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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec. 1, 2007
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    Gettysburg, PA
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    Default Club foot

    I have an offer of a beautiful WB mare but (isn't there always a but) she has a slight club foot. Great mover and causes no problem for her, but I'm worried about the inheritability of it, so I am thinking of passing, but I'ld like opinions before I close the door
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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct. 17, 2007
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    Vancouver, British Columbia
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    IF your using her for breeding, I wouldn't do it. Riding, sure, breeding, no. I pass on lovely young prospects due to clubby or other foot problems. JMO.



  3. #3
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    Mar. 10, 2004
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    IA
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    Default

    Was it something she was born w/ or did it result due to injury as a youngster? I'm guessing she's not had any foals to know if she passes this on, hence the question?
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  4. #4
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    Dec. 1, 2007
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by amdfarm View Post
    Was it something she was born w/ or did it result due to injury as a youngster? I'm guessing she's not had any foals to know if she passes this on, hence the question?
    Correct no foals and has had it all of her life that we know of
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  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov. 12, 2006
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    North East
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    Default

    if result of injury as a foal i would breed her if inherited i would not breed her
    for riding and showing it would not bother me at all



  6. #6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by vanheimrhorses View Post
    if result of injury as a foal i would breed her if inherited i would not breed herfor riding and showing it would not bother me at all
    Agreed! This is a very sensitive subject with me and I have learned about club feet the hard way. Unfortunately there are alot of people ( breeders/agents/trainers) out there who can get a good blacksmith and even some surgery ( check ligament or something ) to cover up this condition that in my opinion is passed on either from Daddy or Mommy. But... it all comes out in the end... sooner or later.
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  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun. 18, 2004
    Location
    Calgary, Alberta
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    Default

    I have a mare with a club foot, with managment she has bee nfine. but I am wondering why others have said they have no worries about a mare showing or riding with one



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
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    Default

    You really have to define "slight club foot" here. Many "club" feet are a product of how the horse grazes on a regular basis and compounded by a farrier/trimmer thinking "oh, that's just how the foot is" and never try to correct it.
    ______________________________
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  9. #9
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    Oct. 29, 1999
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JB View Post
    You really have to define "slight club foot" here. Many "club" feet are a product of how the horse grazes on a regular basis and compounded by a farrier/trimmer thinking "oh, that's just how the foot is" and never try to correct it.
    Absolutely agree!



  10. #10
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    Oct. 29, 1999
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    If she is the Hanoverian mare I am thinking of, I would take a chance on her.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct. 17, 2007
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    Vancouver, British Columbia
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by trilogy View Post
    I have a mare with a club foot, with managment she has bee nfine. but I am wondering why others have said they have no worries about a mare showing or riding with one
    Because I also have a gelding with a clubby foot, and it has not been a problem at all. However, I'm not preparing for the world cup either.

    On the other hand, I know breeders are aiming to breed something that could possibly be at the top of their game in whatever discipline, and I would not buy a baby with a club foot as a high end prospect.



  12. #12
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    Sep. 15, 2001
    Location
    Queen Creek, Arizona, USA
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    Default

    Been there, done that. Ended up with a horse with club feet. I even called the breeder, a well known, respected horseperson before breeding. She told me that she was born normal and sold when a yearling, returned as a two year old destroyed. Anyway, I went and looked at other foals (3) by her and they were normal. Mine was not. Is it genetic?, yes. But I do believe the tendancy can be managed if caught early. I personally would not breed a club footed horse again.



  13. #13
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    Jan. 21, 2003
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    Charles Town, WV
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    I went and looked at other foals (3) by her and they were normal. Mine was not. Is it genetic?, yes.
    If you went and looked at other foals and they were all normal, why on earth would you assume it is genetic with yours? The breeder described poor care and handling.

    There is a HUGE difference, as JB noted in a 'real' club foot and a 'clubby foot'. The only way to know for sure if it is a 'real' club foot is by x-ray. If you like the mare, have a PPE done and ask the vet if there is truly rotation in the foot and therefore 'real' clubbing. Otherwise it is just a slightly different shaped foot and probably no cause for alarm.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug. 13, 2002
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    Suffolk, VA
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tiki View Post
    There is a HUGE difference, as JB noted in a 'real' club foot and a 'clubby foot'. The only way to know for sure if it is a 'real' club foot is by x-ray. If you like the mare, have a PPE done and ask the vet if there is truly rotation in the foot and therefore 'real' clubbing. Otherwise it is just a slightly different shaped foot and probably no cause for alarm.

    I agree. I have often heard that the other side of the pond thinks that our obsession with upright feet is ridiculous.

    Again, if it is a true club I would not take the chance. If the foot is upright and a result of poor management or grazing then it would not be an issue.



  15. #15

    Default

    Well, this is a big sore point for me. I have a TB gelding, now 22 yrs old. he had a "clubby foot" when I got him, was supposed to be to incessant pawing on the cement or something.
    Fast forward to anytime you like.
    Fully xrayed, all angles inside the hoof are textbook perfect.
    This horse has been my lawn ornament since he is 9 yrs old, all due to that frickin foot.
    Shoes rip off, heel grows, no toe, back issues, you name it.
    He has even made it to "club foot clinics" with fancy farriers, who love to work on him, and lo and behold, problem remains.
    He has been barefoot for the last 13 years, is happy, clubby.
    Oh, and when I looked at pix of his sire, I could see the upright foot right there. ( and yes, that horse broke down as a two year old and was sent to India as a stud).
    That, and a mare with EPSM, sorry, been there as well, wont ever go there again.

    Two things we dont need to contribute to the gene pool.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jun. 13, 2003
    Location
    West Texas USA
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    Default

    I would like to know how you define a true club foot??



  17. #17
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    Jun. 4, 2002
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    Suffolk, VA
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    One of my client's mares... a QH...has one clubby and one normal foot. Both her foals by anArab (different stallions) have the exact same feet and one had quite a bad club foot when she got here. We've managed to correct it somewhat but it will always be very upright. I do believe that a true club foot is inherited...or at least the tendency to have one is as well as the tendency for a "grazing" foot. Certainly a good trimmer/farrier can help a great deal if the foal is trimmed from the beginning but none the less...the tendency to grow more upright on one than the other remains...grazing foot or whatever you call it.



  18. #18
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    Oct. 5, 2003
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    Oklahoma
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    Default

    http://barefoothoofcare.wordpress.co...-conformation/

    Quote Originally Posted by JB View Post
    You really have to define "slight club foot" here. Many "club" feet are a product of how the horse grazes on a regular basis and compounded by a farrier/trimmer thinking "oh, that's just how the foot is" and never try to correct it.
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  19. #19
    Join Date
    Oct. 29, 1999
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    Default

    I do believe that there are SOME club feet that are genetic. About 20 years ago, I had 2 Arab siblings here that both shared the same club foot. The stallion also had one, and a farrier said he saw the same foot on all of that stallion's offspring. He was a popular local stallion, so lots of opportunity to compare.

    One of my boarders has a mare that one foot looks uprite. She was bred to my stallion twice, and the foals have good, normal feet.

    One of the fillies that I bred developed that grazing foot several years after I sold her. She was boarded in my barn until 3, and I have many photos of her during that time with normal feet. Her mom has produced 8 foals, and all others were normal, but she is the only one that grazed with one foot always out, one always back. It did take years for the changes to be established in the foot. Her sire is an Olympic dressage horse with MANY offspring winning in hand, at inspections, and U/S. None of the ones I have seen have an uprite foot, and he is a VERY popular boy.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jan. 21, 2003
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    Charles Town, WV
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    CLUB FEET
    Club feet in horses is not uncommon and is best recognized and treated when the horse is still very young. It is a mechanical imbalance of the hoof in which the flexor structures of the limb pull the coffin bone apex (tip) downwards towards the sole of the hoof.This can result in subluxation of the coffin and pastern joints above as well as distortion of the hoof capsule into an excessively high-heeled, narrow, dished hoof. Club feet are often a cause of lamenessWith a thorough evaluation , radiographs to assess severity, and corrective trimming and shoeing, club feet can sometimes be well managed and even corrected.

    This is why you need x-rays to determine a true club foot vs an upright foot. There has to be rotation of the coffin bone to be a 'true' clue foot.



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