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  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by pegasus44 View Post
    I forgot about the half-Arabian that Vanessa Fenwick events named ERODIUM. Bred by Tamarillo's breeder, out of an Arab mare and by a DWB.

    She also had the Anglo DHUNDHU by Arabian Dhruv out of a TB mare, but he died last year, also the same breeder.

    Here's ERODIUM:

    http://anglo-arabians.com/Images/Erodium.gif

    http://anglo-arabians.com/Images/Erodiumdr.gif
    Is that his registered name?
    I'd love to look him up, but can't tind him under "Erodium".
    "It's like a Russian nesting doll of train wrecks."--CaitlinandTheBay

    ...just settin' on the Group W bench.



  2. #42
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    May. 27, 2007
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    Maryland
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    318

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    He's registered in the UK probably.

    He is by EMILION out of CALAMINTHA by DHRUV (El Shaklan)



  3. #43
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    May. 4, 2003
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    Canada
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    Friends of mine had a ranch (sold now) at Alkali Lake, BC, and they ran a herd of approximately l00 head, using their Arab stallion and a selection of TB mares (many by Dryland). They preferred them for tough ranch work over quarterhorses. I wish I knew his bloodline because he was a lovely looking horse, but tough and not the stereotypical "show horse" - not meant to be disrespectful, just different.



  4. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by pegasus44 View Post
    He's registered in the UK probably.

    He is by EMILION out of CALAMINTHA by DHRUV (El Shaklan)
    Ah. Datasource only includes Canadian and US partbreds.

    But I can find Calamintha.
    Lots of nice Crabbet blood in that one.
    "It's like a Russian nesting doll of train wrecks."--CaitlinandTheBay

    ...just settin' on the Group W bench.



  5. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Foxtrot's View Post
    Friends of mine had a ranch (sold now) at Alkali Lake, BC, and they ran a herd of approximately l00 head, using their Arab stallion and a selection of TB mares (many by Dryland). They preferred them for tough ranch work over quarterhorses. I wish I knew his bloodline because he was a lovely looking horse, but tough and not the stereotypical "show horse" - not meant to be disrespectful, just different.
    Give me his name or his owners' name, and I'll see what I can find for you.
    "It's like a Russian nesting doll of train wrecks."--CaitlinandTheBay

    ...just settin' on the Group W bench.



  6. #46
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    Jan. 16, 2002
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    FL
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    Foxtrot, I grew up in the midwest and we used arab crosses as working ranch horses as well. Had great dispositions and could go all day without ever having a problem. My favorite was this 15 hand or so arab stallion that was kept in the herd along with a shetland stallion and approximately 20 mares and geldings. They never fought, never injured each other or the other horses, could be walked up to in the 50-100 acre field, caught and ridden in with a halter/bareback. You would never have known they were stallions. Great working horses and fun to pleasure ride as well.

    I miss those days when I was an older teen........sigh.
    "We don't ride the clock. We ride the horse." Reiner Klimke.
    http://community.webshots.com/user/arnikaelf



  7. #47
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    May. 26, 2005
    Location
    Houston TX
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    Glad you posted this - have been thinking the same thing. I love TB's and Arabians - and love the cross. The Arabian does add a lot - endurance, stamina etc etc etc.
    Funny - a friend just gave me a copy of an Arabian magazine. I had stopped looking at them years ago - just could not "go" the posing and goo. So I went through the mag - the usual stuff - and I noticed that the horses seem to have even more extreme heads/muzzles than years past - which was bad enough. Ugh. Then turned the page - and voila!!! - pages and pages of endurance - the Tevis!!! Now those horses and photos I just drool over. Those are Arabians!!!! Talk about one extreme to the other - the goo and foo-foo - turn the page - dust and mud - horses that master a grueling trail.
    Yes - there is definitely a place in eventing for Arab blood.



  8. #48
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    Apr. 16, 2005
    Location
    Frankford ,Missouri
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    Got my first Ay-Rab in 1966- a Davenport stallion.

    Taking my wife's 4yr old Arab/ Dutch Harness Horse* cross to the Queeny Park mini event tomorrow for his first ever outing :-)

    Tom N

    * KWPN Tuigpaarden
    U.S. Olympic Waterboarding Team- Beijing 08



  9. #49
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    May. 4, 2003
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    Canada
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    A place for them for their toughness, kindness and intelligence. But their jumping ability has to be supplied by something else, or find an Arab that can jump with style. Perhaps the Arab should be second or even third line back? Typically they jump like deer. Our Welsh/Arab pony jumped like a Welsh, but had Arab qualities. Then there was an Arab/Welsh that had the Arab jump, croup, high tail and head carriage and hardly any Welsh showing.



  10. #50
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    Aug. 14, 2000
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    Clarksdale, MS--the golden buckle on the cotton belt
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    I was recently given a registered Anglo-Arab of Polish or Russian lines, but she looks like nothing I have ever seen before. She is a stubborn witch with a definite mind of her own.

    I'm going down to take pictures of my herd, and I will try and get a good one of her.

    She was bred by a DQ and most of her training is in dressage. She is not an enthusiastic jumper; she'd much rather walk through than go over. I say this from seeing how she approaches small ditches on the farm. My old TB will see a ditch, and you know it's going to be jumped, even from a walk. She just trundles down to the bottom and back up.
    "I'm a lumberjack, and I'm okay."
    Thread killer Extraordinaire



  11. #51
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    Oct. 1, 2003
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    Talking Difference in Arabs. . . big big big difference

    It's VERY VERY important to distinguish the difference between the Egyptian bred Arabs and ALL the others. The Egyption Arabs basically can't even compete against other Arabians and never in open competition. Having said that I used to ride an Egyption Arab and did quite well in CT, but he was an exception.

    When you watch an all Arab show, find out if it's a general Arabian show or an "Egyption event." The Polish and Crabbet bred are outstanding. This country breeds some fabulous Arabs, all you have to do is attend the Old Dominion or Tevis ride and see what we are breeding for endurance anad conformation.
    RIP Kelly 1977-2007 "Wither thou goest, so shall I"

    "To tilt when you should withdraw is Knightly too."



  12. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by Samrdr1 View Post
    Got my first Ay-Rab in 1966- a Davenport stallion.
    Oooh--who was he?
    "It's like a Russian nesting doll of train wrecks."--CaitlinandTheBay

    ...just settin' on the Group W bench.



  13. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eventer55 View Post
    It's VERY VERY important to distinguish the difference between the Egyptian bred Arabs and ALL the others. The Egyption Arabs basically can't even compete against other Arabians and never in open competition. Having said that I used to ride an Egyption Arab and did quite well in CT, but he was an exception.

    When you watch an all Arab show, find out if it's a general Arabian show or an "Egyption event." The Polish and Crabbet bred are outstanding. This country breeds some fabulous Arabs, all you have to do is attend the Old Dominion or Tevis ride and see what we are breeding for endurance anad conformation.
    I think if you look at some of the "Old Egyptian" blood--before the marketing behemoth of the Pyramid Society and all its hype--you'll find some very sound and athletic stock.
    "It's like a Russian nesting doll of train wrecks."--CaitlinandTheBay

    ...just settin' on the Group W bench.



  14. #54
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    Aug. 10, 2003
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    Oklahoma
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eventer55 View Post
    It's VERY VERY important to distinguish the difference between the Egyptian bred Arabs and ALL the others. The Egyption Arabs basically can't even compete against other Arabians and never in open competition. Having said that I used to ride an Egyption Arab and did quite well in CT, but he was an exception.

    When you watch an all Arab show, find out if it's a general Arabian show or an "Egyption event." The Polish and Crabbet bred are outstanding. This country breeds some fabulous Arabs, all you have to do is attend the Old Dominion or Tevis ride and see what we are breeding for endurance anad conformation.
    Definitely CANNOT and WILL NOT agree with this. Ghazzu is definitely correct, PLUS there are some of the 'newer' Straight Egyptian and E-breds that do VERY well in both Arab and all breed competitions WHEN GIVEN THE TRAINING AND CORRECT RIDING .... even the purebreds. One of our SE (Straight Egyptian) stallions is about 50/50 Babson and 'newer' egyptian. He did well (won) his only time out in USEA competition ... his only time competed because he always had to take a 'back seat' to the more experienced E-bred part Arabs that we had. We're $$ challenged and can compete only 1 horse at a time. His Anglo-daughter went Prelim, even on our limited budget. Another Anglo we bred (out of an SE mare) has been successful at CIC*. While these aren't exactly ground shaking, they do help disprove the prejudice against SE.

    Oh, forgot ... another SE, Schzarad Thundor (by The Minstril), showing under the name 'Sher Khan' had an outstanding show jumping record in all breed, USEF competition ... even placing 2nd in a bona fide Grand Prix. The SE stallion Gharib, bred in Egypt and imported to Germany as head sire at Marbach, also was licensed for 4 different warmblood breeds as were 3 of his purebred sons (one of those also being SE). Both Gharib and his SE son, El Abd, were competed very successfully as jumpers in Germany in all breed competition, and El Abd also sired one of that country's top endurance horses. We're priviledged to have a yearling Gharib grandson (SE purebred) that we bred specifically with Eventing in mind as well as his Trak/Arab half sister. These are both double Gharib as their SE dam, besides being by Gharib, was also out of one of his grand daughters.

    Our current SE-sired purebred competitor (on 'vacation' while his rider awaits her baby boy due next month) won BOTH his YEH-4 competitions. His Novice record ... won 1, 2nd (by 1/2 point) in one, and 5th in his first competition... all Open divisions. In Training level he WON 3 OUT OF 4 times out. This is his ENTIRE list of USEA competitions (we skipped BN, as we always do, and he won every schooling event he was entered in) ... not too shabby for an Egyptian-sired purebred. He'll go Prelim as soon as both he and his rider can get back in shape after the baby. He is a grandson of Thee Desparado and his Egyptian side is almost entirely 'new' E-breeding.

    Years ago, my daughter also rode a purebred Arab through Intermediate H.T.s, CCN*, Area V Young Rider's team, and got her USEA Silver Medal award (three 1-5 places at Intermediate in 1 year) riding only that horse, oh, and he was also the USEA Area V Intermediate champion. This horse, while being Russian sired, also carried a good % of Egyptian blood.

    Yes .... there is DEFINITELY a place for Arab blood in Eventing, including Egyptian bloodlines. Now we need more RIDERS who are able, willing, and blessed with the pocket book, to get both part breds and purebreds of ALL bloodlines trained, out there, and show what they can do.
    Last edited by larapintavian; May. 25, 2008 at 02:30 PM.
    Sharon
    Larapinta Sport Horses
    Arab Eventers



  15. #55
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    Jan. 16, 2002
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    FL
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    I've had a soft spot for Arabs ever since I was a child. My aunt's best friend bred Crabbet line Arabs and we were allowed to ride them occasionally. Wonderful minds and they could jump as well.

    I've never ridden straight egyptian breds so I can't comment on them other than to say that the ones I've seen don't seem to have the conformation needed to excel as riding horses. It would be nice if they are being bred more for use than beauty. If you can call the extreme conformation I've seen, beauty.
    "We don't ride the clock. We ride the horse." Reiner Klimke.
    http://community.webshots.com/user/arnikaelf



  16. #56
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    I stand corrected. . . and happily stand corrected!
    RIP Kelly 1977-2007 "Wither thou goest, so shall I"

    "To tilt when you should withdraw is Knightly too."



  17. #57
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    We have an Arab farm nearby and the woman breeds only straight Egyptians. I saw 4 stallions and a number of brood mares as well as geldings and I have to say none of them could walk a straight line, all of them toed out in front and I wouldn't give you 2cents for any of them.

    I have had Arabs for 30 years and this type of thing drives me crazy. My experience with Egyptians is similar to the above story. I'm so glad to have been corrected.
    RIP Kelly 1977-2007 "Wither thou goest, so shall I"

    "To tilt when you should withdraw is Knightly too."



  18. #58
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    Aug. 10, 2003
    Location
    Oklahoma
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    Unfortunately, altogether too many SEs in the U.S. have been bred by people who were not horsemen or even riders, and those seem to be the ones people see. Thankfully, with the advent of the internet, we're finding out where those really GOOD SEs (meaning good HORSE first, good Arab second) are. They're often in the hands of the smaller breeders who DO value their use in distance riding, the sporting venues and as working cattle horses.... both in competition and for pleasure.

    There is quite a movement going on among SE owners to get these GOOD horses out where they can be seen and used. Maybe then the 'exotic' headed but poor bodied, lousy legged, can't move individuals that have been peddled to those unknowing, but often multi-$$$ owners, by 'paper-to-paper producers' (I won't use the term 'breeder' for these people) will slowly lose the limelight.

    Also, even though 'preservation' breeding has often been blamed for some of the poor quality, this also is not necessarily accurate either. The preservation lines, just like all horse breeding lines, have both good and poor individuals, and likewise both good and poor breeders. One simply has to LOOK for the good ones ... they're out there, but unfortunately are often not the ones highly promoted by the uneducated 'producers'.

    Thanks for listening to my rant.
    Sharon
    Larapinta Sport Horses
    Arab Eventers



  19. #59
    Join Date
    Aug. 9, 2007
    Posts
    9,181

    Default french angloarabian TBs

    Bobthe horse is right....in europe the TBs as are the Arabs are different from those here.
    and when I first saw that Inschallah was a "French Angloarabian TB" I thought it was a misprint, as Angloarabian means here that the horse is part TB and part Arab. But over there, the French Angloarabian TBs are sports horses... not even getting into what facteur selle francais means, they even race them! Inschallah was a big dressage horse, gorgeous pix in all the WB books, and wasn't he the sire of Ideal whom I think is still alive in wash. state?
    so I don't begin to understand what a FAATB is, just that there are lots of them and shagyra (sp) Arabs in the WB lines. including my Hessen's, 16.2, big boy with Arab ears



  20. #60
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    Default Ricky

    Has anyone seen Ricky the grey Arab stallion that's doing dressage??? He's fabulous at least in the video that a friend sent me. I can't remember his registered name.

    If he's as good in the video, he's a perfect example of what Arabs can do.
    RIP Kelly 1977-2007 "Wither thou goest, so shall I"

    "To tilt when you should withdraw is Knightly too."



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