The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 26
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep. 12, 2004
    Posts
    1,051

    Default Interesting (?) device

    A new way to tell what your horse is doing w/ it's head....

    http://www.chicksaddlery.com/page/CDS/PROD/1070/OTV508

    Sort of thinking that that might mine take his whole body 'vertical'...



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun. 13, 2001
    Location
    usa
    Posts
    6,135

    Default

    As if riders didnt alway fixate on the area behind the poll enough. Omg. That would suppose that the horse is to be (steadily) at the vertical instead of slightly ifv.
    I.D.E.A. yoda



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan. 24, 2000
    Location
    Boulder
    Posts
    3,500

    Default

    And as if riders aren't already looking down enough! I would constantly be adjusting my wingnuts.

    When working with this device, riders should wear something like this

    http://www.villagehatshop.com/propel...ogle&kw=191301

    to be sure their heads are level as they are staring down.
    Last edited by Kathy Johnson; May. 26, 2008 at 07:18 PM. Reason: agreement



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr. 8, 2004
    Location
    The Great, uh, Green (?!?!) North!
    Posts
    3,877

    Default

    It actually shows all three...

    Red - BTV
    White - V
    Green - IFV
    "Adulthood? You're playing with ponies. That is, like, every 9 year old girl's dream. Adulthood?? You're rocking the HELL out of grade 6, girl."



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep. 8, 2007
    Posts
    2,900

    Default

    Wow, I had to spend several months with a very good dressage trainer to stop fixating on my horse's head. That device would put me right back at square one. Perhaps a monitor to tell you when your horse is engaging his hind end and reaching under with his hind legs would be more appropriate, LOL!



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct. 31, 2001
    Location
    West of insanity, east of apathy, deep in the heart of Texas.
    Posts
    15,797

    Default

    "Wingnuts", indeed. Those are the only folks who would actually use something like this.
    In loving memory of Laura Jahnke.
    A life lived by example, done too soon.
    www.caringbridge.org/page/laurajahnke/



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2005
    Location
    Northeast
    Posts
    10,937

    Thumbs down

    A head tosser would be deadly with this!

    It doesn't maintain a position, It just tells you when you horse's head is on the vertical.
    What a relatively harmless, worthless piece.
    Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr. 1, 2003
    Location
    Cocoa, Fla
    Posts
    4,234

    Default

    My horse would pitch a fit if I put something that uncomfortable under her headstall.
    Sandy in Fla.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec. 19, 2007
    Posts
    2,094

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tollertwins View Post
    A new way to tell what your horse is doing w/ it's head....

    http://www.chicksaddlery.com/page/CDS/PROD/1070/OTV508

    Sort of thinking that that might mine take his whole body 'vertical'...
    It's amazing to see what people do to beat the Germans and Dutch in dressage



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct. 19, 2006
    Location
    area II
    Posts
    1,623

    Default

    My daughter is learning dressage with her pony. I sent that link to her trainer. I still have not forgiven her trainer for thinking a just might be serious! Ouch!
    Yep, we have a head tossing Arab around here. I have visions of his riders face getting whacked a bit with that lovely device



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr. 10, 2002
    Location
    vancouver, wa
    Posts
    1,009

    Default

    seems harmless compared to all of the other devices out there. i really don't see any reason that it needs to be ridiculed.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar. 1, 2005
    Location
    maryland
    Posts
    5,219

    Default

    If it spins beyond the red, does that mean "rollkur"?

    It's a cute wheel. It would be cuter if they attached pinwheels to it or something.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2000
    Posts
    24,408

    Default

    i don't really see what the problem is, except the obvious issue of you are going to have that thing sticking out the back of your throat if you ever fall off frontwards.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    May. 12, 2008
    Posts
    4,168

    Default

    Maybe it is secretly marketed by a head tossing horse, hoping to get more 'weapons' out to his equine friends....

    It is harmless otherwise and won't damage horses if used incorrectly. It has that going for it.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Sep. 12, 2005
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
    Posts
    3,768

    Default

    I think it's ridiculous. Whatever happend to riders becoming good horsemen and learning feel? If you don't know what your horse is doing under you, you need lessons not a device.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Aug. 14, 2004
    Posts
    7,540

    Default

    LS - you are being a bit of a spoilsport.... sheesh what do you expect - that people take the time to learn to ride well?



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Sep. 12, 2005
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
    Posts
    3,768

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mbm View Post
    LS - you are being a bit of a spoilsport.... sheesh what do you expect - that people take the time to learn to ride well?

    You're right. Sorry, what was I thinking?



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2000
    Posts
    24,408

    Default

    I don't think there's any reason to get all high and mighty about this or accuse people of not wanting to learn to ride.

    If it actually works, and breaks apart if yiou happen to hit it, I don't see the problem with it. No better way for a beginner to get some feel for how the horse feels when he's rounder and more supple. My objection is that it becomes basically one thing more to run into and get jammed down your throat, if things don't go quite as planned.

    People starting in dressage actually have a very tough time 'feeling' where their horse's head is. They can't see it, and they can't connect up what they feel with where the horse's head and neck is. If the horse is not bending and is resisting the bit, this will help them connect up how that feels with how it looks.

    Like any device, it can be misused, and of course there is the problem that a bazillian people think dressage is all about making a horse 'assume the magic position'. But they're going to be misusing any piece of equipment, including their reins.

    No, I don't particularly care for any sort of 'dressage appliance', and they all can be misused or be used as a crutch. But they do not fill me with righteous indignation, or make me want to speak with dismay about how 'others' 'don't get it'.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jan. 24, 2000
    Location
    Boulder
    Posts
    3,500

    Default

    I truly might buy it if it tweedled a tune in time to my horse's tempo (and more bling, please, glitter that thing in Swavorski crystals.) I am all for multi-media.

    Other dressage "appliances" I might like to see:

    The Freezer. Stop action remote controlled camera to shoot a picture of the horse in the perfect moment (as dictated by the OTV training aid)

    The Range: to increase the range of the rider's sitting trot. This would resemble a Homedics vibrating, heat on demand, sheepskin seat saver. Sold as a set with gel-soled stirrups.

    The Swiffer: all in one grooming wand, riding whip. For those hard to reach places, or to touch up as you ride.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jan. 13, 2008
    Posts
    5,649

    Default

    OMG.

    That is hilarious.

    Since the horse's "head" should be in front of the rider I am having a hard time understanding why rider's cannot "see the head" as some have stated. Maybe they should open their eyes.

    If the rider cannot see the poll of their horse while they are sitting in the saddle, maybe they should consider that the neck is overbent. Perhaps.

    Edited to ad: A rider is supposed to be able to barely see the orbit of the eye and the edge of the nostril on a circle when the horse is bent properly. From that a rider should be able to tell if a horse is on or close to the vertical. Other wise, the rider is not advanced enough to be worrying about the vertical. They need to learn to follow the horse's natural gaits first before attempting to impose the aids to a large enough extent to bring a horse close or onto the vertical. Just a thought.



Similar Threads

  1. GN trailer breakaway device
    By ToTheNines in forum Around The Farm
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: Aug. 28, 2012, 02:22 PM
  2. Farrier's advice wanted regarding this device
    By Cayusepapoose in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 61
    Last Post: Jun. 25, 2012, 01:06 PM
  3. Anti Kicking device
    By DrivingQueen in forum Around The Farm
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: Jan. 23, 2012, 10:44 PM
  4. HiTie type device
    By Dapple Dawn Farm in forum Endurance and Trail Riding
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: Apr. 27, 2011, 01:18 PM
  5. Stock bottle transfer device
    By PSD in forum Around The Farm
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: May. 7, 2010, 11:59 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness