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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan. 2, 2006
    Location
    Colorado
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    2,189

    Default Is this normal?

    One MONTH old colt. I would love to turn him and mom back out into the herd but caught him yesterday calling to a filly through the fence. He was dropped and becoming erect.

    He couldn't actually *do* anything, could he?

    He has both of his testes. It's going to be a long 5 months until gelding at this rate



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug. 26, 2001
    Location
    Oxford PA
    Posts
    10,337

    Default

    No, he shouldn't be able to do anything yet.

    BUT, he could have been gelded the day he was born. In some breeds & some areas of the country, immediate gelding is practiced. You should discuss it with your vet if you are concerned.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan. 2, 2006
    Location
    Colorado
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    2,189

    Default

    He had a slight integual (that's not the right spelling) hernia and my vet wants to wait until october - believe me, it was the first thing I asked when he was born



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar. 11, 1999
    Location
    Clayton, CA USA
    Posts
    4,998

    Default

    I had a very studdy colt one year, who seemed very precocious at just a couple of weeks old. My vet said that colts are sometimes born with a high level of testerone which subsides. Maybe that will be the case with your boy.
    Mystic Owl Sporthorses
    www.mysticowlsporthorses.com



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan. 14, 2003
    Location
    Rawley Springs, Virginia
    Posts
    2,466

    Default

    I don't think there is a single vet in my area that would geld a newborn foal. Much better to wait until fall or winter anyway when the flies are gone. I have gelded just a couple of weeks prior to weaning (if that falls in the non-fly season) and been very happy with that.
    Chris
    Ladybug Hill--Hunters and Ponies
    WWSD? (what would Suerte do?)



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan. 2, 2006
    Location
    Colorado
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    2,189

    Default

    Clint - how long did it take for the testosterone to subside? Did you keep him separated?

    I'll keep an eye on him, but he's not tall enough for heavens sake, never mind anything else

    Do you think it could damage him psychologically one way or the other and affect his future manners?



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar. 11, 1999
    Location
    Clayton, CA USA
    Posts
    4,998

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Molly Malone View Post
    Clint - how long did it take for the testosterone to subside? Did you keep him separated?

    I'll keep an eye on him, but he's not tall enough for heavens sake, never mind anything else

    Do you think it could damage him psychologically one way or the other and affect his future manners?
    No, he stayed with his small group, which consisted of him and another broodmare and her filly. He became less studdy going into the second month, as I remember, and acted like a normal colt for the rest of his time as a suckling. It has been a few years, but I was alarmed enough about him acting like a stud that I had that chat with my vet.

    Even if it could be done, I wouldn't geld a newborn. That is one thing I don't want to worry about; newborns are worrisome enough.
    Mystic Owl Sporthorses
    www.mysticowlsporthorses.com



  8. #8

    Default

    I just had a 2 month old in for a hernia operation and figured I would get him gelded at the same time. Vets recommended against it and since they are the experts, we did not geld. I just thought it would be great to get both done at once.

    Nancy!



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb. 10, 2006
    Location
    Middle of Nowhere, take a right, FL
    Posts
    4,443

    Default

    I've known many breeders (generally stock horses though if that matters) that geld right away (at birth or within 2 days before they go back up). I've never heard a vet say anything about not doing a healthy foal. And if they are going to be under anyway why risk anesthesia twice?
    Every mighty oak was once a nut that stood its ground.

    Proud Closet Canterer! Member Riders with Fibromyalgia clique.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep. 29, 2007
    Location
    Northern CA
    Posts
    1,616

    Default

    A lot of babies get gelded at 30 days - it isn't uncommon, especially some of the big race horse breeders (Standardbred & Tbred). I've had foals who are very studdy early on, some of them grow out of it, others don't. I've got one right now who is going on 3 months (and looks like he's 6 months), and he isn't growing out of it. He is already sold, so I can't geld him!



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar. 4, 2008
    Location
    Birmingham, AL
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    1,631

    Default

    I had one like this. The biggest concern is that they will get hurt by a mare because some mares just aren't having little Timmy act like he is a big boy even if they are in heat. The other thing is that they will try to mount mares that are not in heat because they don't know better or are confused about the process. I had to geld my colt at 3 months because I was really worried he would get hurt and didn't want to deprive him of socializing with other foals. He was talking to them like a mature stallion and trying to mount the mares. At 3 months his testicles were larger than the colt I gelded at 1 1/2 years. He was also packed out with muscle, huge boy.
    Altamont Sport Horses
    Trakehners * Knabstruppers * Appaloosa Sport Horses
    Home of stallions: Ambrosius af Asgard "Atlantis" & Hollywood Hot Spot
    Birmingham, AL



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun. 1, 2005
    Location
    Floral City , Fl.
    Posts
    4,242

    Default

    I have lots of the little boys act like that. Its a stage they go thru. Some of mine go up and down the fence line trying to get Blue Who (Hootie) to run with them. He is in the pasture next to them. Double fenced. They watch Hootie, call to him, posture like big boys in front of him, strike out, and you know, its all just fun and games. This behavior goes away soon. Some do it more than others, but believe me, it all goes away.
    Sometimes, the litttle boys that are 3 or 4 months old start jumping on their pasture mates. This, again, goes away. It USUALLY (I say this tongue in cheek) does not start up again until they are long yearlings.

    Its just colts. They act like little boys at times. Go with it. It does not last.
    But NO WAY EVER would i do a castration on a very young foal. NEVER!!!!
    Last edited by Sugarbrook; Jun. 18, 2008 at 10:22 PM. Reason: re-thinking my post
    Sandy
    www.sugarbrook.com
    hunter/jumper ponies



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct. 3, 2004
    Location
    East Berlin, PA
    Posts
    229

    Default

    Molly,
    I had one like this at two months old.. I was shocked and worried .....
    he went so far as to approach mature mares.. they were NOT amused by juniors attempts to be a stallion.....he moved off when threatened.... but he pinned his ears right back while retreating!!!!!!!

    It lasted about 2 weeks then he was done, and acted like a "normal" respectful colt, in fact he was very easy, NICEST colt to handle, and very laid back attitude.... (we did one Come to Jesus meeting when he tried to bite and kick me during his manly phase).

    He never again acted interested in mares, though once weaned he went out with boys I did not have to wean early, he was gelded at a normal age. I do suspect, he finally got taken to church by one of the mares also

    I just wanted to give you reassurance yours wasn't the only colt to discover his ahhhhhhh assests early on

    Good Luck
    "Sport N Curls"
    Sport Horse type Curlies and Sport Ponies with the mind, looks and athletic ability to compete in a variety of disciplines.
    www.seldomcreek.com



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan. 2, 2006
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    2,189

    Default

    Well I tried putting them all together and things went just fine for a while, then he got ideas above his station with the older mares and yup, you were all correct, they were highly unamused, so that's that experiment done with and I'll wait for him to grow out of it, I guess.

    I'm glad it's relatively normal I can't help feeling dreadfully sorry for his dam though.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jun. 1, 2005
    Location
    Floral City , Fl.
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    Default

    Molly, for some reason, over the years, I have found my mares much more tolerant of the little colts than they are of their filly babies. Thus, some bad behavior goes unpunished. I wonder if others have seen this? My very strict sage broodmares have a little colt, and it seems they just go.............ahhhhhhh...........!!!!!
    Sandy
    www.sugarbrook.com
    hunter/jumper ponies



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