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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2006
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    3,269

    Question WWYD with a stallion that you could no longer keep??

    We are planning to relocate some time this fall. The new place will not be set up as a large breeding op and multiple stallions. I have been trying to sell one of our stallions for a year with no suitable buyers coming forward despite a 50 to 75% reduction in price. This horse has been good to us by siring outstanding, pricey foals. I have even offered to GIVE him back to the previous owner/breeder, but she sold him to us due to her bad health and can't take him back. I don't want to see him go to unpleasant circumstances - as in spending the rest of his life in a stall without turn-out...he LOVES his huge pasture and private barn here!! I can't bring myself to take him to a registered horse sale and donating to a college would put him in unacceptable living conditions due to their limited space. I've even offered to geld him as a riding horse prospect (he's well broken), but have no good takers there either!! EEEK !! Any suggestions??
    www.crosscreeksporthorses.com
    Breeders of Painted Thoroughbreds and Uniquely Painted Irish Sport Horses in Northeast Oklahoma



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb. 2, 2007
    Posts
    196

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    Geld him and put some trail miles on him. He'll end up much happier in the long run and can have some friends!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct. 3, 2002
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    it's not the edge of the earth, but you can see it from here
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    12,079

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    please, please... consider getting the word out and give or free lease or breeding lease to someone talented but poor!

    Before I get jumped on, of *course* they must be able to CARE for him... but someone who perhaps wouldn't even consider making an offer because the purchase price is just not justifyable right now...

    My stallion came as a free lease, because *his* owner had too many boys, and some health issues etc. I've since become full partner, and he's the best thing that ever happened to me. I love having someone to share his adventures with... it works.

    Word of mouth is probably the only way you'll find the 'right' person. But tell everyone you know--people who've bought his kids, mareowners who've bred to him, the vet, the farrier... this is a good place to start Someone will know someone deserving and wonderful.

    I know people have lease nightmare stories, but there are GREAT stories out there too, I like to think my three have been three of them.
    InnisFailte Pinto Sporthorses & Coloured Cobs
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Bits are like cats, what's one more? (Petstorejunkie)



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr. 8, 2004
    Posts
    832

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    Quote Originally Posted by crosscreeksh View Post
    We are planning to relocate some time this fall. The new place will not be set up as a large breeding op and multiple stallions. I have been trying to sell one of our stallions for a year with no suitable buyers coming forward despite a 50 to 75% reduction in price. This horse has been good to us by siring outstanding, pricey foals. I have even offered to GIVE him back to the previous owner/breeder, but she sold him to us due to her bad health and can't take him back. I don't want to see him go to unpleasant circumstances - as in spending the rest of his life in a stall without turn-out...he LOVES his huge pasture and private barn here!! I can't bring myself to take him to a registered horse sale and donating to a college would put him in unacceptable living conditions due to their limited space. I've even offered to geld him as a riding horse prospect (he's well broken), but have no good takers there either!! EEEK !! Any suggestions??

    when we downsized (and it is sadly inevitable to those who stay in the business long enough) we gelded our oldest stallion (at age 14) and gave him to a friend...She and he are fast friends and travel the trails together on long term trail riding treks...It was the best thing we have ever done...consider it if you love him that much....
    We kept the above's son, and will no longer be breeding him despite his quality and his that of his offspring (after all, who really cares??) so he will be gelded this fall and will have a life here with us out with a few of his beloved mares that are left here...no more aloneness, no more squalling without breeding, and no fear on our part that he isn't being taken care of in the best of environments....just some thoughts...



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2006
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    3,269

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    All good ideas, but...out here in rural Oklahoma there aren't many facilities that I know of where I would send a horse. I'm out of the East coast market , here!! I have discussed a lease with my vet, who is considering it - good facility, good care and she could also ride the horse. I may put an ad on the internet offering him as a lease to an approved home. I have considered gelding him, but at this point it seems a shame to create a gelding worth a few hundred dollars on the open market versus a 16.2 hand b/w homozygous stallion. I believe his genes are worth more than his body in today's world!! And he does have lots of trail miles on him as well as dressage training, but after 16 years of being a stud and living in a solitary pasture (next to other horses, but not WITH them) I don't picture him thrown out with a herd!!! Thanks for the ideas!
    www.crosscreeksporthorses.com
    Breeders of Painted Thoroughbreds and Uniquely Painted Irish Sport Horses in Northeast Oklahoma



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan. 14, 2003
    Location
    Rawley Springs, Virginia
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    I am not sure that color is that much of a reason to not geld him. I agree that he would probably find a safe lifetime home as a great gelding. Once a stallion leaves your hands you just don't really know how he will be managed. True with a gelding too, but so many people have crazy ideas on how to manage a stallion. Turnout and socialization is both paramount as well as problematic with a stallion.
    Chris
    Ladybug Hill--Hunters and Ponies
    WWSD? (what would Suerte do?)



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct. 25, 2006
    Location
    Central Illinois
    Posts
    822

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    So, what are his accomplishments?? Please tell me that it is just not his color that makes him worthy to breed?!?!

    If you havent noticed, w/hay being so expensive, the horse market is weak.

    People NEED to quit breeding for silly things like color.

    There are too many low end horses.

    Please GELD him to give him a chance for a good home. He will have very little options as a stallion.

    Slaughter is still a very big reality to horses.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov. 28, 2003
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    MO
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    I would agree that he is going to be easier to re-home as a gelding.
    Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm."
    --Winston Churchill
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Hills...h/112931293227
    www.HillsideHRanch.com



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec. 2, 2002
    Location
    Waterford, VA USA
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    Just curious, what are you doing with your other stallions?
    Siegi Belz
    www.stalleuropa.com
    2007 KWPN-NA Breeder of the Year
    Dutch Warmbloods Made in the U. S. A.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar. 20, 2005
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    762

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    What a pretty boy! You could give him to me .

    Seriously, though, a few of the TB farms here in KY keep very nice QH or paint (or other breed) horses as their teasers, and then breed them to a few outside mares as well. The ones I know of have a pretty darn good life.



  11. #11
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    Dec. 21, 2005
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    Cascade Foothills
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    I've been drooling over your horse since you put him on your sales page. I wish I were horse shopping! He looks like a nice fellow, and the color is the icing on the cake!

    I gelded and sold a really handsome Spotted Draft stallion a few years ago because I didn't want to risk A) insufficient turnout B)incompetent handling or C)indiscriminate breeding in his future. He ended up at a great facility with a fantastic young rider, and I'm not sure he would have been able to live there had he still had his balls. Might be something to consider. I love color but I will also argue that there are plenty of fantastic sport horse sires out there (including Sempatico, who offers homozygous color).

    If you're still looking for a home for this guy in a couple of years, drop me a line!
    My ears hear a symphony of two mules, trains, and rain. The best is always yet to come, that's what they explained to me. —Bob Dylan

    Fenway Bartholomule ♥ Arrietty G. Teaspoon Brays Of Our Lives



  12. #12
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    Dec. 21, 2005
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    Here's another idea to consider - collect him, freeze and store the semen, and then either keep him as a gelding or sell/lease/free-lease him as a riding mount. Managing frozen semen is probably cheaper and easier than managing a stallion.
    My ears hear a symphony of two mules, trains, and rain. The best is always yet to come, that's what they explained to me. —Bob Dylan

    Fenway Bartholomule ♥ Arrietty G. Teaspoon Brays Of Our Lives


    1 members found this post helpful.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2000
    Location
    El Paso, TX
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    12,191

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    I looked at him on your website, but I think you'd get more interest if you posted more riding pictures, and maybe his show/performance record. He's a pretty color, but most people intersted in standing a stallion would like to see those things.

    If he has a good performance/show record, then maybe consider gelding him and selling him as a riding horse rather than a stud. He'd be more likely to get into a situation where he would be turned out with others and not end up living a solitary life. Plus, many people who board, like myself, are at barns that aren't set up for stallions or won't accept them at all.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar. 19, 2006
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    VA
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    You may want to consider donating him to a place like Virginia Tech where they have a significant breeding program. They are well taken care of and if I am not mistaken have an incredible breeding anex in Middleburg. I know they took a pretty old TB stallion a few years ago that wasn't particularly worth a whole lot. Check them out. Would most likely be less cost and labor intensive than any other route. Good luck!



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Sep. 23, 2004
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    Holland Twp., NJ
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    If you think he has THAT much to contribute then get some frozen off him for a few months then geld him. He'll probably sell, maybe even show and get more accomplishments and the semen will be worth more (perhaps) as there is only a limited amount.
    Do not take anything to heart. Do not hanker after signs of progress. Founder of the Riders with Fibromyalgia clique.



  16. #16
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    Mar. 5, 2008
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    Hes a very good looking boy! I agree with gelding him though, he looks like he would make someone a a very nice show horse. I wish I could get him



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Dec. 21, 2005
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    Have you come to a conclusion about your stallion?
    My ears hear a symphony of two mules, trains, and rain. The best is always yet to come, that's what they explained to me. —Bob Dylan

    Fenway Bartholomule ♥ Arrietty G. Teaspoon Brays Of Our Lives



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Apr. 18, 2000
    Location
    ~~~Virginia Horse Country~~~
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    6,855

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    Just reading this thread for the first time and tried the OP's website and it says it is suspended!!! Anyone know anything about this???
    http://www.talloaksfarm.net ---"Success is not final, failure is not fatal; it is the courage to continue that counts." --- Winston Churchill



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Sep. 14, 2002
    Location
    NE Oklahoma, USA
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    I believe the web manager is updating the site to reflect the price reduction on the farm. It should be back up soon.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Apr. 18, 2000
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    Thanks!!
    http://www.talloaksfarm.net ---"Success is not final, failure is not fatal; it is the courage to continue that counts." --- Winston Churchill



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