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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2003
    Posts
    2,255

    Default horse friendly states: honest question

    I moved from Los Angeles to Oregon. The dressage scene in L.A. is off the charts magnificent but the 'living' situation for horses is less than stellar. And the costs are really outrageous.

    So here, in Oregon, where it's green year round, plentiful land for grazing and turnout, temperate weather, 'affordable' costs (hay can be $5 a bale to LA's $22 a bale for same quality). You can buy a huge horse farm here for what a little dirt postage stamp place goes for in CA. I was just wondering why the BNT and their horses aren't located in a more horse friendly territory. I figure the clients would follow them anywhere, and most have hella money anyway so don't need to work (no good jobs here) and the same for the backers.

    I'm guessing the same can be said for Florida? The big shows could move anywhere. The same judges work the shows here too.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2000
    Posts
    24,408

    Default

    I love Oregon.

    I think it works the other way around, usually. The big trainers go to where the big clients are.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep. 29, 2007
    Location
    Northern CA
    Posts
    1,616

    Default

    I think SLC is partly right - the trainers go where the money is. BUT - the other consideration is weather. You can ride and show all year around in LA or much of California or Florida. But in Oregon, as lovely as it is, the rainy season lasts and lasts - and lasts... Big show areas tend to be in the drier climates. Now, what came first, the chicken or the egg? Did the big money move to those areas because of the weather, and the shows followed the big money, and of course, the big trainers went where their livelihoods took them, or did the shows come to the climates that support showing year 'round, and the big money came next?

    Funny, my husband and I thought about relocating to Oregon too - because the land is gorgeous, the costs are low, the water supply is plentiful. But reality hit - there are no shows, no trainers, no market compared to California
    www.MysticOakRanch.com Friesian/Warmblood Crosses, the Ultimate Sporthorse
    Director, WTF Registry



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2005
    Location
    Northeast
    Posts
    10,203

    Wink

    Perhaps that's why a lot is centered in VA, PA, NJ. However the rally nice hunt country land is not inexpensive, and the Bnt's still head for FL come Nov. Dec, cause that's where the action and $$ are.

    The money always was in Palm Beach.
    Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb. 23, 2008
    Posts
    4,266

    Default

    I'm sure it's somewhat related to where high-paying jobs are. New York, the Capitol area, LA all have lots of jobs that pay lots of money. So the sheer numbers of people who can afford fine horses, big time shows, top trainers, etc. are concentrated around there. At least that's my impression. The areas north of NYC are full of horse farms large and small, and hundreds of people who take their whole barn down to Florida in the winter. That means there's lots of good vets and farriers, lots of trainers and boarding facilities, lots of local and regional shows as well as the bigger shows, and so on. That also means there's lots of services available to the regular folks who live in and around the area, although it also means some things, like land, tend to be quite expensive.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2003
    Posts
    2,255

    Default

    yes, it rains a LOT in Oregon but indoor arenas mean you can train fine all year. It rains in LA too and is very, very hot (and getting hotter) for quite a few months, whereas Oregon is more temperate.

    I generalize when I say most clients training with BNT are wealthy divorcees, kids flown from the nest, with lots of time and nothing really dictating where they live. Most would follow their trainer to the ends of the earth, or at least ship their horses off to the trainer's barn and fly in for lessons and shows.

    I thought about it more and could only come up with the fact that there would be no level of competition in Oregon unless all the others moved too. I guess they could ship back to LA for the show season? would that be feasible at all?

    FresianX, you are correct. No trainers, no shows, no market, not many jobs in Oregon compared w/ CA. But boy! It is like horse heaven here. Just not rider heaven



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr. 27, 2006
    Location
    Maben, MS
    Posts
    965

    Default

    Oregon can't be that bad - I live in Mississippi and there's nothing, nada, ziltch. Well, I guess if you have $$ you can travel a lot to trainers - I'm 3- 4.5 hours from dressage trainers.

    Most folks here do not know what dressage is, much less a warmblood sport horse.

    Guess that's why there are no BNT here or big shows. No market for it.

    Land is fairly inexpensive, lots of pastures. But horse flys that will carry you and your horse off and humidity that can be sliced with a knife



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul. 27, 2006
    Posts
    253

    Default

    I grew up riding in Chicago, and there is TONS to do, lots of nice barns around, all of which had waiting lists. I paid $600 for board at a fairly nice place 60 miles west of the city.

    Five years ago I moved to Wisconsin for a job (which is ironic, as there are a million more jobs in Chicago). My husband and I bought a 12.5 acre farm with a house and a 4-stall barn for just over $250,000. We estimated that it cost $100 per month to keep a horse on our property.

    I ended up hating it! There were NO barns around, just a few backyard 4H families. No shows to go to, and no trainer around to trailer to for lessons. We ended up selling the farm and buying a house in the closest town, and now I drive to a boarding farm.

    I feel your pain!



  9. #9
    Join Date
    May. 7, 2006
    Posts
    211

    Default I love Oregon

    It's great for endurance riding we have a lot of diffrent riding styles and it's very horsey but showing unless your up by Portaland in Dressage jumping is hard, I'm trying to start riding and training in dressage and everyone knows everyone very small.

    I'm guessing it's going to be very hard with so few and people seem to have a ton of money or not much at all. I'm in the not much at all group.

    Dressage is a growing sport, it's MUCH bigger then it was even five years ago.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr. 27, 2006
    Location
    Maben, MS
    Posts
    965

    Default

    Proffie - I moved to MS for a job. Before that I was in SC, and before that -one of the big dressage-mecas (Los Angeles) for 10 years..... hmm, I have upsized on farm size and drastically downsized on access to trainers/shows.... how'd that happen?! There's not even a lotto in MS so I am stuck unless I move to another job

    I just try to make do.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    May. 5, 2005
    Posts
    521

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by feisomeday View Post
    I figure the clients would follow them anywhere, and most have hella money anyway so don't need to work (no good jobs here) and the same for the backers.
    People who are independently wealthy and can live anywhere are looking for other quality of life issues when looking at a new location. Can the husband play golf at a nice golf club while the wife goes off and rides? Are there high quality doctors and health care? If they like the theater, opera, or ballet are there decent cultural activities? Will there be anyone in their social-economic level they can socialize with?

    For most of the people I know who fall into this category, if horses are not the focus of both spouses, the horses come behind all this in determining where they will be happy.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    May. 12, 2006
    Posts
    1,165

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by twofatponies View Post
    I'm sure it's somewhat related to where high-paying jobs are. New York, the Capitol area, LA all have lots of jobs that pay lots of money. So the sheer numbers of people who can afford fine horses, big time shows, top trainers, etc. are concentrated around there. At least that's my impression. The areas north of NYC are full of horse farms large and small, and hundreds of people who take their whole barn down to Florida in the winter. That means there's lots of good vets and farriers, lots of trainers and boarding facilities, lots of local and regional shows as well as the bigger shows, and so on. That also means there's lots of services available to the regular folks who live in and around the area, although it also means some things, like land, tend to be quite expensive.
    Yes. To attract competitive dressage riders with the money to support fancy horses and showing, trainers need to be where the high-paying jobs are. Whether the rider or the spouse has the high-paying job, someone's gotta pay those BNT bills. Dressage is not like golf in that golfers can have their second home out near a beautiful golf course. A dressage rider serious enough to ride with a BNT rides year-round, not just on weekends or vacations. And if the rider is among the "idle rich" who can be wherever whenever, they tend to stick near fancy shopping. Thankfully Oregon is not known for fancy shopping.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan. 18, 2008
    Location
    Eugene, OR
    Posts
    440

    Default

    There are a few amazing dressage trainers out here, but they're lower profile. My instructor has ridden at GP (though not extensively) and is the best instructor I know (which is saying a lot, given my clinician/instructor resume). She's just hard to find (not on the net, small and inconspicuous farm on a side road. She does head to CA from time to time in the winter, though, and she's not super-compete-o-rama (though she does compete). Personally, I think this makes her a BETTER instructor.



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