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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan. 13, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    335

    Question Kacey has side bone ... NEW LINK 4 pics added- Update post 41!

    Well, I took my dearest Kacey to the vet yesterday after he freaked out on Sunday when he rolled and unbuckled his sheet, he swears it attacked him and he had to run for dear life. He ran up on the concrete by my barn and fell and slid into the corner of the barn leaving a nice big dent and several abraisons on all 4 legs.

    I had been thinking of taking him in since he just hasn't felt quite right in the front for months now. And I would have sooner, only after every bad spell, an abscess would pop up on the right front hoove and I would relay the abscess to the not quite right movement.
    So, the crash and burn into the barn incident sealed the deal for him.

    The vet found soreness in his pelvis and shoulder and his right hind and also on his front feet. Esp. the left fore. The feet thing surprised me since I have owned and raised Kacey from birth and have never known him to have any issues at all. So, we x-rayed him. And they found the most severe case of side bone the vet has ever seen. Caused by continual concussion on hard ground.

    As I said, Kacey has been mine from birth. I have done all of his training and care since day one. As of now, he is an eventer at training level. He is five, a 16.3 hand Irish sport horse. I pushed him fairly hard this past year to get him ready for YEH and we qualified at both novice and the YEH 5 year old division. He tries his heart out for me over fences and we are working on the dressage. At several shows, he felt not quite right, but was never lame, just a bit short in front and not using himself well. But, we came home, and days later, an abscess would pop out on his right fore.

    The farrier is coming out today to put pads on him and we are giong to go from there. My arena will be put in in about two weeks and I will NOT work him on the hard ground of my place anymore. We have been here right at a year. I was supposed to get an arena for Christmas last year... and then last March... and well, it will finally be in this month. However, the vet said that this condition did not happen in a year, but that it has been coming on for several years, more than likely. So, it was nothing that I did riding him here at home. He did grow up on hard soil though and played/plays really hard on his own.

    I guess what I want to know is... how have you delt with side bone? Were you able to continue to ride and compete as normal? At what level?

    That being said, I think we need a few jingles here too so that the shoing and other methods of "healing" that we try will be successful and that my good boy feels better soon.

    Thanks.

    Here is a link for pics of his feet that I took tonight. They are kind of at a funny angle, so I apologize. Thank you to any farriers before hand, for the help.
    This is the NEW link!
    http://community.webshots.com/album/561742278RrxfUn
    Last edited by kacey'srider; Dec. 23, 2007 at 11:15 AM. Reason: Update - post 41



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul. 13, 2006
    Posts
    2,445

    Default Sorry!

    I have never had a horse with sidebone keep going much further once the lameness was diagnosed . With him being so young and really not having that many miles yet to produce that sort of result I might look into retiring him to a light hacking horse. I know of a few older horses that went lower levels for another year or 2 but really hit or miss soundness wise. At his age it doesn't look good . I actually had to put my 14 year old down for advanced ring and side bone 2 years ago. Do you know if either parent had any issues with sidebone?



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct. 3, 2002
    Location
    it's not the edge of the earth, but you can see it from here
    Posts
    12,079

    Default

    My first horse came to me as a "12 yo" with side bone. You know, the way all unknown aged horses are "12."

    This was way back when dinosaurs roamed the earth, and the diagnosis was based on physically being able to see the issue.

    She lived on 1gm/bute/day and was sound most days. I did not jump her. She occasionally had a bad day, but it was rare. I was young and knew nada... relied on the barn owner for management, never had any sort of joint supplement or anything. She had pads, usually with pine-tar and oakum, but generally in summer with silicone. When I was competing (4-H round-and-round hunters, TL dressage) she had the softer rubber pads with 'heels.' I've no idea (now) what they are called, but they were a step up from the plain old leather or plastic pads.

    She would get extra bute before and after a show, hunter pace, judged trail ride etc.

    After I outgrew her, she went on to teach no less than two other young girls the facts of horsey life. She lived well into her 20's. Eventually she was put down because those front feet just stopped growing all together. She had gotten quite stiff in her old age--but she was WELL into her 20's.

    With all the management we have now, I can't imagine this is a death sentence. My old girl never went off her feed or showed other ulcer symptoms... and I wish I knew how to ride her RIGHT back then, because I'm sure taking more weight off her forehand would have helped her tremendously.

    I know this was a hundred years ago, and I knew so very little back then... but I did do one of my 4-H projects on "Ringbone, Sidebone & Navicular" to learn about the issues... she Did Good. I think there is hope.
    InnisFailte Pinto Sporthorses & Coloured Cobs
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Bits are like cats, what's one more? (Petstorejunkie)



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan. 1, 2005
    Posts
    1,015

    Default

    I have a young gelding with side bone too.. we manage it with concussion pads and heel support.. one gram of bute on riding days, only 4 days a week of hacking , NO JUMPING..
    He has lovely sound days, then there are days he just hurts ,, I respect him and he is put away.. Like yours this boy will do what ever I ask even in pain.. I just have to listen to him.. he is the horse in my profile ... great potential now just a hacking horse..

    good luck , I am thinking of putting him in the epona shoe this winter as I do take off pads when it gets really wet out.. He lives outside 24/7 as well..

    P~



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar. 9, 2007
    Posts
    87

    Default

    Your horse will be fine once you find what works!! I don't forget that..it might take a few different approaches until you find the right thing.

    My horse has navicular issues and extreme sidebones! He is totally sound right now and barefoot. What has worked for my guys is going barefoot, lowering the heals for frog contact. This will help cirulation int he feet to keep joint fluids producing correctly. There are also other options with shoes, but jsut keep that frog contact with something. Also, while switching from wedge shoes (for the nav) to barefoot he has had 2 rounds of Hyoloronic Acid shots into is coffin bone over this post year. This has heped A LOT! Most vets will tell you sidebone will not be the cause of your horse being lame, rather a "story" that tells why the horse is sore because of something else. It is just evidence of excessive concussion on the hooves. A lot of horses have this and most owners do not even know. Try HA injections into the coffin joints - I swear by it! I bet your horse will be just fine!



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan. 13, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    335

    Default

    I just had the farrier out and he put some pads on him called "horse trax." They are a full pad with a slightly cushier area in the middle. My trainer suggested a full pad right away to take Kacey off of as much concussion as possilbe. Let's cross our fingers.

    I would still like to hear more about what has worked for other horses. And maybe some success stories too.

    Thanks to all of the help so far.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov. 16, 2004
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Posts
    470

    Default

    When I was young-three decades ago--I had a wonderful amateur-owner jumper--with sidebones.
    He was a 16-hand, light framed TB.
    He never had a rail down and was champ or reserve at every A show. Ended up reserve national AHSA champ amateur owner jumper--just missed champ because we skipped Washington.
    We discovered the sidebones a few months after I bought him and showed him in the Classic at Tampa Stadium. He was lame the rest of that year.
    My mother, who could "fix" just about every soundness problem, worked for about six months that year getting his quite small hoofs to expand--to take pressure off the sidebones.
    He went on and showed the next year--the year he was reserve AHSA champ. Then we sold him to someone who knew he had sidebones and followed instructions.

    He definitely had leather pads because all our horses had them. We couldn't turn him out much because we didn't want him to run on hard ground.
    I'm hazy on the details of the treatment. I just remember keeping his coronet bands soft and able to expand. We probably poulticed the feet a lot, too.

    Bottom line: don't give up hope yet.
    The TB I have now has the small feet, too. I've never Xrayed him. But he hates hard ground. His blacksmith--the best--put natural balance shoes on him and heart pads, with the protrusion towards the ground. Underneath is house caulk, with a touch of Betadine for stiffness. The caulk stays soft the whole five weeks and looks like something in a running shoe when the shoe is taken off. This combination has expanded his feet, and hard ground is no longer a problem.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug. 31, 2004
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    4,345

    Default

    Mine has sidebones (you can see em) and the vet wasn't worried, nor has it ever caused problems. Go figure.
    -Grace



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan. 13, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    335

    Default

    Anyone?



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb. 11, 2007
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    45

    Smile

    Hi Kacey,
    According to my knowledge, shock wave therapy might help with side bone. Before you would believe me please ask a veterinarian about this.
    Good luck!



  11. #11
    Join Date
    May. 12, 2003
    Location
    Home of the Rock 'n Roll Burrito
    Posts
    4,807

    Default

    I dont' see any feedback on the photos. Has anyone looked at them? I was forced to create an account to get in and even so got a system error that won't allow me in.
    Visit my barefoot blog:
    http://barefoothoofcare.wordpress.com/
    "I don't mean to brag, I don't mean to boast, but I'm intercontinental when I eat French toast" ~ Beastie Boys



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2001
    Posts
    15,232

    Default

    I can't see the photos.

    My big horse has sidebone, has never had a problem with it-would have never known but was taking hoof x-rays.

    He has always been barefoot, no shoes or pads or anything.

    I know someone else locally that owns a horse with WICKED sidebone-it is like antlers growing out of his body! LOL!

    He is also barefoot and sound.

    Go figure.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan. 13, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    335

    Default

    There is a link to look at the pictures on the first post from me.

    You can barely see the side bones, and Kacey is so big boned that you wouldn't know they were there unless you looked at them. But, the point of the pictures was to see if there were any farriers out there who could help me with any shoing changes such as taking off some of the heel to create a little more angle and thus less concussion b/c of more angle on the pastern.

    That said, I have a great farrier who works well with my trainer, who is also a farrier, he just can't practice now due to a bad back. We are all planning on getting together the next time Kacey is shod to make sure things are like they should be.

    I am also thinking of adding some Magic Cushion under the pads.

    He has had three rounds of equi-lazer so far and it seems to be helping.

    I am wondering if the sidebones are not the cause of his lameness, but that he was just showing symptoms of soreness at the time of the vet lameness exam and that is what they found.
    Thanks everyone!



  14. #14
    Join Date
    May. 12, 2003
    Location
    Home of the Rock 'n Roll Burrito
    Posts
    4,807

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kacey'srider View Post
    There is a link to look at the pictures on the first post from me.
    It doesn't work.
    Last edited by Lookout; Dec. 11, 2007 at 05:52 PM.
    Visit my barefoot blog:
    http://barefoothoofcare.wordpress.com/
    "I don't mean to brag, I don't mean to boast, but I'm intercontinental when I eat French toast" ~ Beastie Boys



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan. 5, 2006
    Location
    Atlanta
    Posts
    5,053

    Default

    Hi there-- I got the link to the photos and logged into Walmart's photo site but it keeps displaying an error message! Could you try again? If Walmart keeps acting up you could try flickr or webshots.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2002
    Location
    Azle, Teh-has
    Posts
    7,714

    Default

    hey Kacey's Rider.

    go to photobucket.com

    create a log in. It's free.

    Upload the photos. Photobucket will give each photo an HTTP address and you can post those. We can go right to the link. easy cheesy.

    (though my photobucket has been on crack lately and posting teeny pictures. argg.)
    http://kaboomeventing.com/
    http://kaboomeventing.blogspot.com/
    Horses are amazing athletes and make no mistake -- they are the stars of the show!



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Nov. 5, 2007
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    1,238

    Default

    Sidebone is the calcification of the lateral cartilages. It is a natural part of the aging process of a horse. For those of you who discovered it on x-ray after your horses got some years on them that's why. Is very common in Draught breeds as well. Is not normally a problem.

    Now, occasionally for some odd reason a horse will get premature calcification. This is a problem. Horse gets real lame and is a handful to shoe or trim because is quite painful.

    What do we do? I see a lot of you like using pads. I don't think they make a hill of beans worth of difference one way or the other but if it makes you feel better go ahead and use them.

    Best shoe to use for this is a half round. They tend to get pretty hard on shoes also so don't count on any resets. Due to the goofy way they land and breakover you'll see some real funky wear patterns as well.

    With half rounds the horse can be used (in combination with whatever the vet prescribes) I've seen no other shoe work as good.
    George



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jan. 13, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    335

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JHUshoer20 View Post
    Sidebone is the calcification of the lateral cartilages. It is a natural part of the aging process of a horse. For those of you who discovered it on x-ray after your horses got some years on them that's why. Is very common in Draught breeds as well. Is not normally a problem.

    Now, occasionally for some odd reason a horse will get premature calcification. This is a problem. Horse gets real lame and is a handful to shoe or trim because is quite painful.

    What do we do? I see a lot of you like using pads. I don't think they make a hill of beans worth of difference one way or the other but if it makes you feel better go ahead and use them.

    Best shoe to use for this is a half round. They tend to get pretty hard on shoes also so don't count on any resets. Due to the goofy way they land and breakover you'll see some real funky wear patterns as well.

    With half rounds the horse can be used (in combination with whatever the vet prescribes) I've seen no other shoe work as good.
    George

    Thank you, George. I am working on getting the pictures up again.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Feb. 17, 2004
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    1,953

    Default Well I can see the photos and...

    I'm sorry to say that I'm very dissappointed that your vet didn't mention that your horse has wicked high heels.

    This is why I mostly lurk now as I can't stand the complete ignorance of a healthy foot by "professionals".

    OP:

    I'm not trying to make you feel bad, but getting a good trim under those shoes would be a BIG BIG start towards returning your horse to soundness.

    The heels are too high and the toe is too long.

    To learn more about healthy feet whether shod or barefoot I have to send you to barefoot sites.

    www.ironfreehoof.com
    www.hoofrehab.com
    www.barefoothorse.com
    www.healthyhoof.com

    I don't care if you stay shod or not, at least get a better trim.

    Sheesh, your horse doesn't have side bone from hard ground he has it from poor hoof mechanics!

    Regards,



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jun. 19, 2005
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    263

    Default

    I agree with Kim heels too high toe too long.

    And with george re leverage reduction by use of half round stock that will allow the horse to turnover medially and laterally without causing further strain to the collateral (on the side) structures. Once can also provide the leverage reduction by using a grinder to modify a tall aluminum shoe or purchase a premade leverage reduction shoe.
    George Spear
    CNBBT, CNBF, CLS
    www.NBhoofcare.com



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