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  1. #1
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    Default Define: "Lower Level Dressage Prospect"

    How do you define the term "Lower Level Prospect".

    I define this as a horse that can do training and first, maybe some second at a schooling show, but not recognized. Someone else told me that it's anything lower than FEI.

    Thoughts?
    "Adulthood? You're playing with ponies. That is, like, every 9 year old girl's dream. Adulthood?? You're rocking the HELL out of grade 6, girl."



  2. #2
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    Hmm.... I would say up through 2nd but perhaps not beyond.

    3rd and 4th levels would be considered "M" or "Medium" level prospects in my mind.

    Spectrum.



  3. #3
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    any non-gaited horse that isn't lame. :-)
    Siegi Belz
    www.stalleuropa.com
    2007 KWPN-NA Breeder of the Year
    Dutch Warmbloods Made in the U. S. A.



  4. #4
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    May. 11, 2008
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    Default

    Well, I read "prospect" to mean the horse has the potential but hasn't actually done it. Since I consider 3rd/4th to be the medium levels, I would interpret Lower Level Prospect to be a horse that has the potential to do a decent 2nd level on his best day. Which really, describes most sound horses on the planet. So, ditto siegi!



  5. #5
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by siegi b. View Post
    any non-gaited horse that isn't lame. :-)



  6. #6
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    Default

    Granted, I’m a novice about it all, but here’s my interpretation, in two parts:

    Lower-Level—below 3rd (Training, 1st, 2nd) at recognized shows
    Prospect—the horse has been seen, at liberty or even under saddle, to have the natural ability, good conformation, and ease of self-carriage to do the work. If not interrupted or retarded by, poor training or riding, he’s a decent prospect. But training will be required.

    Putting them together, what I’d be saying if I said this horse was a “lower level dressage prospect” is that this horse has conformation and ability to, at the very least, perform respectable T, 1st or 2nd level movements with just about anyone on his back. He might go further with the right someone on him, but if you’re just a gorilla, the best you can hope for is 2nd.

    That’s what I’d mean. But I suspect the non-gaited, non-lame definition is closer to the reality of a lotta folks out there…

    ETA: I generally consider myself the gorilla with the good fortune to have access to horses better than I deserve!
    Foxwin Farm
    Home of The Bay Boy Wonder
    and other fine Morgan Sporthorses



  7. #7
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    Default

    Usually means a fairly lazy, calm horse that doesn't jump. They used to call them "a lady's hunter hack".
    Where's the glamour? You promised me glamour!



  8. #8
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    Default

    often a lower level prospect is a horse someone thinks will never be able to do anything past 1st level, but people use that label in a million different ways.



  9. #9
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    It means they think their horse is really pretty.



  10. #10
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    The horse has 4 legs and doesn't like to jump, or not sound jumping, and he has never really done any dressage.



  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ambrey View Post
    It means they think their horse is really pretty.
    Definitly what I think of MY low level dressage horse

    http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?pi...64&id=89904871



  12. #12
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    Default

    This is a great question, because I recently was chatting with a friend who is an FEI level judge, and we agreed that many horses can learn the tricks through GP. Perhaps not well, not necessarily in a truly competitive manner- but they can DO them.

    So, that begs the question, how do you KNOW that a horse (who isn't naturally gaited or crippled) cannot do the work?

    This doesn't mean I think that every horse should be defined as an "upper level" prospect, I just wonder how you exclude the possibility, especially in a young or green horse? And the one with the "VA-VA-VOOM!" trot may never sit- so they are a competitive lower level prospect, but are they more than that, competitively?
    When someone shows you who they are, BELIEVE them- Maya Angelou
    www.americansaddlebredsporthorse.net
    http://www.asbsporthorse.blogspot.com/



  13. #13
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    LOL

    Any horse under 10K!




    <smiling>
    ~Equine Jewelry~
    Used Saddles For Sale
    www.divadesigns.biz



  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ibex View Post
    How do you define the term "Lower Level Prospect".

    I define this as a horse that can do training and first, maybe some second at a schooling show, but not recognized.
    If the horse can do it at a schooling show, why would it suddenly not be able to do it at a recognized show? I don't think the horse knows the difference.
    Quote Originally Posted by SuzieQNutter
    The whip is held across your thigh so as you can still hold the reins without spilling your coffee!!
    SillyHorse adds: Or your wine.



  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by ASB Stars View Post

    This doesn't mean I think that every horse should be defined as an "upper level" prospect, I just wonder how you exclude the possibility, especially in a young or green horse? And the one with the "VA-VA-VOOM!" trot may never sit- so they are a competitive lower level prospect, but are they more than that, competitively?
    And how do you define "competitively" anyway? Wins recognized shows? Scores over 58? Wins schooling shows?

    And some horses could make higher levels with a great deal of effort, and some just cruise through.

    My horse is athletic and a very quick learner. I think if you put a very talented and motivated rider on him, he could do upper levels. That doesn't make him competition for the horses my old trainer owns, purchased specifically for their GP potential. Their respective values account for that

    So definitions are different, as people's goals and motivations are different. I think it's the same with any "prospect" label. Lower level prospects could be the horses that can win recognized shows up to 2nd, or the horse that will be a nice TL horse for schooling shows. When I say "lower level prospect" I might be thinking something much different from someone who is looking for a horse that can go all the way and considers anything less that GP potential unsuitable.



  16. #16
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    ~ a horse that can't do collection: may be not built for it or many be will not stay sound with collection. Collection starts at 2nd level.



  17. #17
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    I get the impression that when put in ads and spoken about in terms of someone evaluating a horse, they are implying that the horse is nice & solid but somewhat average. They have nice gaits, but not excellent gaits and may or may not ever have the physical ability to perform "upper level movements".

    Since it is not often a horse is considered a "medium level dressage prospect", perhaps an easier approach to answering the original question would be with a second; define "Upper Level Movements".



  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dressage Art View Post
    ~ a horse that can't do collection: may be not built for it or many be will not stay sound with collection. Collection starts at 2nd level.



  19. #19
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    Seriously now... if you have to question whether your horse can do upper level, the chance is, he cannot do upper level, at least not with you. If you are an upper level rider, you know what you are looking for in a horse, or if your horse is an upper level horse.

    An upper level horse means, with an upper level rider, he finds upper level work relatively easy. I know horses who do not need to be 'taught' collection, and some do not need to be 'taught' passage. I tend to define lower level and upper level horse, with how he can collect, like DressageArt.

    Prospect ALWAYS means in terms of competition and not schooling shows.

    Due to the fact that the majority of sound horses can do a good training and first level test, I do not believe there is such thing as low level prospect. A low level horse, yes. For instance, my tb would be a low level dressage horse...I would describe him "shown training and first, schooling second (name some movements), can babysit any timid rider at shows." But he is not prospect of any kind, low or high.

    A low level prospect... I mean what are you looking forward to, stuck at the lower levels? Prospect always means the horse hasn't done something, but has potential to do something.



  20. #20
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    Dec. 4, 2005
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    green horse that hasn't been formally trained ie-trail or western horse being sold as "dressage prospect"... Pretty much anyone can (and do) claim this...a horse that hasn't been tested, hence "prospect".



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