The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar. 2, 2008
    Posts
    14

    Default Is this an ok training schedule?

    Day 1: Jump (bounces and spreads) to build hindquarter muscle (to help with her locking stifles) and for heart/lung development as it's fairly hard work.

    Day 2: Easy (mostly walk) hack with my fiancee and his pony for about one hour.

    Day 3: Trot work (in the school or out hacking) + schooling.

    Day 4: Easy walking hack one hour.

    Day 5: Distance day. Depending on the day of the week and the daylight, either canter/trot work in the school, or a long hack of equivalent length, working on canter/trot distances.

    Day 6: Day off.

    Then the cycle starts again so the days things are done shift (to help with work commitments etc). Obviously the distances/times for the trot and canter work would length as she gets fitter.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec. 11, 2003
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    1,186

    Default

    What is your goal?



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar. 2, 2008
    Posts
    14

    Default

    Our goal is to do 25 mile rides this summer.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar. 2, 2008
    Posts
    14

    Default

    67 people have viewed - but no opinions anyone? Any thoughts welcomed!



  5. #5
    Join Date
    May. 3, 2007
    Posts
    125

    Default

    Hi Bronya, there are some real endurance folks around here, can't think why they haven't answered, maybe they are busy!

    Last year, all winter, spring, and summer, I rode an average of 1-3 hours a day, trails only, 5-7 days a week. My horse made fast work of a 12 mile novice CTR in July. I can't imagaine with all that riding that you do, your horse wouldn't eat up a 25-mile ride. The horse will probably get pretty excited at the event--new place, new horses, etc., and he'll blow right through it.

    I read in a couple of places that you get a horse ready for 25 miles by riding only 3 days a week for 8 weeks if you did it right.

    Try this site and click on Newbie page for more info: http://www.oaats.org/

    You might also set this forum up to go back a year--there are threads about conditioning on this forum.

    Good luck!



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar. 29, 2006
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    1,215

    Default

    More riding than your horse needs. I would suggest 3-4 times per week.
    P.S. I've had two horses with stifle issues. Jumping and cantering isn't what I'd recommend. Maybe I should say, if your horse has had any pain or injury associated with the loose ligaments that are associated with locking stifles. Anything that causes the hind leg to extend further backward is counter productive. So extended trot, canter and jump work all cause the leg to push further back which can cause the ligaments to over extend and become sore and loose again. Uphill work at a slower trot or marching walk, will do wonders. But if your horse hasn't had any soreness or injury causing the loose stifles and is stalled regularly then I can see the reason for daily exercise. There's nothing worse for stifles then standing around in a stall.

    Bonnie



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar. 2, 2008
    Posts
    14

    Default

    She's sugar intolerant to the point where she's virtually allergic to grass so has a little grass-free paddock during the day unless it's raining when she has to come in or it ends up knee deep in mud. As a result, she gets little to no exercise other than when she is ridden. If I'm lucky I can grab some turnout in the school but not always so she has to be ridden on the other days, or she goes nuts (and her legs get really bad). Picture a horse that's so wound up it's dangerous to ride, bucking, mini rears, the lot, so full of adrenalin at being out that nothing stops it, and that's her if she's kept in without exercise. With exercise, she's terribly sweet and relaxed.

    We have tried so many things to help her legs. 24/7 turnout was the best, though that's now out of the question. Jumping, particularly bounces, builds up the muscle quite fast in her quarters and when we do it regularly really helps. We don't jump high though - about 2ft max, certainly no higher than her more enthusiastic leaps and bucks when in her paddock. Lateral work and circles help too. Her legs are congenital - cause no pain and were not caused by injury. In the summer they improve hugely and then she probably could have the 'walk' days off when she's able to go out.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun. 19, 2005
    Location
    Poulsbo, WA
    Posts
    1,617

    Default

    Is it possible for you to build a larger paddock or a racetrack? This way, it will allow your horse to exercise whenever he wants to.

    My Arab is also very sensitive to sugar in grass so I'm going to make a racetrack on our property - it will be about ten feet wide going around my farm so Abby will have to walk alot to look for whatever grass she can find. If it does not work, then I will put her in a large dry lot during the day and let her out in the race track during the night.

    One of our horses' hocks were very stiff when he first came here but is now able to move more freely out in our large pasture...so moving around all the time like they're supposed to is works wonder on his body.
    Will get a dream horse!
    More riding, swimming, and rowing, less posting



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar. 2, 2008
    Posts
    14

    Default

    I wish! I board my horse and this is the only place I could find that would even let us have a little paddock! Anywhere else and she would have had to be stalled 24/7. I just need a pay rise - and some cheap land!



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec. 11, 2003
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    1,186

    Default

    I think your schedule is fine - what do you on day 7?

    Once you start doing 25 milers, try and give a day off before and a day off after (or a short restful stretch on those two days). Have fun!



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar. 18, 2008
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    1,108

    Default

    Your schedule looks like too much work. Just ride the horse, have fun, do anything that strickes your fancy and have fun just spending time on her back.
    I believe it is about time spent on her back rather then the training schedule.
    A 25 miler is usually limited to 4 hours minimum. It is easy to cover the distance in that time with almost any horse. Don't worry too much.
    Get out, spend hours on the horse having fun.
    If you only ride 1 hour every day it never gets the horse ready for 4 hours. Spend longer times and ride as often or whenever it pleases you.
    I average 50 miles each week just having fun, don't worry about training, just go out and ride.
    A good working trot is 8 mph so judge distance traveled by time at a trot.
    I find a lope is only 9 mph and easier on me so I spend alot of time at a easy laid back lope.
    Again I too was worried about my first 25 and found it far easier then I thought.
    Have fun.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb. 26, 2008
    Posts
    807

    Default this might work

    I see your situation. You really would not have to ride as hard as you are proposing to get a horse who is so game ready for the event physically.

    Given her restrictions, I would consider as much walk and uphill slow work as possible, not a huge fan of lots of jumping and circles for distance training - wears out a horse's body too much. Horses are meant to walk and eat, with naps in-between. If she has limited turnout, I would try to walk her LOTS. Vary arena routines - maybe work on a slow jog or collection one day, jump another, etc. Galloping/fast canter 20m circles for an hour is not a good way to build muscles or wind, too much joint strain, IMO.

    Best of luck this summer.



Similar Threads

  1. iPhone app- training schedule?
    By Samantha37 in forum Eventing
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: Jul. 25, 2012, 05:17 PM
  2. Training schedule
    By maggie32 in forum Eventing
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: Oct. 13, 2011, 08:34 PM
  3. Interval Training Schedule
    By DukesMom in forum Eventing
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: Oct. 6, 2010, 04:36 PM
  4. WEF schedule
    By thebp in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: Nov. 11, 2009, 08:59 PM
  5. Young horse training schedule?
    By ASBnTX in forum Off Course
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: Nov. 19, 2008, 01:59 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness