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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar. 6, 2008
    Location
    Berkshire & Surrey
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    578

    Default What do you, as the buyer, want to see?

    I know there was a thread on this not too long ago, but I thought I'd get some specific feedback as to what I'm doing.
    Because I'm moving to Virginia in October, and I don't feel an intense working student program would necessarily be good for him, I've made the hard decision to sell my Dannyboy. Now, with the market being what it is, and him not having an extensive competition record and needing some finishing touches, I'm not asking much - only 5k. But I'm trying to treat marketing him the way I would a 50k horse - mainly because I really want to find him the PERFECT home (he's very sensitive and TB-y so I really don't want to sell him to just 'anyone'). So far, I've set up a little website - on the home page is a picture and the essentials; name, registry, height, age, sex, price, etc. Then there's a picture page, divided into conformation, riding, and miscellaneous sections. Then a video page. And then a contact page with my name, number, and email, and a little Google Maps thing where interested buyers put in their address and it gives them directions to the stable he's at. I'm buying photo ads on DreamHorse and Equine.com but will not be doing so until all the necessary pics and videos are on the site, to avoid the whole "coming soon!" thing. I'm also being totally honest with people about what he is, and what he isn't. While he's a fantastic horse who I'm sure could be very competitive at Training with a confident rider, he's by no means an Olympic prospect, lesson horse, or beginner's horse.
    So here's my question - if you were a prospective buyer, what else would you like to see? What would make it really easy for you to evaluate and glean information on the horse? Any tips would be great! Thanks!



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun. 20, 2005
    Location
    Tennessee and Kentucky
    Posts
    2,132

    Default

    I think everything you are planning on doing sounds perfect. I can't think of much more that I would want to know.
    T3DE Pact



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug. 9, 2007
    Posts
    8,909

    Default videos

    yeap everyone now wants a video, so if you post some on youtube with directions to the site, everyone will look. you can do this on dreamhorse too.
    The first thing I look at is the picture, not the distance from where i live.
    and then all the other info you have is very good, height, color, experience, how long you've owned him, some things that make him stand out from other horses, so if he has any funny, cute mannerisms, etc., list them (altho I guess pros don't care about personality, but I do).



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar. 30, 2007
    Location
    Hollowed out volcano in the South Pacific.
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    10,797

    Default

    If you want to sell a good horse to a good home, you have to show the awesomeness any way possible. Even just getting the little things on camera like how friendly the horse is when it sees you are around, it's funny moments, and the playful things it does, helps sell it to a good home. People love horses with performance and personality so just try to portray the horse in the good ways that come to mind when you think about it.
    SPACE FOR RENT



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2007
    Posts
    2,169

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rideforthelaurels16 View Post
    Now, with the market being what it is, and him not having an extensive competition record and needing some finishing touches, I'm not asking much - only 5k. But I'm trying to treat marketing him the way I would a 50k horse
    I'd love to hear how this goes! Keep us updated on what sort of response you get and how soon you find the right buyer (very soon I hope.) Sounds like you have all the ducks in a row and are giving him the best possible chance.

    Just a thought...you might consider listing him for a slightly higher price, 6-7k, so that you can come down for a buyer you think is a good match. 5k is kind of a mental breakpoint. 5k and under can signal "cheap, there's something wrong here," 5-10k sounds a bit more like a serious horse (purely emotional prejudice, I'm not saying there aren't fabulous horses out there for lower prices).

    This is not advice, just something to consider. You know your horse and your honesty is admirable and will be your most valuable resource for finding the "perfect" home.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar. 6, 2008
    Location
    Berkshire & Surrey
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    578

    Default

    Thanks guys - I've been putting all the "cute" pics on the site; pictures of him wearing a party hat and eating cake on his birthday, playing with a foal, pulling faces, etc. He really is a goofball, and I'm not marketing him to pros anyway - more the ammy adult group.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct. 19, 2006
    Location
    area II
    Posts
    1,623

    Default

    Be careful about being "honest".
    These days, buyers WILL read between the lines. They assume if you say he looks at stuff, that means he has a big spook!
    They assume if you say sensitive, that means he is a nut!
    Yes, be honest of course,
    but be careful not to shoot yourself in the foot.
    You might consider saving some of the "honesty" until you get on the phone with them and they can determine that you are in fact speaking it like it is!
    I am selling a pony and I think I made that mistake. What I said is exactly what you get.
    I am going to change the add!



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2002
    Location
    Azle, Teh-has
    Posts
    7,594

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by eventmom View Post
    Be careful about being "honest".
    These days, buyers WILL read between the lines. They assume if you say he looks at stuff, that means he has a big spook!
    They assume if you say sensitive, that means he is a nut!
    Yes, be honest of course,
    but be careful not to shoot yourself in the foot.
    You might consider saving some of the "honesty" until you get on the phone with them and they can determine that you are in fact speaking it like it is!
    I am selling a pony and I think I made that mistake. What I said is exactly what you get.
    I am going to change the add!
    tell me about it.
    Several years ago I was trying to sell my mare and the potential buyer emailed a little concerned about her boarding set up. She had to cross a bridge to get to the arena. Down below the side drop offs of the bridge there were lone T posts sticking out of the ground. She was asking about crossing at night yadda yadda. I told her: "she'll be fine. If you are worried then take a buddy as a lead the first time".

    I then received a call from my trainer several hours later. "So and So called me wondering why I would recommend a mare that would kill her while trying to cross a bridge. STOP overselling your horse!!!!!"

    OMG. get a grip people.
    I was so tired of wacked out buyers that I just kept the mare.
    http://kaboomeventing.com/
    http://kaboomeventing.blogspot.com/
    Horses are amazing athletes and make no mistake -- they are the stars of the show!



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep. 6, 1999
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    5,221

    Default

    I would keep the honesty. If you have a goofball buyer, then you don't want them buying your horse anyway. If you give all roses and chocolate, then I think you have something to hide. And unfortunately, you will have to deal with the goofballs.
    It all sounds really good.
    I should also mention that if you don't sell him by Oct, you should bring him down here. We have a bigger market. We have more shows so his competition record will be bigger. And you'll be at a pro barn and word of mouth goes a long way. And depending on the barn, it won't be that intense for him. Quite the opposite. You'll be working your butt off. And generally, if you don't have a horse already, you'd be hard pressed to ride any of the pro's for quite some time. They need to mold you in their way first. And having your own horse there would speed that along. They would rather you make mistakes on your own horse, not theirs.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug. 16, 2004
    Posts
    204

    Wink Good video is key

    The perfect video for me has a 360 conformation view, hand walking/trotting away and toward the camera, WTC each walk on the lunge line, WTC under saddle, jumping under saddle, also jumping on a lunge line or jumping chute if he goes better without a rider. We live far away from most advertised horses so the video can make or break the decision to pursue a horse. We have bought many horses from either coast to location is not the problem, getting enough info to buy a plane ticket is. We have bought a few horses from video alone. Good Luck



  11. #11

    Default

    I agree with LisaB, I know lots of working students (who came to work with the VA based trainer I groomed for) who brought horses with them and sold them during their stay. Your trainer can help you tune him up, give you some great professional 'show for sale' tips, and will introduce you to a larger market.

    You'll still probably get a few wack-a-doos though - you can't really go anywhere to escape them!! I'll never forget trying to hold my BNT's fit Advanced mare still for 35 minutes while some crazy video taped every inch of her legs!! Not photographed, but video taped... her legs... while standing still (or attempting to).



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb. 5, 2002
    Posts
    1,942

    Default

    Conformation shots - good ones, that show enough of the horse to see how the parts fit together (don't put up a photo of one foot from the cannon down...). From both sides. Show 3 good gaits, both leads, and enough strides of each to give enough information to make a judgement. Skip the shots of the pretty ponies playing in the pasture way off in the distance, or ripping around in the paddock. Temperament counts for a lot with some people, so show something that indicates temperament, even if it's your 8-year-old niece picking out his feet.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct. 12, 2004
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    1,804

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by purplnurpl View Post
    ...the potential buyer emailed a little concerned about her boarding set up. She had to cross a bridge to get to the arena. Down below the side drop offs of the bridge there were lone T posts sticking out of the ground...
    Are you serious? What kind of freaky place is/was this?!

    Between you, me and everyone on the board, THANK GOD you kept the horse and it didn't end up living with idiots like the owners of that farm! Yikes!!!



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jul. 5, 2006
    Posts
    627

    Default

    If you're going to Phyllis's (or, really, any other pro's barn in VA), I would bring him down with you to ride and sell. She'll help you put on those finishing touches and has so many contacts for potential buyers.

    In any case, good luck!



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar. 6, 2008
    Location
    Berkshire & Surrey
    Posts
    578

    Default

    I would really love to be able to bring him to Windchase with me and sell him there, I'm sure I could find the PERFECT person really easily. The only problem is the cost of trailering him almost 900 miles. But, if he doesn't sell before I move, I gotta do what I gotta do



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jul. 5, 2006
    Posts
    627

    Default

    Yes, the price of gas doesn't help much with the cost of trailering! But, barring any major problems, you would probably be able to sell him for more than $5,000, so long term, it might work out to your advantage.



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