monday and Wednesday morning so didn't even have to take it home with me. When I was getting ready for some of the bigger shows I would also drive back and forth on Wednesday morning to ride as well. While in college I competed 1 horse at advanced doing 2 ***'s and then Rolex, as well as had a training/prelim baby. Also I am in CA so made at least 1-2 big trips back east, along with doing all the western states driving (all over CA, AZ, NM, CO, NV, UT) to keep them tuned and going each year. It is very duable, you just have to want to do it. Also I'm one of those annoying people that finds school quite simple, so didn't have to put much effort in either so that did help immensely. I graduated in 4 1/2 years with a major in Communications, and a minor in Business Admin being just 3 classes away from a double major.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun. 12, 2008
    Posts
    146

    Default

    I'm no longer a current student - but I was a member of my school's equestrian team and had my horse at school with me for my four years of undergrad (I graduated in 2005). I managed to ride 4-5 days a week (~1 show a month), work as an RA, maintain good grades, and have a life. It's all about time management - you'll hear that over and over again, but it's so true! I scheduled blocks of time into my schedule for classes, riding, homework, etc..., and I stuck fairly closely to that schedule. I always planned for three hours of homework per hour of class, and I just didn't go to the barn if I had a big paper due or was in the middle of finals. My riding suffered a little bit, but all in all, I was able to make it work! If you're serious about making everything work, then you'll be fine! Good luck - you'll have a blast



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan. 7, 2005
    Location
    Southern Ohio
    Posts
    974

    Default

    Well im in college at the moment. (I'm 20)
    I commute to school. I try to just go 2 days a week and have enough time left in the day to either ride before or after school. This semester I have class 2 days and then i go another evening. I can really only take 12/13 credit hours at a time, which is frustrating because I don't like school and just want to be done. But I can't afford to not work.
    I work at 2.5 jobs also... I work off part of my board, I work at a little boutique selling makeup and clothes and I also work at a restraught(that I had worked at for 4 years prior to the job i have now) when they need me, if i'm not already scheduled to work some place else.
    I pay for everything horse related (shoes, board, shows, chiro. vet etc) as well as everything to do with my car.

    From about March to November I don't get to hardly see my friends. Last summer I took a summer class, was working doubles at the restraungt (like how i can't spell that? haha) I started training for the job I had now, moved up to prelim with my TB, and from the middle of may until the middle of July I was at a horse show (either showing, grooming, or helping out) every weekend.

    Time management. Understanding friends who will let you fall asleep on their shoulder when you finally get to see them, and hard work.

    It can be done! I wish I could go away to school, but for me its not an option.
    Oh. and
    I am a bit of a partier, but only in the winter months.
    -Chelsie
    "Hell yes I can ride. I was riding when I fell off!"



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct. 20, 2008
    Posts
    76

    Default

    Its quite doable, in some ways easier than when I was in high school, in some ways harder ( the $$$ issue, college isnt cheap and this economy isnt helping). College is nice because everything is consolidated so to speak, classes are just lecture, not useless busy work. I am taking 17 hours this semester, and it has not been a problem. i have less of a social life than i did in high school actually. I would recommend scheduling all of your classes early in the morning (I finish by 11 on m-w-f) so that you can leave for shows with out missing classes. Last semester I did Pine Top, Paradise, and the Ocala Nov CCI*, and I only had to miss 3 days (for Ocala). This semester I have done/ plan to do the Poplar Jan, Poplar Feb, Red Hills, Poplar March, Chatt Hills April, and Chat Hills Championships. Honestly, I would be able to handle showing more than that, if I had the funding.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    May. 29, 2007
    Location
    Area III
    Posts
    122

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mkmallory View Post
    Its quite doable, in some ways easier than when I was in high school, in some ways harder ( the $$$ issue, college isnt cheap and this economy isnt helping). College is nice because everything is consolidated so to speak, classes are just lecture, not useless busy work. I am taking 17 hours this semester, and it has not been a problem. i have less of a social life than i did in high school actually. I would recommend scheduling all of your classes early in the morning (I finish by 11 on m-w-f) so that you can leave for shows with out missing classes. Last semester I did Pine Top, Paradise, and the Ocala Nov CCI*, and I only had to miss 3 days (for Ocala). This semester I have done/ plan to do the Poplar Jan, Poplar Feb, Red Hills, Poplar March, Chatt Hills April, and Chat Hills Championships. Honestly, I would be able to handle showing more than that, if I had the funding.
    Thanks so much! This is what I've been wanting to hear! I was considering morning classes, and this definitely helped me make up my mind. Juggling horses and high school has been quite a task for me, so I was very concerned about how college and riding would be. I'm currently at the Preliminary level and right now my biggest concern is finding a trainer, but I am glad to hear that competing and college can be done!



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan. 8, 2008
    Location
    Amherst, MA
    Posts
    84

    Default First Hand

    As director of a college program I see students that ride in a program, come with their own horse and board and then some that even travel back an forth on the weekends. ALL IS DOABLE! Given the right attitude and commitment to your studies and your horse.
    Good luck, riding is actually a constructive outlet to your studies and, for many, forces a stricted schedule between both.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2005
    Location
    between the mountains and the sea, North Carolina
    Posts
    2,936

    Default

    While I agree that it's definitely DOABLE to own a horse & event while in college, it may not be an ideal situation for everyone. I had my mare my first year and a half at college, and then sold her. Yes, I miss going to the barn every day and riding. And I miss her. But I'm gaining so much life experience not having the constraints of being responsible for a horse. There's a lot more to the world than riding and competing, and university is the perfect time to try new activities and meet new people. Through University I've discovered two new passions - rugby and hillwalking. I wouldn't have tried either if I'd been out competing every weekend. Just some food for thought...
    "Choose to chance the rapids, and dare to dance the tides" - Garth Brooks
    "With your permission, dear, I'll take my fences one at a time" - Maggie Smith, Downton Abbey



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec. 2, 2008
    Posts
    41

    Default

    I'm in college and ride 10x as much as I did in high school! I also volunteer at various places and have ...an inkling of a social life. But the latter is because I don't try very hard. Schedule your classes as early as possible, try not to have huge breaks in between so you can be done early afternoon. Your first semester, don't overwhelm yourself. I did 14 out of 18 credits, most of which were very easy, so I could "feel" everything out.

    However, I am quite willing to have horses be my entire life! Definitely not for everyone who wants to experience "new things" in college.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct. 22, 2008
    Location
    The part of VA far from everything
    Posts
    114

    Default

    I managed to get a biochemistry degree and take my mare from Novice to the CCI* level in my 4 years at college, so its completely doable! I graduated May of 2008 from a school right outside Baltimore, my horse lived about 35 minutes away. I drove to the barn at least 6 days a week and competed heavily. I worked at the barn to pay board and worked in the school's chemistry department to pay for the farrier and events. Lets just say I was never bored.

    I "partied" a little bit I guess, but my roommates learned pretty quickly to leave me alone on weeekends I was competing!

    My college had an equestrian team, but if you are truly and eventer it really isn't the same type of riding. If you like to do both types though, go for it. My school wasn't really a horsey college but I was smack in the middle of Area II. I found myself scheduling classes in blocks so I would have time to make the 2 1/2 hour trip it took to go and ride pretty much everyday. I still has time to study every night (when I could convince myself to).

    Take advantage of the awesome situation you will find yourself in, because at this point I wish I could go back!



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2008
    Posts
    13

    Default

    It is all about time management. I am currently in college and I am able to ride and do well in school. You just need to come up with a schedule that works for you. Like either schedule your classes in the morning or afternoon so you have time to ride. I like to get my classes done in the morning so I can go to the barn in the afternoon and ride. I am able to take lessons during the week too. Riding in college is very doable you just need to make it work.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul. 3, 2007
    Posts
    538

    Default

    While it's not easy, it is very doable. I am currently a second year at Cal Poly in San Luis Obispo, CA and ride with Gina Miles, who is also a Cal Poly alumna herself. Despite riding quite a bit (2-3 horses 5 days a week) with 18-22 hours of class a quarter in a science major, I have still been able to fit in 1-2 events per quarter and remain on the Dean's list (3.5+ GPA) thus far. Granted, I only "go out" to party about 2-3 times a quarter, so there are some sacrifices to be made, though they are totally worth it.

    I also wanted to add that the days (usually only 2-4) you miss for events is usually less than most students who just don't feel like going to class somedays.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct. 25, 2008
    Location
    Coastal SC
    Posts
    472

    Default

    I graduated from college last year and actually spent the first 3 years horseless. By the time college came around I was tired of competing and spending all my money (i worked 3 jobs in high school to support the habit) on riding. So I went to college and leased my horse out to a pony clubber and completely enjoyed 3 years of selfishness. Then my 4th year I was dying to ride again but couldn't take my horse away from leasee, so I sold him to her and bought a project. Moved him up to school and trained him myself out of a friends barn. I was in nursing school at Clemson and had 8 hour clinicals in greenville 3 days a week by my 5th year but the other 4 days I usually spent at the barn. I only competed once while in college, but training an OTTB took up plenty of time which was why i did that: I wasn't ready to compete after 3 years off and my leased horse was. Great solution. I saw you were from area III and there are a lot of schools near great events. Clemson has tons of farms around to board at and while I was there we started an eventing team, as the equestrian team is not the same!! They are working on being collegiate recognized so that was a great thing to be a part of while in school!! Good luck, its doable if you have some financial resources!



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug. 4, 2008
    Location
    On a horse's back.
    Posts
    489

    Default

    Before I went to my current college, I was taking 20 credit hours a semester, working 15 hours as a Biology and Chemistry tutor, and riding and showing horses consistently. I was also training horses. I made a 4.0 at that college. Then I transferred into a public ivy league school (entering average freshman GPA is a 4.44...crazy, I know) as a science major, and that quickly changed. I have to work my butt off and only am making a 3.62 cumulative GPA (combined from both colleges) so far. The transfer shock got me the first semester, but I brought my GPA up the second semester and it has been uphill since then. It is soooo much harder than my other college, but I want to get both a PhD and a DVM so it is worth it. This college will hold a lot more weight than a lot of others when applying to grad school, and I really wanted to come here since it is almost impossible to get in. My boyfriend is a doctor, and he says that I am actually doing graduate level work instead of undergraduate level work And I still ride and show, but I cannot show nearly as much. Forget having a social life. My horses are my social life right now. So, it depends on which school you go to and what your major is when it comes to how much time you have to ride.

    Another option for you would be to double major as an equestrian science major and another major of your choice. Averett University has a nice eventing track major equestrian program. It also has a dressage track major and a management major. I should have gone to school there! For example, you could double major as an equestrian management track science major and as a Biology major at Averett. I only know of this college that offers eventing programs, but I'm sure there are other colleges that offer nice eventing programs as well.

    I may be taking a friend's horse all the way to Grand Prix show jumping this year because she is restricted to dressage until her arm heals from a surgery gone wrong. The doctors said that it may take up to 5 years for her to get feeling fully back into the arm, but we're hoping it will heal a lot faster than that! I need my show buddy back! It is possible to still have your time in the saddle even if you go to a college like the one that I go to. I also volunteer with the 4-H Horse Program as much as I can now.

    It was useless for me to join the hunter equestrian team at my college because they don't jump nearly as high as I would like and I'd rather spend the money on my own horses. I have two at home that need to be ridden and fed.

    If horses truly are your life, you won't have to discover the university life. It really is hyped up, and should be viewed as work and not play. Of course, I am 23 and I never really partied. I took a few years off from before going to college to show and ride horses. Then I spent 2 1/2 years at my previous college, and will spend 2 1/2 years at Carolina. You must be very disciplined in your studies and your horses if you want to succeed in both worlds. My goal is to learn everything about them that I can (hence the PhD and DVM aspirations). I also want my horses to compete internationally (even if I'm not riding them) one day and have a boarding facility (hence the PhD and DVM so that I can afford everything!!!).

    I'm a Biology major and a Chemistry minor.

    I hope this helped and good luck! If you have any more questions feel free to PM me.
    Last edited by Filly85'; Jan. 30, 2009 at 01:39 AM.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 2007
    Location
    Philthadelphia
    Posts
    102

    Default

    I'm currently a college student and have a horse with me. I competed a lot my freshman and sophmore years then sold my Prelim horse a bought a young'n. I had a very hard time keeping the Prelim guy on his conditioning schedule with school but with a young horse who doesn't need such consistent work I have had no trouble fitting in riding. I also am a part time WS for an UL rider and I work at the barn in the AM before class several days a week. This semester I only have class on tues/thurs and Monday eve so I can work and ride during the day on MWF and still have another part time job to bring in extra cash. I have little time for a social life anymore but I'm a senior so I don't really care. I did make time to socialize in the earlier days when classes were easier, however, and it wasn't a problem at all. That was never a big priority to me anyway. I chose my school because it's close to a lot of events and good trainers (and it's a pretty good school too, produced our lovely new VP ).

    I think it also sort of depends what your financial situation is. If my parents were supporting my riding still and I didn't have to have 2 jobs it would be a totally different story. I'd have all the time in the world and I'd get a heck of a lot more sleep haha!

    You definitely have to be dedicated to make it work. Since I've been in college I'm even more sure than I ever was that I want to do the horses full time when I get out. The opposite may happen for other people. You'll just have to see what works for you.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Sep. 1, 2008
    Posts
    60

    Default

    I am in college full time as a biochem major (4.0!), have had a job at a vet for a year working about 15 hours a week, and ride at prelim. Its very hard to keep it up especially keeping him fit for what hes doing, but it is doable. You just have to keep your priorities straight and it will be fine! Most of my friends go to UGA and its very hard telling them no I have to ride when there are big games and parties, but I do and I dont regret it! If you want to event and ride I would look at USC Aiken or even Augusta state university (where I go). They are very close to everything and even though they are small schools they have good reputations, and I don't regret going to ASU at all. I dont think I could have evented if I was at a school and had to travel to events, because most of the time that means missing classes.

    Also, I have a question to anyone in vet school or has gone to vet school. I am applying this october to get in the fall of 2010, and I was wondering about taking a horse with you. I have heard that there would be no way, but then again not riding for 4 years will be very difficult. I know competing at the UL is out of the picture, but has anyone been successful at vet school with a horse?



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jun. 2, 2008
    Posts
    139

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Filly85' View Post
    Before I went to my current college, I was taking 20 credit hours a semester, working 15 hours as a Biology and Chemistry tutor, and riding and showing horses consistently. I was also training horses. I made a 4.0 at that college. Then I transferred into a public ivy league school (entering average freshman GPA is a 4.44...crazy, I know) as a science major, and that quickly changed. I have to work my butt off and only am making a 3.62 cumulative GPA (combined from both colleges) so far. The transfer shock got me the first semester, but I brought my GPA up the second semester and it has been uphill since then. It is soooo much harder than my other college, but I want to get both a PhD and a DVM so it is worth it. This college will hold a lot more weight than a lot of others when applying to grad school, and I really wanted to come here since it is almost impossible to get in. My boyfriend is a doctor, and he says that I am actually doing graduate level work instead of undergraduate level work And I still ride and show, but I cannot show nearly as much. Forget having a social life. My horses are my social life right now. So, it depends on which school you go to and what your major is when it comes to how much time you have to ride.

    Another option for you would be to double major as an equestrian science major and another major of your choice. Averett University has a nice eventing track major equestrian program. It also has a dressage track major and a management major. I should have gone to school there! For example, you could double major as an equestrian management track science major and as a Biology major at Averett. I only know of this college that offers eventing programs, but I'm sure there are other colleges that offer nice eventing programs as well.

    I may be taking a friend's horse all the way to Grand Prix show jumping this year because she is restricted to dressage until her arm heals from a surgery gone wrong. The doctors said that it may take up to 5 years for her to get feeling fully back into the arm, but we're hoping it will heal a lot faster than that! I need my show buddy back! It is possible to still have your time in the saddle even if you go to a college like the one that I go to. I also volunteer with the 4-H Horse Program as much as I can now.

    It was useless for me to join the hunter equestrian team at my college because they don't jump nearly as high as I would like and I'd rather spend the money on my own horses. I have two at home that need to be ridden and fed.

    If horses truly are your life, you won't have to discover the university life. It really is hyped up, and should be viewed as work and not play. Of course, I am 23 and I never really partied. I took a few years off from before going to college to show and ride horses. Then I spent 2 1/2 years at my previous college, and will spend 2 1/2 years at Carolina. You must be very disciplined in your studies and your horses if you want to succeed in both worlds. My goal is to learn everything about them that I can (hence the PhD and DVM aspirations). I also want my horses to compete internationally (even if I'm not riding them) one day and have a boarding facility (hence the PhD and DVM so that I can afford everything!!!).

    I'm a Biology major and a Chemistry minor.

    I hope this helped and good luck! If you have any more questions feel free to PM me.
    This may be neither here nor there, but if you are in Carolina you are not at an Ivy League school. Only eight universities are included in the Ivy League and they're all in the Northeast. Of course many other universities are also excellent and you sound like a very accomplished and ambitious student.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Oct. 12, 2004
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    1,843

    Default

    Count me in with the voices who say it's doable but you have to be committed. I evented throughout undergrad, medical school and residency - usually a couple of horses and paid my way taking out major student loans and bartending. Yes, I'd do it all over again!



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Mar. 1, 2003
    Location
    Happily in Canada
    Posts
    4,709

    Default

    Another vote for do-able but need commitment.

    During undergrad, I helped pay for my horse by doing odd jobs and working off his board (amazing barn owner/manager was great about letting me work more in the early part of the term so I could have a week off during exams). I also barn-sat when the owner went on vacation, so it worked out really well. I did a CCI* the fall of my 2nd year and CCI** the fall of my 4th year (my grandmother helped me pay for the second trip).

    My GPA could have been higher if I'd applied myself more (or spent less time on COTH!). However I had no problem getting into law school (I did quite a few extra-curriculars on top of horses) and probably could have gotten into one of the 'big' schools if I'd cared to do that.

    I kept riding the first 2 years of law school and did a CCI* the fall of 1st year. It was a little dicey having taken 3 weeks off to do that (!) but it worked out. Again, without the horses my GPA might have been higher but I made a decision to continue with my riding, do some volunteering through the school, and also to get to know my peers and go out with them occasionally.

    I bought a green OTTB in the fall of 2nd year and the lifestyle didn't suit him (not enough turn-out and the riding facilities were too crowded). I'd always wanted to go on exchange so I decided that 9 months off in a big field would be good for him. He's currently living with the same BO I'd had in undergrad.

    I've been able to ride here (Scotland) but it's just not the same as having my own - the goals and responsibility are different, plus the commute can be a bit brutal! That's part of the reason I've decided to take more advantage of other activities (mountaineering, ceilidh dancing, international society) while I'm here.

    Like clivers, I'd do it all over again! Except maybe I would have kept my amazing pony instead of buying a needy 3 y.o. TB
    Blugal

    You never know what kind of obsessive compulsive crazy person you are until another person imitates your behaviour at a three-day. --Gry2Yng



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Aug. 4, 2008
    Location
    On a horse's back.
    Posts
    489

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tja789 View Post
    This may be neither here nor there, but if you are in Carolina you are not at an Ivy League school. Only eight universities are included in the Ivy League and they're all in the Northeast. Of course many other universities are also excellent and you sound like a very accomplished and ambitious student.
    It's considered a public ivy league school. Isn't that what I said? I didn't think that I said just "ivy league", but maybe I did. Oh well, some of our academic programs outdo some of those ivy league colleges anyway. I want to get my DVM from either Cornell or the U. of Penn. as well.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Public_Ivy
    Last edited by Filly85'; Jan. 31, 2009 at 03:00 PM.



Similar Threads

  1. The Perfect Eventing College Search Begins
    By MorganJumper848 in forum Eventing
    Replies: 33
    Last Post: Jul. 22, 2012, 10:05 AM
  2. Tell Me about your eventing friendly college
    By EventingMEF in forum Eventing
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: Aug. 21, 2010, 12:28 AM
  3. Drunk college students murder horse in College Station
    By cowgirljenn in forum Off Course
    Replies: 465
    Last Post: Jan. 14, 2009, 11:27 AM
  4. College and Eventing
    By TexasTB in forum Eventing
    Replies: 25
    Last Post: Sep. 11, 2008, 11:17 AM
  5. College Eventing Team
    By Bookish in forum Eventing
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: Aug. 1, 2008, 09:05 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •