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  1. #1
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    Aug. 5, 2006
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    Default RFD..Chris Cox "The Soured Dressage Horse" series

    For all who get RFD...Chris Cox is starting a 4 part series working with a soured Grand Prix Dressage horse who has started rearing and bucking going from the warm up arena to the competition arena. (and no, Chris Cox isn't a dressage basher )

    Should be interesting. I really enjoy watching Chris Cox's show..I think he is one of the best "cowboy" types.

    This week he is starting with ground work.

    Just an FYI if anyone is interested in watching.



  2. #2
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    Sep. 6, 2007
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    San Diego
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    Default

    I'm looking forward to watching this. I'm glad to see more dressage things on. I watched Clinton Anderson interview Ali Brock the other day. She rode some gorgeous horses, so gorgeous that Clinton didn't bother me as much as usual.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    May. 25, 2004
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    Bend, Oregon
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    59

    Default

    So when does this start??



    www.europferde.com



  4. #4
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    Mar. 27, 2001
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    Between the Medina River and a hay field
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    9,894

    Default

    No thanks! *rolling eyes*
    www.spindletopfarm.net
    Home of Puerto D'Azur - 1998 NA 100 Day Test Champion
    "Charcter is much easier kept than recovered"



  5. #5
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    Dec. 4, 2002
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    Default

    I suspect the GP horse simply isn't getting enough peeps. Easy fix!
    www.specialhorses.org
    a 501(c)3 organization helping 501(c)3 equine rescues




  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul. 17, 2007
    Location
    Landrum, SC
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    1,802

    Thumbs up Cowboy vs Warmblood

    I saw Part One last night. Every time I see a trainer twirl a lead rope, step in and disengage the hindquarters on a stock-type, I always wish I could see them work with a big-a@@ warmblood... voila!

    The horse is large marge in charge and knows it and poor Chris earned his pennies getting towed around in the sand now and then. The progress was slower than what is usually achieved with a less phlegmatic breed, but progress was made. But definitely not the usual "okay... puff, puff, puff... I give up... I'll follow you anywhere" submission you see on most of these programs.

    At the end of the session, he said the cameras will be rolling for ALL of the work with the horse, so it will be a real-time look at the process. It'll be really interesting to see if he gets on. This horse (as seen in the introduction) is pretty unhappy about going down centerline.
    Athletic Horses. Educated Riders.
    www.Ride-With-Confidence.com



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun. 9, 2003
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    5,506

    Default

    I saw some of the Alli Brock work, but didn't like the way her horse went -- I thought he looked very restrained until he did some extended trot. His regular trot and canter looked very cramped without any freedom of movement or expression. Lovely horse, (the dark bay), but ... I don't know, not very happy -- any other thoughts?
    PennyG



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec. 27, 2006
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    90

    Default

    The horse could be in pain.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b5TdgH5XNTk



  9. #9

    Default

    You're correct, I find it all the time! 90% of the time 'attitude problems' are simply pain! Fix the problem, the attitude will correct itself. I rehab and massage horses, and I cannot tell you how many times I've found horses sore/out of alignment with people riding them that way! I hope Chris looks at that possibility first!



  10. #10
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    Dec. 4, 2002
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    Dungeon of the Ivory Tower
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    Default

    I ditto this. It's amazing that it turned out to be not so much, "My horse is crooked" but which came first - my crookedness, or his?
    www.specialhorses.org
    a 501(c)3 organization helping 501(c)3 equine rescues




  11. #11

    Default

    ABSOLUTELY! Many times I worked on horses several times, just to find that they are not getting better, then I look at the client, and find they are not 'standing square'. That's when I figure it's time to fix them instead!



  12. #12
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    Aug. 5, 2006
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    Pain is absolutely a possibility....BUT, I have known horses with pure attitude...and we're talking horses who are chiro, massaged, good farrier, etc....sometimes the lack of forwardness is between the ears.

    I love Chris Cox's show...I think he does a great job of explaining why he does what he does.

    There are those horses out there who do need someone like him to get them going again.



  13. #13
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    Aug. 5, 2006
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    Default

    Euro...go to www.rfdtv.com and look over the guide. The first show aired this week, but they replay it several times.

    STF...no need to roll eyes, I merely posted as some folks may have an interest...not imperative that anyone share their disgust..LOL!

    I'm certainly no fan of Parelli, but I think Chris has some things to offer, especially if one gets in a situation with a balky/stubborn horse.

    Sounds like everyone who has watched the show/posted...liked it as well.
    Last edited by dalpal; Nov. 7, 2007 at 06:35 PM.



  14. #14

    Default

    BUT, I have known horses with pure attitude...and we're talking horses who are chiro, massaged, good farrier, etc....sometimes the lack of forwardness is between the ears
    Yes, that's why I said '90% of the time' And that is why I will tell the trainer if I don't find any problems! Which is rare (about 10% of the time)



  15. #15
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    Sep. 6, 2007
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    San Diego
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Melissa.Hare.Jones View Post
    I saw Part One last night. Every time I see a trainer twirl a lead rope, step in and disengage the hindquarters on a stock-type, I always wish I could see them work with a big-a@@ warmblood... voila!

    The horse is large marge in charge and knows it and poor Chris earned his pennies getting towed around in the sand now and then. The progress was slower than what is usually achieved with a less phlegmatic breed, but progress was made. But definitely not the usual "okay... puff, puff, puff... I give up... I'll follow you anywhere" submission you see on most of these programs.

    At the end of the session, he said the cameras will be rolling for ALL of the work with the horse, so it will be a real-time look at the process. It'll be really interesting to see if he gets on. This horse (as seen in the introduction) is pretty unhappy about going down centerline.
    Oh yes, me too! My barn friend lent me a set of her Clinton Anderson dvds. My three year old is big warmblood and she can be a bit of a bully. None of the horses that Clinton worked with seemed all that challenging. As you say, it was a little resistance and then meek and mild. That definitely is not the experience I was having with my horse. So yes it is very interesting to see one of these guys work with a big warmblood. This horse that Chris Cox is working with is 17+ hands.

    I watched the first episode. I admit I really did not get the purpose of it. Was he trying to establish dominance? I don't see the point of making him go back and forth on a lead rope. I suppose he's trying to establish a fear and respect for him? That horse was terrified. He was visibly shaking. But he has been a big bully and probably begining to become dangerous. I'm not condemning or criticizing, just not sure of what that exercise accomplishes. Feel free to enlighten me!

    I do enjoy all equine related television though. I wish there was more on.



  16. #16
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    Yes, it was all about this horse finally submitting to a human being. Chris went right for the hindquarters because the horse's ammo was to go backwards and rear. Disengaging the hindquarters is an act of submission. As soon as the horse yeilded to him, he took the pressuer off.

    Horse was shaking, but as Chris said...this is an emotional type horse.

    Watching that video of him rearing with his rider (ugly rearer), I think Chris wanted to get his point across to him immediately about who was in charge.



  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by dalpal View Post
    Yes, it was all about this horse finally submitting to a human being. Chris went right for the hindquarters because the horse's ammo was to go backwards and rear. Disengaging the hindquarters is an act of submission. As soon as the horse yeilded to him, he took the pressuer off.

    Horse was shaking, but as Chris said...this is an emotional type horse.

    Watching that video of him rearing with his rider (ugly rearer), I think Chris wanted to get his point across to him immediately about who was in charge.
    I bet that big horse has never had anyone stand up to him, the way he got so upset over it. Chris mentioned something about him being a bad loader. I would love to see how he works that issue out. I don't normally get this channel, but I'm housesitting right now. The owners have every channel under the sun. Hopefully they'll be gone long enough for me to see more episodes!



  18. #18
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    Apr. 17, 2002
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    Chris is the real deal. Glad to know he's getting a chance at a tougher horse. I've no doubt he can manage Pooky the monster pone



  19. #19
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    May. 5, 2002
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    To me it looked like the horse was shaking from fatigue. He might be in good shape for schooling dressage, but the excercises Chris was putting him through are probably using a whole different set of muscles. He also looked a little over at the knee, and seemed like his leg was buckling a little, again possibly from fatigue.

    I like Chris the best of all the RFD trainers. If you watch the beginning where he is riding his roan horse, the horse is moving very nicely and correctly collected, round, and reaching. Not behind the contact like Clintons horses.



  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by BabyGoose View Post
    To me it looked like the horse was shaking from fatigue. He might be in good shape for schooling dressage, but the excercises Chris was putting him through are probably using a whole different set of muscles. He also looked a little over at the knee, and seemed like his leg was buckling a little, again possibly from fatigue.

    I like Chris the best of all the RFD trainers. If you watch the beginning where he is riding his roan horse, the horse is moving very nicely and correctly collected, round, and reaching. Not behind the contact like Clintons horses.

    NO kidding, that is a nice little quarter horse and Chris rides him beautifully. If I remember correctly, Chris does have some hunter/jumper background from Australia. He said once on the show that he does some dressage work with that little roan horse.

    I have a soft spot for Chris because I think he is quite lovely .



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