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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr. 8, 2005
    Location
    Kentucky
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    4,580

    Default Question for pony breeders

    Are Hackney ponies ever used for creating sport ponies? Many of them are very refined- I always say they're the true "miniature horse" because of that. I realize that many of them are very hot, and tend to have too much knee action, but not all. Just wondering if they are used at all to add refinement to a crossbred breeding program?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan. 21, 2003
    Location
    Charles Town, WV
    Posts
    6,637

    Default

    Not for the GRP registries that I know of. They're probably acceptable to American Sport Pony, but most ponies of pony size are.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul. 6, 2004
    Location
    The Redneck Riviera
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    3,919

    Default

    I have a small pony mare that while I don't know her breeding, I would hazard to guess that if she isn't 100% hackney, she is at least 1/2 (and I think she is full hackney).

    She was a jumper pony prior to me having her and she still jumps the moon (I've seen her clear 3' flat footed). I have bred her twice - one baby on the ground, and one inside her - for just that reason (sport ponies). The breeder I got her frm also bred her to his stallion for a sport pony.

    The pony that is by Impressionist is now a rising 4 or 5 year old and has started competing on the local hunter circut in AL. His owners report that he is a phenominal jumper, is around 14.1 hh (could be bigger by now, or not?? haven't heard from them for a year or so) and they state he has fantastic movement.

    The pony filly that I have (a late baby born in Sept so she just turned 2) is by a Conn stallion and has her sire's unusual coloring, mom's jump, and the dad added a little bone/substance and the Conn, "pluck". Movement is similar to mom's.

    I have her in foal (due late Feb) to my now gelded, TK stallion Emerald Impressions and anticipate a nice hunter baby from the cross. This will prob be the last time I breed her.

    I know that everyone that sees her (from other registries, judges, etc) want my pony mare and I have been asked by a couple of people that put on inspections for RPSI and ISR to have her inspected but she isn't elig due to her small size (11.3 hh). She is a fantastic mover (but you are right, lots of knee which for hunters isn't good) and very forward.
    Emerald Acres standing the ATA Approved Stallion, Tatendrang. Visit us at our Facebook Farm Page as well!



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct. 11, 2000
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    3,278

    Default

    My 3 yr old small pony is 1/2 hackney. The breeding program I got her from bred shetland crosses with their stallion and usually hackney mare, sometimes their arab. Most of my filly's siblings are driving ponies, but a one of her full sisters is a hunter pony.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    May. 12, 2001
    Location
    Kentucky bluegrass
    Posts
    1,248

    Default

    One of my most-complimented small ponies was a Connemara/Hackney Pony cross ... she was an outstanding jumper and wonderful with kids with a huge stride for her size. One of the best small pony broodmares I have is also a Connemara/HP cross and I'm crossing to warmblood-x with her.

    What I've tended to see is that the extreme knee and hock action in the purebreds seem to translate to length of stride and "roundness" in the crossbreds. The freedom of shoulder that allows them to get the extreme front end action will also help maintain warmblood/dressage type movement which requires a free shoulder. They also tend to be very powerful through the loin ... something again that is required for the extreme HP movement, but certainly works well to provide impulsion and power for jumping and dressage as well.

    Generally, the HP conformation seems to work well for dressage potential too ... they are usually quite uphill, tend to have good length of neck, especially for a pony, with a good neckset for a dressage frame and the ones I've had seem to be extremely sound, with good, strong joints.

    They do have the reputation for being hot and difficult but I have owned several HP mares over the years and have to say that I've certainly not found that to be true. They may handle leisure a little less placidly than some breeds ... I've found both the Connemaras and the Hackney Ponies to be more content if they have a job to do, but I've certainly not found them difficult.

    I am, in fact, trying to find a small enough HP stallion to breed to one of my bigger, coarser warmblood mares that tends to have flatter, more hunter-ish movement.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun. 1, 2005
    Location
    Floral City , Fl.
    Posts
    4,265

    Default

    Not sure how many know, but the lovely small paint pony (or is it pinto?) named Sam I AM who was 3rd or 4th at Pony Finals and sold to Kathy Cline for Amy, and went on to show and show was part hackney pony. The Hogans then bought him and he kept on showing.
    Sandy
    www.sugarbrook.com
    hunter/jumper ponies



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2006
    Posts
    82

    Default

    I had a hackney pony crossed with welsh. She was some jumper! A little quick in the trot. Good dressage prospect. Very nicely built. She looked a little fined boned until she finished growing and then filling out. Then she was gorgeous.
    If you cant convince them; confuse them



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 2005
    Posts
    1,228

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Sugarbrook View Post
    Not sure how many know, but the lovely small paint pony (or is it pinto?) named Sam I AM who was 3rd or 4th at Pony Finals and sold to Kathy Cline for Amy, and went on to show and show was part hackney pony. The Hogans then bought him and he kept on showing.

    Wow, I would have never guessed!
    Suerte Hostage Crisis Survivor!



  9. #9

    Default

    [QUOTE]
    Quote Originally Posted by Sportpony View Post
    Generally, the HP conformation seems to work well for dressage potential too ... they are usually quite uphill, tend to have good length of neck, especially for a pony, with a good neckset for a dressage frame and the ones I've had seem to be extremely sound, with good, strong joints.

    They do have the reputation for being hot and difficult but I have owned several HP mares over the years and have to say that I've certainly not found that to be true. They may handle leisure a little less placidly than some breeds ... I've found both the Connemaras and the Hackney Ponies to be more content if they have a job to do, but I've certainly not found them difficult.
    yes...you and I still live in and around the last Hackney strongholds...where they are still Hackneys and not "paperlessponieswhobreakrealhighsolet'scallthemHac kneys "

    the Richardsons in Lenior City TN would be the pest place to find out about a Hackney stallion for your mare...they don't stand any but would know where to find a nice one quickly....the best ones have an on/off switch that take them from half asleep to fire breathing in about one fine harness lap

    Tamara in TN
    Last edited by Tamara in TN; Dec. 27, 2007 at 02:11 PM.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    May. 12, 2001
    Location
    Kentucky bluegrass
    Posts
    1,248

    Default

    [QUOTE=Tamara in TN;2893799]

    ...the best ones have an on/off switch that take them from half asleep to fire breating in about one fine harness lap

    Tamara in TN
    That is the best description I've seen of the "disposition" I've experienced with the Hackney Ponies.

    I have a little mare that I got because she didn't get big enough to be competitive at the higher levels, though she was successfully shown as a yearling in hand. Easily managed but a lot of apparant "fire" in hand and in a relaxed pasture situation with other quiet ponies I've had absolutely no problems. Does absolutely everything she is asked to do quietly and sensibly.

    The few times she's taken exception to something she never goes to "flipping out" stages, just far enough to determine if the person at the other end of the lead rope is going to really insist.

    Very, very intelligent ... and extremely personable, as have all of the Hackney Ponies I've owned ... not huge numbers, but 5 or 6 over the years.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct. 27, 2005
    Location
    Southern N.J.
    Posts
    160

    Default question for pony breeders

    hahahaha....I think there may be more hackney pony broodmares out there than ppl realize. Hence the "unknown" mare when you look at some of the pony bloodlines at the sales. It boggles my mind that at some of the top sales the mare is listed as "unknown". As a SO, I can assure you I DO know exactly what kind of mare the semen I send is going into.
    Fox Ridge

    Champ. Welsh Lands End The Colonels Fox
    Fox Ridge Welsh ponies on fb



  12. #12
    Join Date
    May. 6, 1999
    Location
    Ocala, FL
    Posts
    10,451

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ponyjumper4 View Post
    My 3 yr old small pony is 1/2 hackney. The breeding program I got her from bred shetland crosses with their stallion and usually hackney mare, sometimes their arab. Most of my filly's siblings are driving ponies, but a one of her full sisters is a hunter pony.
    Painted Ponies Farm, right? Unique program putting out some unique ponies. Some exceptionally nice movers for any discipline--HUGE strides for their sizes. I also found it quite cool to watch how PH's kids could just hop on anything, halter and lead only, and canter it around.

    Isthatrt, now I'm gonna have to disagree with you! I'm sure there may be some hackney blood hidden by "unknowns" in pedigrees, but given how the head can come out (Painted Ponies did NOT have the unfortunate, occasional hackney "can head"), I wouldn't think that blood would be as common as, say, AQHA or Paint blood in the larger ponies with "unknown" in them--or just plain Shetland in the smaller ones.
    Sportponies Unlimited
    Athletic Thoroughbred crosses for the highly motivated, smaller rider.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct. 27, 2005
    Location
    Southern N.J.
    Posts
    160

    Default question for pony breeders

    pwynn, well, didn't state it was specifically hackneys in which the mare was "unknown", but think its alot of breeds like apps, morgans, standarbreds or other breeds not known for the hunter ring, that end up in the unknown catagory, hackneys among them. Sometimes those crosses work, sometimes they don't. Either way, it just seems like if the dam is one of those "off" breeds most ppl are reluctant to state exactly what the mare is, and would rather just use call them "unknow" jmho
    Fox Ridge

    Champ. Welsh Lands End The Colonels Fox
    Fox Ridge Welsh ponies on fb



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