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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan. 9, 2003
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    IN
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    Default small step for Sindarin big step for ME

    Small step for Sindarin BIG step for me. After doing the initial backing at a walk last year, I sent my first homebred to a trainer for a real start. She had just gotten to the point where she cantered a couple of times and the silly horse injured herself in the pasture. I brought her home and apparently her immune system was a bit compromised and she caught a sinus infection. Once recovered, she coughed all summer long. I rode her but didn't do a whole lot. Some financial hits prevented sending her back to the trainer so I was on my own on my own farm with no ring and riding alone. I piddled with her during the winter but it stayed pretty wet so we didn't do too much. I've really just started getting her working again and last week we did our first canter FINALLY! She was ready earlier but I waited until someone could be there for safety. I'm not a brave person and debated about posting this but I'm excited that I might actually have a TRAINING LEVEL horse before long. Keep in mind that for her third canter I took her into the pasture so she had a long straight line and she was wonderful and much more forward. Of course, right after that she scraped up her hock so now has a short vacation. Figures! She's not a fancy mover but I think she's going to be a good horse for me.

    Anyway, if you are still with me, here it is: (you may need to watch on quality mode as for some reason it tends to pause and then fast forward on normal mode)

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0MsRXA2BMPM

    Thanks for listening!
    Last edited by Holly Jeanne; Jun. 26, 2008 at 03:33 PM.
    Whatever you can do, or dream you can, begin it. Boldness has genius, power, and magic in it. Goethe



  2. #2
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    Apr. 10, 2002
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    vancouver, wa
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    Default

    looks great! so what's her breeding? it looks like when she gets into a canter that you start kind of pumping her with your seat and your shoulders start going forward and back. probably because she doesn't feel forward enough, but trying to push her with your seat won't really help with that - believe me, i've tried for years.



  3. #3
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    Default breeding

    Thanks class! You are dead on. I so need some lessons! On our third canter, I took her into the pasture and cantered on a straight away and she was much more forward. Hopefully I will improve as well.

    She is a registered Anglo-Trakehner by Hennessey out of my OTTB mare who was by Northern Flagship. Sadly, I lost the mare about a year and a half ago but I'm reminded of her in both her daughters.
    Whatever you can do, or dream you can, begin it. Boldness has genius, power, and magic in it. Goethe



  4. #4
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    Apr. 10, 2002
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    Default

    well... look at it this way holly.. you must be doing everything right, or you would have already had 537 internet experts posting to your thread and telling you exactly what you are doing wrong. a video posted here with few comments is a rare thing indeed. i look forward to seeing future videos of your progress!



  5. #5
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    Jun. 1, 2003
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    The Shake and Bake State
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    Default

    I can hardly believe they are 5 already, can you? Whoa!

    In the video she looks good but, when you ask her to canter is she kind of sucking back a bit and a little resistent about going forward? She kind of looks like she wants to buck. KIDS!
    ~Amy~ TrakehNERD clique
    *Bugs 5/86-3/10 OTTB Mare* RIP lovely Lady, I miss you
    *Frodo '03 Anglo Trakehner Gelding*
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  6. #6
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    Jan. 9, 2003
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    Default Yup!

    Thanks class! And thanks for the encouragement!

    Hi Bugs! Yes it is hard to believe they are 5! And yes, she was thinking about bucking and didn't want to go forward. It's her reaction to things she doesn't understand and that make her nervous. Once she has a chance to think about it she's generally fine. She tried that once the second time I cantered and found she wasn't balanced for the turn and, knock wood, didn't do it again that ride or the next. Her hock injury is almost completely cleared up now so I hope to start riding her again in the next few days (depending on weather). Hug Frodo for me.
    Whatever you can do, or dream you can, begin it. Boldness has genius, power, and magic in it. Goethe



  7. #7
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    Feb. 3, 2003
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    MASS
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    Default

    With a young horse and not much canter experience, I know with mine, I went up into the half seat to just let him canter forward and loose without worrying about trying to actually "sit" on him. Worked well for me... Might be different for everyone.
    "Personally speaking, if for whatever reason I was stuck with absolutely only having to chose one breed, then it would without hesitation be a thoroughbred."



  8. #8
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    Default you are right!

    Royal Militron: How long do you usually go before you begin sitting? Thanks for the help!
    Whatever you can do, or dream you can, begin it. Boldness has genius, power, and magic in it. Goethe



  9. #9
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    Feb. 3, 2003
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    Default

    I have only brought along 1 horse all the way from the 1st ride to where we are now... So I guess I'm not the best person to be answering that question. With that said, here is my .02 cents!

    I think it probably varies with different horses and riders in regards to how long you would wait before you sat the canter. Depending on how strong/balanced your young horse is now and how quickly they get stronger and more balanced. I think that I didn't canter at all the 1st year I rode my guy (fall of his 3 yr old year); then the 2nd year I'd only canter in big circles in a half seat (4 years) or out in the woods/fields. As our walk/trot work got stronger and more balanced I could start asking him to be more balanced at the canter- as in not just focusing on keeping his lead/keeping a big circle, I'd ask him to rock back a bit more and not have his nose pointed way out like a hunter! ha ha. Honestly, I think I waited until I could get him to go forward and come back a bit in my half seat within the canter gait before I tried to sit. That way I could adjust him so he wasn't going mach 20 around the ring while I was trying to sit, but I did have that "Go" button to keep him forward so he wouldn't bobble or take short steps behind like your mare was doing.

    Keep in mind- with everything I said- when I was bringing my guy along I new I wanted to go slow w/him, he's a 17.3h TB... I had no reason to go fast and just wanted to have fun. I never had a trainer get on him, but always had someone around to go to for advice and direction in the event I got confused or didn't know where to go next.

    I really liked getting a nice forward canter out in the fields or woods before asking him to do a ring canter going in 20 meter circles. That way you at least have "forward" in their heads and won't have a huge challenge on your hands of fixing a not so forward horse to make him/her go forward.

    I'd much rather a horse that's eager to go forward and have to work on controlling that forward movement than a horse that's wayyy backed off from your leg.

    Good luck w/your mare! She's beautiful!
    "Personally speaking, if for whatever reason I was stuck with absolutely only having to chose one breed, then it would without hesitation be a thoroughbred."



  10. #10
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    Feb. 3, 2003
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    Default

    OH... one more thing- If you do decide you're more comfortable sitting for whatever reason, I wouldn't really "sit" like a dressage sitting the canter. I would have it between a two point and a sit with jump length stirrups. It's hard for them to hold us sitting when they're not very strong at cantering to begin with and your working on their back/hind end muscles.
    "Personally speaking, if for whatever reason I was stuck with absolutely only having to chose one breed, then it would without hesitation be a thoroughbred."



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan. 13, 2008
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    Default

    I had a lot of problems getting the video tape to behave. Hhmm.

    But, from what I did see, you have a very nice young horse. royal militron has offered some good suggestions on how to bring her along ... two point position, etc.. Once again, she is very nice. She has the potential to be quite balanced, active and beautiful in the dressage ring. Take your time and go out on the trails a lot if she is safe.

    I think you were wise in waiting a bit to do your first canter until you felt secure.



  12. #12
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    Apr. 20, 2006
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    Between a rock and a hard place, WA
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    Default

    I had a younger horse with a bucking issue - he was laid off several times for injuries so was very behind in his training. I did as Royal Millitron suggested - ask for canter from 2 point and stay in 2 point or a half seat until the canter was established.

    I also didn't try to sit his trot for quite a while, for several reasons. First, because of his bucking issue (although I think they're less likely to buck at the trot than at canter). Second, because he was green and out of shape. Third, because I'm not so great at sitting trot (!!!understatement) and his trot was very big. I wasn't really able to sit it at all until I could get him much rounder and stronger in the back. Your mare looks quite smooth and you seem to sit well (a lot better than I do). As I understand it, though, one should do very little sitting trot until you've built their back up with other work. People who've worked with young horses much more than I have may have other opinions and suggestions, but that was my understanding. ;-)

    Looks good though - tough working alone with no help, isn't it!!!
    www.moranequinephoto.com
    "If I am fool, it is, at least, a doubting one; and I envy no one the certainty of his self-approved wisdom."
    Byron



  13. #13
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    Feb. 3, 2003
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    Default

    I also didn't sit trot until really this year actually. And I'm still not fantastic at it because his trot is so big. I have heard the same- not to sit trot until their backs are strong and they can lift and carry you along.
    "Personally speaking, if for whatever reason I was stuck with absolutely only having to chose one breed, then it would without hesitation be a thoroughbred."



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb. 12, 2006
    Location
    Oregon
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    Default

    She's looking wonderful! Nice and relaxed most of the time. Good going..



    I've started two of mine and will have a third next year. I find it very rewarding to do my own work slowly, with a little help here and there.
    Akal Ranch Blog - http://akalranch.com/
    Simrat Khalsa Fine Art & Photography - http://www.simratkhalsa.com/



  15. #15
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    Jan. 9, 2003
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    Default Thanks guys!

    Lots of great suggests that I am going to work on! Thanks folks! I actually just started sitting the trot for short period about three weeks ago mainly so I could sit and ask for the transition but I didn't want her to think that every time I sit I'm going to ask for a canter. She tends to anticipate enough as it is. I'm working on being able to trail ride but a couple of things need to happen first. One is that I want to work on the anticipation thing a bit and two is I need someone safe to trail ride with. My older mare is super sensitive but actually a good trail horse but I need someone who is comfortable riding her or has their own safe trail horse. Anyone in central Kentucky wanna come down? And MEP, I'm not that great at the sitting trot but she has a fairly flat trot and is smooth as silk, fortunately for me!

    I'm just starting back after her (fairly minor) hock injury and I'm going to keep all your suggestions in mind. Thanks!!
    Whatever you can do, or dream you can, begin it. Boldness has genius, power, and magic in it. Goethe



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