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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec. 15, 2002
    Posts
    35

    Default HBO on 5/12 to air TB Slaughter for Profit

    HBO ... Story on Horse Slaughter to Air May 12 at 10:00 PM

    REAL SPORTS INVESTIGATES

    THE SLAUGHTER OF THOROUGHBRED HORSES FOR PROFIT,


    PRESS RELEASE

    Contact: Kristofer Goddard (212) 512-5034

    homeboxoffice.com

    For Immediate Release May 5, 2008

    REAL SPORTS WITH BRYANT GUMBEL

    INVESTIGATES THE SLAUGHTER OF THOROUGHBRED HORSES FOR PROFIT,

    Segments include:

    *Hidden Horses. Few casual horse racing fans are aware that many former racing horses are slaughtered for profit. When a thoroughbred race horse reaches the end of its career or is simply no longer profitable on the track, it is often taken directly to auction and sold for meat. Because horse slaughter is no longer practiced in this country, these
    thoroughbreds are now being shipped by “killer buyers” to slaughterhouses abroad, which are frequently less regulated and less humane than former U.S. slaughterhouses.

    To:
    ALL
    (1 of 1)

    23344.1 <http://forums.prospero.com/alexbrown/messages?msg=23344.1>

    FOB's.. a few of us here have been working for weeks with HBO on a
    story about horse slaughter that is scheduled to air on May 12th at 10pm
    Eastern.
    The horse slaughter piece will be featured on HBO Real Sports with Bryant
    Gumbel!! This is going to give us tremendous exposure..something like 20-30
    MILLION viewers!
    I will be posting further information, including the real story of the
    Sugarcreek Six (who were originally to have been part of this story, which
    required our need for such secrecy!) as details become available.
    This show WILL be the catalyst we need to get our bill passed and finally
    make our horses SAFE!!
    Gail
    http://alexbrownracing.com/wiki/index.php/ONTHEBIT1



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov. 7, 2007
    Location
    SE PA
    Posts
    933

    Default Yeah!

    I just finished reading the "real story of the sugarcreek six".
    Everyone should read it!!



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar. 8, 2006
    Location
    Southeast Pennsylvania
    Posts
    3,173

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Brandy76 View Post
    I just finished reading the "real story of the sugarcreek six".
    Everyone should read it!!
    And where could I find this?



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar. 23, 2005
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    3,845



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul. 13, 2006
    Location
    St. Louis
    Posts
    676

    Default

    I downloaded the document and started reading, but couldn't finish it. Two of my horses were on their way to either the auction or slaughterhouse when we purchased them. The words are too close to home.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul. 30, 2005
    Location
    England
    Posts
    10,966

    Default

    I'm crying here. My god, it's awful...
    Horse Show Names Free name website with over 6200 names. Want to add? PM me!



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug. 30, 2001
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    2,825

    Default

    I can't wait to hear what certain posters will have to say after reading that. I bawled my way through it.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    May. 2, 2003
    Location
    Celina, TX
    Posts
    2,489

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SmallHerd View Post
    I downloaded the document and started reading, but couldn't finish it. Two of my horses were on their way to either the auction or slaughterhouse when we purchased them. The words are too close to home.
    "If you don't come get her, I am taking her to auction." is the statement that prompted my last purchase. I couldn't read the story because I didn't want to picture my mare there. If I could afford it, I would probably make regular trips to the track and see if I could help some horses avoid that trip



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul. 26, 2007
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    1,016

    Default

    I had difficulty reading the story. While I am not opposed to a humane end for the animals, this certainly isn't one. No food, no water, inhumane and over crowded conditions, beatings, etc.

    I'm sad to say I felt murderous, reading about the actions of the workers, the owners and the trainers. They have lost any humanity and kindness they may have once possessed and deserve nothing but our contempt and censure. It takes a certain kind of lowlife to not only work there but to enjoy it.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    56,015

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by onthebit View Post
    I can't wait to hear what certain posters will have to say after reading that. I bawled my way through it.
    Crying is easy, finding real life solutions, not so much.

    As long as animal rights people use emotions to try to eventually "free" all animals, showing what is not right, ignoring all that is right and have people falling for that, all that will be accomplished is that eventually ALL of us will lose our rights to our animals.

    All the many stories like the one of our local kill buyer, that picked horses up in a trailer nicer than most of us had, kept them in his same pens right with his own top performance horses and cared for the same, those of course never make the animal right's stories.

    Just remember, you can find people abusing animals and even people in any place you care to look.
    THAT needs fixing, not keeping others from doing something, just because some abuse the system.

    Where are unwanted horses going without horse slaughter? Think about it.

    We are where we are with the hauling to other countries JUST BECAUSE of those like the ones in the story, that in the name of doing good, stupidly closed the US plants down without provision for all those unwanted horses.
    Lets be honest and put the blame of the current situation where due.

    Like it or not, there are many unwanted horses and we need to do something with them now and for the foreseable future.

    Yes, to cry is the easy part.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan. 12, 2007
    Posts
    4,227

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pandorasboxx View Post
    I had difficulty reading the story. While I am not opposed to a humane end for the animals, this certainly isn't one. No food, no water, inhumane and over crowded conditions, beatings, etc.
    Sadly this year has meant a slow painful dreadful death from starvation and neglect for many horses here in the middle of Illinois. Surely if DeKalb were still open they would have had a more merciful end. Those who say it isn't so are out of touch with reality.

    In the 60's & 70's captive bolt was the way horses were put down - swift humane safe. I witnessed it at a H/J in Oakbrook Illinois in 1967. A horse broke it's leg and was euthanized just outside the show arena via CB. He was dead before he hit the ground. I have seen chemical euthnasia go both very well and very very very badly. Horiffic

    As horse lovers we must take a stand against neglect and abuse. There are more horses than our economy can support rght now. Hay is pricey and tight. Feed costs are soaring. We can not support all we raise. DO NOT BREED!!!

    Humane processing for human and animal consumption is needed to ease the strain on the equine economy. Shipping to Canada and Mexico should not be allowed when humane processing can be done right here in the USA Providing jobs and a viable export.

    While the story is a sad one, I can tell you an even sadder one that happened 11 miles from my home this winter where 6 starved to death in their stalls waiting for a meal that would never come. Or another 8 miles from my home where there are three survivors - now fostered at my home. Or another just accross the ravine from me - I could not see - starved to death because the owner stopped paying board. The stable owner CHOOSE not to feed it. He would have hauled it to DeKalb -but the plant was closed He could not find anyone to sell it to for backboard - so he choose to not care for it at all. The SA is not interested in pressing charges - to many bigger fish to fry.

    So *tsk* sad sad sad story you've got there - but there is a much much much darker cloud on the horizon called poverty. Many many many many horses will suffer and die waiting for food that will never come when they could have a swift humane end and become food.

    When will the bleeding hearts get their heads out of their hinneys
    "If you don't know where you are going, any road will take you there"



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2000
    Location
    El Paso, TX
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    18,540

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Woodland View Post
    Or another just accross the ravine from me - I could not see - starved to death because the owner stopped paying board. The stable owner CHOOSE not to feed it. He would have hauled it to DeKalb -but the plant was closed He could not find anyone to sell it to for backboard - so he choose to not care for it at all. The SA is not interested in pressing charges - to many bigger fish to fry.
    The stable owner violated several laws. Most states have rules in place for stablemen's liens, where the horse must be auctioned/sold, and how to divide the proceeds. He most likely could not have lawfully just taken the horse to slaughter in the past.
    It is also illegal to withhold food and water. I find it ironic that the same people who want to tell us how horse cruelty in the slaughter pipeline/auction houses, is rare because there are "laws" to prevent it, yet turn around and use the lack of upholding of abuse/neglect laws to say there is a need for it.


    And Bluey- Did you read the link about the Sugarcreek Six? You've often said that you won't read anything anyone anti slaughter links, so I am curious.
    Eagerly awaiting Jan 20th, 2017. Drain the swamp.



  13. #13
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    Dec. 4, 2002
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    Dungeon of the Ivory Tower
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    Default

    I can't go there. Like SmallHerd, too close to home. I'll gear up for it.
    www.specialhorses.org
    a 501(c)3 organization helping 501(c)3 equine rescues




  14. #14
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    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
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    Default

    ---"And Bluey- Did you read the link about the Sugarcreek Six? You've often said that you won't read anything anyone anti slaughter links, so I am curious."---

    I read it, because I am curious why so many beat on sale barns.
    I see why, because some in some sale barns abuse horses.
    Well, how that will help the horses those people have at home, tell me?

    Remember, it is the PEOPLE that are at fault, not because some of those horses are going to slaughter.
    Two very different issues here, that so many like to muddle together.
    I think that was Woodland's point, that some choose to miss.

    Our auction barn here would never permit that - at all.
    The cowboy boss has told employers at that sale barn how he wants all animals treated, that they will be fired on the spot if they don't and guess what, they better do things right.
    Someone like that kid kicking horses would have been fired with a few choice words.

    I have seen the sale manager tell customers getting after their own horses they are getting ready to sell to cool it off, if they are getting after their horse while in the sale barn property.

    I don't see why anyone permits that to go on in those sale barns like the one he describes there.



  15. #15
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    Mar. 8, 2004
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
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    23,004

    Default

    This sounds like any Monday at New Holland to me as well. I have never been to Sugarcreek but it sounds the same except for the way the horses are housed prior to the sale itself. At New Holland they are tied to the walls until they go through the ring then they are placed in the pens after they are bought by the meat man. It is there that their halters go into the garbage as they are not needed where they are headed. I personally rescued one horse just because I couldn't bear to leave a horse with that name at the sale. I didn't have the money but I did it anyway with an advance on my credit card of $400. His name was StretchYourFaith.
    I have seen newborns calves with their umbilical cords still dangling beneath them huddled in pens together. I have seen countless animals walk in and simply drop dead as if they can't think of another way to deal with the situation. I have seen an 8X8 pen PACKED with maybe 30 goats of some kind. Not sure what they were but they had very long, straight horns. One of which was embedded so firmly in the stomach of another goat that neither of them could move. I hoped the goat on the ground was dead but closer examination showed him to be very much alive. I brought home 5, one day old kittens that were going to be drown in a water bucket when they were discovered buried in the hay manger where their feral mother had hid them. One of them is sleeping on my desk as I type. The other two survivors have homes with friends of ours. I have seen on more than one occasion, animals that were tossed upon the dead animal pile out back, attempt to stand. I have seen dairy cows with spines so deformed they were unable to keep their legs underneath them. The downer cow laws state the cows must be able to stand so they were shocked over and over again. They struggled so much that their hocks were covered with blood as was the floor. I could go on, but I imagine you get the idea. I think the most poignant thing I have ever seen was a horse standing in the kill pen wearing a halter with the words I LOVE MY HORSE embroidered on the noseband. I didn't have the stomach to hang around until the end of the sale and fish that halter out of the garbage, but now I wish I had.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Aug. 30, 2001
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    2,825

    Default

    I just don't buy the fact that there wouldn't be any starving horses if they could only continue to go to slaughter in this country. These owners can STILL load them up and take them to an auction where they can be bought by kill buyers. The horses just have a longer trip from the sale to the plant. There were people starving horses when the plants were still open here . . . doesn't seem like things have changed much. Except now they can say they wouldn't have done it if they could have sold them to slaughter. Last I checked that was still an option.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Nov. 7, 2007
    Location
    SE PA
    Posts
    933

    Default starve or slaughter

    just a quick observation to those with the "well they'll all starve if the can't go to slaughter" contingent - if the owner can feed, shoe, pay the vet, etc, while the horse is useful to them, why, all the sudden, is it "too expensive" to euthanize? That's it. Right there.

    Sorry, I REALLY didn't post this to start a big debate, I just see over and over again, "well, they will all starve if you can't send them to slaughter" Like that's the only option.

    How about euthanasia? Call the local fox hunt if you have one? To Laurierace - I thought the same thing while I was reading the Sugarcreek Six. Good for the kitties, though - thank goodness for you!



  18. #18
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    Nov. 2, 2001
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    In Jingle Town
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    Default

    Well....greasing the tracks for this wreck, I know...


    naturally slaughter is for profit, otherwise it would be a pretty sick operation.
    Quote Originally Posted by BigMama1 View Post
    Facts don't have versions. If they do, they are opinions
    GNU Terry Prachett



  19. #19
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    Dec. 4, 2002
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    Dungeon of the Ivory Tower
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    Laurierace - your post brought tears to my eyes - I could picture the halter.

    Okay - my soapbox. This is why I have only one horse now - because regardless, I will see him to the end of his life. When/if I can do more, I will. And it is why I send my dribbles, and do my bits and pieces for some rescues. So that I can look my horse in the eye, and say, "Maybe I didn't do everything, but I did what I could."

    That mental image of the horse in the halter with the words, "I love my horse" is going to haunt me.
    www.specialhorses.org
    a 501(c)3 organization helping 501(c)3 equine rescues




  20. #20
    Join Date
    May. 26, 2005
    Location
    Central Maine
    Posts
    411

    Default

    Great article, Gail. Almost felt like I was there, and grateful that I wasn't. I'm an FOB and believe me, sending a few bucks to support the reconnaissance team is the easy part. Mountaineer sounds like the far end of Tobacco Road, and Sugarcreek sounds like...I guess the term I'm searching for is "Third World."
    Proud Anti-Slaughter Handwringer http://www.tbfriends.com/



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