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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov. 16, 2004
    Location
    Bucks County, PA
    Posts
    527

    Default Wanted FeLV positive kitten (PA)

    I have a healthy FeLV positive cat. We would like another kitten. They always say to test kittens so what happens to the ones that test positive? I'll take one!
    I don't like long hair cats and I want a male.

    I have tried a rescue and they said no to me because I let my cats outside. I guess I could have lied but I am not that kind of person. I live on 10 acres away from neighbors and the road. I will not spend my life yelling at the kids to keep the door closed and don't let the cat out. I garden alot and the cats help me in garden - that is where the catnip is too.

    I don't want to go too far maybe in Bucks/Montgomery county PA? Or just over the river in NJ. I know it is not kitten season yet but just keep me in mind.

    Thanks.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug. 28, 2007
    Location
    Triangle Area, NC
    Posts
    6,714

    Default

    i suggest you post your questions on www.thecatsite.com
    www.destinationconsensusequus.com
    chaque pas est fait ensemble



  3. #3
    Join Date
    May. 17, 2006
    Location
    bucks county
    Posts
    1,294

    Default

    what do you mean by FeLV?
    "to each his own..."

    just a horse obsessed girl who finds blogging way more fun than being an adult...
    http://equinerainman274.wordpress.com/



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun. 27, 2007
    Location
    ohio
    Posts
    1,089

    Default

    i believe its feline luekemia (sp)
    MIDWAY SOCCER 08' First Season!!!!!!



  5. #5
    Join Date
    May. 4, 2006
    Location
    Seabeck - the soggy peninsula
    Posts
    3,540

    Default

    I would suggest that you also contact your local cat rescues and put an ad out on Craigslist near your city. You should find someone who is positively delighted to find a home for an FeLV positive kitty. Another suggestion is to call the local vets and tell them what you are looking for,since they do the tests and probably often are asked to euthanize when they are positive.
    "When written in Chinese, the word "crisis" is composed of two characters, one represents danger, the other represents opportunity."

    John F Kennedy



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec. 30, 2003
    Posts
    390

    Default

    I'm hoping I have mis-interpreted your post.

    Are you saying that you let your Fe-Leuk positive cat outside, and will let another positive cat outside as well? Thus exposing all the cats in your neighborhood to this eventually fatal disease?

    Really hoping I read that wrong...



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug. 22, 2001
    Location
    Almost Aiken
    Posts
    2,711

    Default

    That's the way I read it too.

    Very irresponsible if it's true. Cats have a BIG range, so even if yours don't wander far from home, that doesn't mean that other cats aren't coming to your property, and running the risk of infection, and then possibly passing that infection all over the neighborhood.

    Wanting to take another FeLV cat is a very good idea, but letting them out is not. I have 9 cats, 7 of which are indoor only. It's not that hard to keep them in.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec. 21, 2005
    Location
    Cascade Foothills
    Posts
    2,360

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by saje View Post
    That's the way I read it too.

    Very irresponsible if it's true. Cats have a BIG range, so even if yours don't wander far from home, that doesn't mean that other cats aren't coming to your property, and running the risk of infection, and then possibly passing that infection all over the neighborhood.

    Wanting to take another FeLV cat is a very good idea, but letting them out is not. I have 9 cats, 7 of which are indoor only. It's not that hard to keep them in.
    Our indoor/outdoor hunter kitty learned to happily stay indoors when we decided he'd been in one scrap too many. Add me to the crowd that says keep contagion at bay by keeping the kitties in!
    My ears hear a symphony of two mules, trains, and rain. The best is always yet to come, that's what they explained to me. —Bob Dylan

    Fenway Bartholomule ♥ Arrietty G. Teaspoon Brays Of Our Lives



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb. 3, 2000
    Location
    Nokesville, VA
    Posts
    35,223

    Default

    Without getting into the issue of letting a FeLeuk positive cat out- let your local small animal vet know that you are willing to take a FeLeuk positive kitten that would otherwise be euthanized.
    Janet

    chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle and Tiara. Someone else is now feeding and mucking for Chief and Brain (both foxhunting now).



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2005
    Location
    Silver Spring, MD
    Posts
    587

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Alice View Post
    I'm hoping I have mis-interpreted your post.

    Are you saying that you let your Fe-Leuk positive cat outside, and will let another positive cat outside as well? Thus exposing all the cats in your neighborhood to this eventually fatal disease?

    Really hoping I read that wrong...
    I read the same thing, and it really bugged me



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar. 9, 2001
    Posts
    1,261

    Default

    Kudos to you for wanting to give another cat a home, but by allowing them outside you will significantly shorten their lives.

    FeLV weakens the immune system, so things like a snotty nose that wouldn't cause many problems in healthy cats can turn into big problems with positive cats.

    I will not spend my life yelling at the kids to keep the door closed and don't let the cat out.
    I believe the majority of FeLV+ cats die within 2-3 years, and I'd be willing to guess it's even shorter for those allowed outside.

    And as others have mentioned, by letting an infected cat outside you are putting other cats at risk of contracting the virus.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb. 3, 2000
    Location
    Nokesville, VA
    Posts
    35,223

    Default

    We just lost our two (indoor) FeLeuk positive cats within a couple of months this summer, aged 5 and 6.

    But some live into their teens.

    WRT indoor/outdoor. All my cats are now kept in for other reasons. But it appears that FeLeuk is endemic in this area- 2 of the 4 feral cats we have had tested were positive, so I doubt that I would be significantly adding to the risk if I DID allow a FeLeuk cat outside.

    Edited to add that I also have 4 non-FeLeuk indoor cats. Initially we attempted to keep them separate (which is why we got the second one from the vet to keep the feral one company), but after a year we let them mix- keeping all the others' innoculations up to date. We only separated them at feeding time.
    Janet

    chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle and Tiara. Someone else is now feeding and mucking for Chief and Brain (both foxhunting now).



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov. 16, 2004
    Location
    Bucks County, PA
    Posts
    527

    Default

    Sheesh I just went away for a few days and a debate sprang up while I was gone.

    About letting FeLV positive cats out that may cause more infections. If I had other neighbors (and they are pretty far away) with cats I might worry about that but I know them and they don't. If a feral cat gets infected I don't care. I love animals but the environment has enough problems without adding feral animals in the mix. Also my current cat who is positive will no longer go near other cats.

    About shortening their lifespan. I think it is a quality versus quantity issue. In my life I go for quality. I would think horse people would understand this the best. Riding or just working around horses has its inherent risks and yet it is the life I choose. I let my cats choose, I neither force my cats in nor out. I have another cat that will be 17 (leuk neg) who was a barn cat her whole life. This winter she said I'm moving in and hasn't left the house in months. (stinkin' crazy old bat, she beats up the dog and terrorizes the other cat)

    A quick browse around the internet does give short estimates for living with FeLV. But my Vet said they could live into their teens. And I have heard from many others who have had that experience.

    Thanks to the others for ideas where to find a kitty. Just thought I would try here and keep me in mind (if you are not philosophically opposed!).



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan. 30, 2008
    Posts
    961

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Flying Hippotamus View Post
    Sheesh I just went away for a few days and a debate sprang up while I was gone.

    About letting FeLV positive cats out that may cause more infections. If I had other neighbors (and they are pretty far away) with cats I might worry about that but I know them and they don't. If a feral cat gets infected I don't care. I love animals but the environment has enough problems without adding feral animals in the mix. Also my current cat who is positive will no longer go near other cats.

    About shortening their lifespan. I think it is a quality versus quantity issue. In my life I go for quality. I would think horse people would understand this the best. Riding or just working around horses has its inherent risks and yet it is the life I choose. I let my cats choose, I neither force my cats in nor out. I have another cat that will be 17 (leuk neg) who was a barn cat her whole life. This winter she said I'm moving in and hasn't left the house in months. (stinkin' crazy old bat, she beats up the dog and terrorizes the other cat)

    A quick browse around the internet does give short estimates for living with FeLV. But my Vet said they could live into their teens. And I have heard from many others who have had that experience.

    Thanks to the others for ideas where to find a kitty. Just thought I would try here and keep me in mind (if you are not philosophically opposed!).
    Not sure how to take your post, if a feral cat gets infected, you don't care. Nice attitude. If you love animals so much, with all the healthy animals out there waiting to be adopted out and a loving home, wouldn't it be better to euthenize a FeLV positive animal? Why let it become sick? And most importantly, do you have the time, funds, and all to properly take care of that animal when and if it gets sick?

    I worked in rescue and it is amazing what people will do, all in the name of "loving" an animal. Maybe rethink what your doing.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov. 16, 2004
    Location
    Bucks County, PA
    Posts
    527

    Default

    "I worked in rescue and it is amazing what people will do, all in the name of "loving" an animal. Maybe rethink what your doing. "

    That's funny - when I was looking to adopt the cat who is now 17, I went to a local rescue. They wouldn't give me one because I wanted mostly a barn cat. After all she loved her cats too much let them go outside. I couldn't help but laugh when a year or 2 later she was arrested for animal cruelty. She had way too many cats, not enough food, the cages, the smell...you get the picture.

    What I meant was a feral cat is unloved and an environmental hazard. They should be euthanized - if you can catch them.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Oct. 6, 2002
    Location
    Philadelphia PA
    Posts
    16,161

    Default

    My 4 year old cousin would like to run in the street, stick a fork in the electrical socket, and eat rocks. I am sure she would think this "quality" of life is better than overall "quantity." However, she is not responsible enough to know better and her mother is her steward-- so for her own safetly and well being, she is not allowed to run in the street, electrocute herself, or eat rocks.

    I see animals the same way. Your cats would love to run into the road, drink antifreeze, and run around in the woods where they can be attacked by any number of predators. You took responsibility for them, it is your job to be their steward and do what's right. Even if it's not necessarily what they might enjoy in any particular moment. That is especially true of a cat with a weakened immune system who is especially at risk from every bug that might not be fatal to a healthy cat.

    No responsible rescue is going to give you a FLK positive cat if you tell them you're going to let the cat outside. They don't want to contribute to spreading a deadly and painful disease. So you're either going to have to lie or find an irresponsible source. I'm not going to suggest you do either.

    FLK is endemic because people let FLK cats outside and/or don't take their cats to the vet and discover the FLK. I don't know how much more simple of a concept it could be?! You cat has a huge range of travel, whether you know it or not. You can't say for certain what other cats your cat will interact with. It's not simple enough to say "I'm not spreading it." If your cats spreads it to a feral cat, who then goes and spreads it to someone else's 12 cats-- are you going to say you didn't contribute to the spread because your cat wasn't the direct vector!?
    ~Veronica
    "The Son Dee Times" "Sustained" "Somerset" "Franklin Square"
    http://photobucket.com/albums/y192/vxf111/



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Feb. 10, 2006
    Location
    Darlington, MD
    Posts
    157

    Default

    Flying Hippotamus - do you have contact information not on this board? I'd like to talk with you if possible (nothing bad, I promise). If you could email me at matislia@yahoo.com, I would greatly appreciate it.

    Thanks!



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Oct. 6, 2002
    Location
    Philadelphia PA
    Posts
    16,161

    Default

    Honestly, I can't stop you from doing what you're going to do-- but I hope maybe I can give you a little something to consider that might make you re-think the way you're handling things. My post was meant in a positive light, it wasn't meant as an attack. Just food for thought.
    ~Veronica
    "The Son Dee Times" "Sustained" "Somerset" "Franklin Square"
    http://photobucket.com/albums/y192/vxf111/



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Apr. 3, 2004
    Location
    Leonard MI USA
    Posts
    191

    Default

    I have all the cats that come around here tested and if they are positive, they get euthanized. They fight, breed and spread it no matter what. I have indoor/outdoor cats that are vaccinated, but, I am still taking a risk. My cats don't go far, but you can't control the other cats that come on your property. It is so sad when it's in an area. I would try to keep the cats and kittens that I've found for barn cats, but they would end up positive. Please consider keeping your positive kitty indoors!
    Jennifer Kobylarz



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Nov. 15, 2004
    Location
    Upstate New York
    Posts
    59

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Flying Hippotamus View Post
    "I worked in rescue and it is amazing what people will do, all in the name of "loving" an animal. Maybe rethink what your doing. "

    That's funny - when I was looking to adopt the cat who is now 17, I went to a local rescue. They wouldn't give me one because I wanted mostly a barn cat. After all she loved her cats too much let them go outside. I couldn't help but laugh when a year or 2 later she was arrested for animal cruelty. She had way too many cats, not enough food, the cages, the smell...you get the picture.

    What I meant was a feral cat is unloved and an environmental hazard. They should be euthanized - if you can catch them.
    I agree with the shelter issue of overcrowing and their attitude about not adopting out unless you agree to keep your cat indoors. I have one indoor cat but also 3 barn cats...We've tried to adopt from our smelly overcrowded disgusting rescues and have gotten the same response...
    I also have to agree with the stance that feral cats are an environmental hazard.



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