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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug. 10, 2007
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    Ontario
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    Default Pelhams and martingales

    I used to ride my hunter in a regular D and a martingale. Recently my coached told me to start riding him in a pelham. He's only six and hadn't had much done with him before I bought him but he's got a long neck and can be a pig sometimes the plan is to put him back in the big D in a month after he's been getting some serious work.
    Anyway, my question is how many people use a standing martingale with a pelham? I haven't been using one at home but this weekend will only be his second show and I don't want him going around like a giraffe.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    May. 12, 2006
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    1,165

    Default

    Don't.



  3. #3
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    May. 17, 2006
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    bucks county
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    I use the broken mikmar pellham and a standing martingale on my boy b/c he likes to go with his head straight up or hang really heavy in my hands and not stop. The curb action helps a lot and softens him up while giving me more brakes than with a snaffle. The martingale gives him a limit and prevents giraffe mode from kicking in.
    "to each his own..."

    just a horse obsessed girl who finds blogging way more fun than being an adult...
    http://equinerainman274.wordpress.com/



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep. 20, 2005
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    Default

    My eq horse also went in a mikmar pelham and a standing martingale. As long as the martingale is adjusted properly, I don't see how the type of bit you are using changes anything.
    "Are you yawning? You don't ride well enough to yawn. I can yawn, because I ride better than you. Meredith Michael Beerbaum can yawn. But you? Not so much..."
    -George Morris



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov. 3, 2003
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    1,689

    Default

    You probably can't show in this, but I used a happy mouth pelham and running martingale with my giraffe. It really helped me help him build the rightside up muscles and get rid of the upside down muscles.



  6. #6
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    Sep. 20, 2005
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    Now that is something I wouldn't do, at least, not unless instructed to and supervised by my trainer. A pelham + running martingale is way overkill on most horses and such a combination should probably only be used by or under the supervision of a trusted pro.
    "Are you yawning? You don't ride well enough to yawn. I can yawn, because I ride better than you. Meredith Michael Beerbaum can yawn. But you? Not so much..."
    -George Morris



  7. #7
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    May. 15, 2002
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    A 6 year old that "needs" a standing and pelham to plop round a hunter course really needs more training.
    ............................................
    http://www.xanthoria.com/OTTB
    ............................................



  8. #8
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    Jan. 24, 2008
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    My 8yo goes in a broken Tom Thumb and a martingale. It's a balance thing for us. That curb chain helps to stop him from using me as his 5th leg. With just the snaffle he drops behind and telescopes his neck into his shoulders-add leg and he leans hard.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep. 11, 2006
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    638

    Default

    I use a pelham and a standing martingale. None of the trainers I have had ever had a problem with it.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug. 23, 2005
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    VT and MA
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lou-Lou View Post
    I use a pelham and a standing martingale. None of the trainers I have had ever had a problem with it.
    Me too.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec. 1, 2003
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    Tucson, AZ
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    Sure you can use a pelham and a standing martingale just be sure to have the martingale adjusted accordingly, as well as the curb chain. I can't tell you how many people that I have run across that don't know how to adjust a curb chain properly...and some were BNT.

    If it is a mullen mouth bit remember though that your horse is going to want to be up and flexed and that is pretty much what this bit does.

    I used to use one with a horse that was a bit heavy until I could get him fit enough to carry himself better. Then I would drop him back into a snaffle
    ~~Some things are true whether you believe them or not~~

    *Member of the "I hate the crest release" clique*



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar. 14, 2007
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    Zone 7
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    Default

    When you're using a standing martingale the only tack change that should make a difference is changing your noseband.

    If you had a running martingale changing the bit might make a difference... but a D to a pelham won't have any bearing on your use of a standing martingale.
    friend of bar.ka



  13. #13
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    Feb. 29, 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by SmileItLooksGoodOnYou View Post
    When you're using a standing martingale the only tack change that should make a difference is changing your noseband.

    If you had a running martingale changing the bit might make a difference... but a D to a pelham won't have any bearing on your use of a standing martingale.
    UNLESS he was over-reactive to the curb action, tried to lift his head to escape, and freaked when he couldn't. Horses have been known to freak about standings because their "escape route" is cut off. Rearing is a common result when that happens. I'd try the pelham w/o the standing first, for sure. If no problem and the pelham alone isn't sufficient (that's the other part of the equation, why use more tack than necessary, and you won't know if it is unless you try one thing at a time) then add the standing.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct. 15, 2000
    Location
    NY
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    OMG - you guys are too much. It sounds like the OP is making the bit change under trainer's direction and supervision.

    Answer - the reason for the bit change is mutually exclusive from the martingale - leave it be. I am sure your trainer will help with how to hold the reins.

    Better yet, OP - ask your trainer instead of on a BB where you will inevitably be ill-advised.
    I gotta do-over and am doin it my way!!!



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan. 7, 2008
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    853

    Default

    [QUOTE=
    If it is a mullen mouth bit remember though that your horse is going to want to be up and flexed and that is pretty much what this bit does.
    [/QUOTE]

    Could someone expand on this?

    Just generally curious. I use a mullen mouth and would like more information on the action...and why it causes them to be up and flexed?



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Aug. 10, 2007
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    Ontario
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    Default

    holy moly haha, no worries I know how to ride in a pelham. Were only using it because before I bought him in the fall he had spent his whole life going around on loopy reins. Now when you try to get him to actually work he resists and sticks his head up in the air. We don't want him to ever build up the wrong muscles or learn that it's OK to do that so now that I've got time to really ride him were going to start using the pelham, once he's in shape and knows the basic concepts we'll put him back in the big D(french link) so it's more huntery and he can't hold on.

    The pelham he's in is a single jointed, rubber one, and we definately don't have the curb done up severely.

    If he's quiet at the show and isn't going around like a giraffe we won't use the martingale. I was just asking because I can't remember ever seeing a horse in a pelham and a standing so I wasn't sure if it was a hunter no-no that I just hadn't noticed before.



  17. #17
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    May. 15, 2002
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    Quote Originally Posted by TrakeGirl View Post
    Could someone expand on this?

    Just generally curious. I use a mullen mouth and would like more information on the action...and why it causes them to be up and flexed?
    I've never heard of that. A mullen mouth (slightly curved solid bar) works equally on the tongue, bars and lips and so is considered a very gentle mouthpiece. How that would specifically counteract the downward poll pressure of the Pelham cheeks is something I can't see.
    ............................................
    http://www.xanthoria.com/OTTB
    ............................................



  18. #18
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    May. 15, 2002
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    Quote Originally Posted by taita View Post
    when you try to get him to actually work he resists and sticks his head up in the air. We don't want him to ever build up the wrong muscles or learn that it's OK to do that so now that I've got time to really ride him were going to start using the pelham
    So, see, this is the problem - using a Pelham to pull his head down. It's similar to using draw reins. Where training would help is that it would teach the horse to use his back end and round from there, inestad of being pulled in from the front (creating a fasle frame). You'll find that has the added benefit of giving more available jumping power too, as they rock back on the hind end that way.

    Maybe hunters has become very (very) far removed from dressage, but correct training to accept the bit and work from behind should be the same, regardless of discipline.
    ............................................
    http://www.xanthoria.com/OTTB
    ............................................



  19. #19
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    Dec. 5, 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by Xanthoria View Post
    A 6 year old that "needs" a standing and pelham to plop round a hunter course really needs more training.
    Actually, a pelham is thought to be a milder bit than most snaffles, and horses are generally very accepting of it.



  20. #20
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    May. 15, 2002
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    Quote Originally Posted by Melliebay View Post
    Actually, a pelham is thought to be a milder bit than most snaffles, and horses are generally very accepting of it.
    You've got that back to front: snaffles are less harsh than Pelhams.

    Unless you mean a thin twisted wire snaffle with 3# rings in the hands of a monkey!
    ............................................
    http://www.xanthoria.com/OTTB
    ............................................



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