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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct. 31, 2001
    Location
    West of insanity, east of apathy, deep in the heart of Texas.
    Posts
    15,797

    Cool Competition-legal remedy for a sore back? HELP!UPDATE - it wasn't her back..........

    So I take my training mare to her first recognized show this weekend. I school her this afternoon in the bridle I've used for the 7 months I've had her, in the saddle I've used for the 7 months I've had her. Both fit her beautifully yesterday, and she worked like a dream.

    The problem - we get going, and she's working like her usual amenable self. At first. But the longer we go, the p!$$ier she gets. I get off and longe her for a few, thinking she's just got her knickers in a twist. She flags her tail and floats around the circle, but is a bit tight in her back. I check the saddle, and it's ridden up onto her withers, and I was basically sitting on her withers/spine - something that's NEVER happened before.

    So, I rinse her down, cool her out, let her stretch and eat. I've got another saddle, and a half pad, that I can try before our classes tomorrow, but I'm really worried that she's tweaked something major because of this. Her withers are so sore that combing her mane out to braid it, made her flinch. And as my working student was leading her away (bless that girl - she's a gift from God!), I noticed that she wasn't keen on bringing her left hind up under her, and was walking unevenly. Just slightly, but I know this mare well enough that I could spot it.

    Any suggestions as to how I can make her more comfortable, and still be "legal" would be greatly appreciated.

    ETA - other issues surfaced during the course of the weekend. We were horrific on Saturday morning (50+% at TL2), better in the afternoon after a bit change (58%, with a bolt and a spook in the mix), even better this morning (62+% with problems in both canter transitions) and horrific again this afternoon (50% with lots of canter problems, and an attitude). News as it happens, film at 11.........................

    Thanks to all who offered suggestions.
    Last edited by ESG; Jun. 17, 2007 at 08:19 PM.
    In loving memory of Laura Jahnke.
    A life lived by example, done too soon.
    www.caringbridge.org/page/laurajahnke/



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun. 11, 2007
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    2,846

    Default

    Is B-L solution legal? I've never used it as I've always used Bute, up until like 12 hours before competition... otherwise some Yucca? I'm not entirely positive on what to suggest - except definately have the chiropracter/massage therapist take a look at her after the show.

    Good luck and I hope all goes well. I hope you can at least salvage a ride or two... cause it does stink having to withdraw from a show and lose those entry fees and all.
    Proud owner of Gus & Gringo.
    See G2's blog
    Photos



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan. 12, 2000
    Location
    Proud owner of one Lunar acre! (Campanus Crater, The Moon)
    Posts
    14,079

    Default

    I'd go the bute route, too. Just read the rules to make sure you have it right by weight, etc.
    "Relinquish your whip!!"



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct. 31, 2001
    Location
    West of insanity, east of apathy, deep in the heart of Texas.
    Posts
    15,797

    Default

    I double checked the rules this afternoon, before leaving for the show. I figured since she's doing two tests tomorrow (I hope ), and two tests Sunday, that she'd need a gram (1 gram per 1000 lbs is the legal dosage) Saturday night, and set up her feed accordingly. After this afternoon, I gave her that feed tonight, and will do the same tomorrow, if need be. I was thinking that there might be something topical I can do for her. Mineral ice? Liniment? Vodka? (just kidding) Or maybe, the vodka should be for me.......................
    In loving memory of Laura Jahnke.
    A life lived by example, done too soon.
    www.caringbridge.org/page/laurajahnke/



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug. 18, 2003
    Location
    Brenham, TX
    Posts
    4,860

    Default

    I think the vodka for you is in order. Hope all goes well tomorrow.
    Triple J Ranch Sporthorses
    www.triplejsporthorse.com
    Member - OMGiH I LOFF my mare(s) clique



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar. 9, 2006
    Posts
    1,085

    Default

    Some form of Robaxin is legal. Can't remember if it is the injectable or oral.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr. 20, 2007
    Posts
    61

    Cool

    ANY experienced competitor knows that you NEVER change tack, shoes, feed, ANYTHING prior to or during a competition. These issues are worked out during training WEEKS if not MONTHS before considering going to a show. If your training mare is suddenly THAT afflicted, she needs to see a vet immediantly. It is amazing how many excuses people come up with at the last minute.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep. 27, 2000
    Location
    Southern California - on a freeway someplace
    Posts
    9,753

    Default

    Robaxin is legal the night before, at least orally. You can use it w/bute.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2001
    Posts
    8,542

    Default

    There could be something else going on. It sux but I'd be ready to scratch on Saturday (depending on how she is) and later in the day try schooling her to see how she is before deciding about sunday. I would not use bute for something like that.

    Then again, she may be just fine tomorrow ( oops today, I guess).



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb. 23, 2005
    Location
    Spotsylvania, VA
    Posts
    13,221

    Default

    I would see if you could get her a massage or a visit from a chiro.
    I wasn't always a Smurf
    Penmerryl's Sophie RIDSH
    "I ain't as good as I once was but I'm as good once as I ever was"
    The ignore list is my friend. It takes 2 to argue.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec. 1, 2005
    Location
    FL
    Posts
    721

    Default

    You can use Robaxin...it's just not that much. I second the bute idea.

    Here's something you can do that provides temporary relief...

    You will need, two towels (people size)
    Hot water
    Epsom salts
    horse cooler

    1. soak first towel in hot water, lay across back where horse is sore
    2. sprinkle salts in a layer over sore areas, don't be stingy, be generous here
    3. soak second towel in hot water, lay over first towel
    4. lay cooler over towels to retain heat

    leave horse in crossties for 20 minutes...repeat after each ride

    finally...find a saddle fitter! Good luck



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan. 8, 2007
    Location
    Ithaca, NY
    Posts
    552

    Default

    Disclaimer: this is a bit harsh in tone, but this is a subject I feel very strongly about and have a fair amount of experience dealing with back sore horses.

    If you were that sore, would you want to compete? Probably not, so why make your horse go through with it. Dressage is about a nice supple, comfortable, submissive horse working well from behind, etc., etc. None of this really can be done properly or fairly to the horse when their back is sore. Not to mention what could happen to you if the problem continues to get worse and suddenly you find yourself hurled off your horse because you refused to listen to her complaints.

    Drugging is merely a way of covering something up UNLESS you know what the problem is and you are using medication to assist in, say, physical therapy for the horse. Example: a horse who has developed a very inverted way of going to compensate for a now resolved back injury may need Robaxin (methocarbamol) to relax some muscles and be comfortable when re-establishing muscles to allow them to go properly again. Medication should *NOT* be used just so some person can go off and win some ribbon that means absolutely nothing in the long run. There are no really good quick fixes when it comes to back injuries. Not to mention that drugs like bute (NSAIDs) should generally only be used under the recommendation of a vet given some of their risks re: colic treatment, etc. Yes, side effects usually require a long term course of bute, but I personally don't like to use these sorts of things just because. Heck, your mare could even have an ulcer, who knows.

    Also, if your horse is THAT sore, trailering could make things worse. Consider how much work it is for a horse to stay standing in a trailer, especially if the unexpected happens and you have to turn quickly, brake fast, and so on.
    ~T3DE 2010 Pact Clique~



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec. 1, 2005
    Location
    FL
    Posts
    721

    Default

    melodi....your post isn't harsh...just real. Obviously the OP intends to show so why not give advice on how the make the horse the as comfortable as possible? She has to live with her choices.

    We all hope she will call the vet asap...to rule out ulcers, ovarian cysts, etc.

    As an aside...if you are worried about ulcers, give 10 peppermint tums tablets or some maalox in a syringe right before the bute to protect the stomach. also, if you give the bute IV, it is still harsh on the stomach so give the tums as well.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug. 22, 2001
    Location
    Almost Aiken
    Posts
    2,691

    Default

    I don't know, if I tweaked something in my back before a show, I'd probably take a handful of Ibuprofen, do some stretching, ask someone to massage the kinks maybe, do the ice/heat/ice route, and I'd at least try and ride.

    I don't think that trying the same regime for the horse, and then doing a long gradual warmup to see how things feel is so bad. There's a difference between "a little stiff/NQR but functional" and out and out pain.

    I certainly don't advocate showing at all costs no matter how sore a horse may be, but if we never rode a horse who was showing signs of stiffness or unevenness, there'd be an awful lot of wondeful, happy but older & arthritic horses headin' down the road.

    ETA, that the wither soreness could be just skin inflammation from the saddle slipping up. It may go away as quickly as it came. Sort of like when you wear a bathing suit or a bra that doesn't fit quite right, and you get a chafed spot under your arm - it's horribly sensitive to touch for a day, and then it's fine if left alone. I hope that's all it is!



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan. 8, 2007
    Location
    Ithaca, NY
    Posts
    552

    Default

    I think what really concerns me about the OP's horse is the sudden nature of the pain. If she has the vet come out and clear the horse to go, than by all means go. But personally, if my back suddenly was REALLY bothering me, I'd need to get myself cleared by a professional before I'd go forward with competition (then again, I do have some budged discs in my lower back, so if I suddenly got whomped with pain, I'd be afraid I'd gone a bit too far and herniated one).

    As for showing older, uneven horses, and so on, I find there to be a bit of a difference between that and showing a horse that suddenly demonstrates signs of soreness. My gelding has a tight back and requires a good warm up before dressage. I've had it checked out, I know how to manage it as it's just muscle tightness, and I am taking the steps on my end necessary to make sure he is a-okay to go. It's the checking out and the managing that is very important to me, not this oh-god-show-tomorrow-fix-it-now approach. There has to be a certain willingness to forfeit and though the OP may not be a die hard, screw the horse type, it's a type I've seen far too often (a friend of mine worked at a BNT's H/J barn, some of the regiments of drugs these horses were on just to compete was bothersome).
    However, a little "NQR but functional" in a way that is new to a horse when we get to cross-country or stadium is completely unacceptable; it's barely acceptable when I get to the dressage ring. I know this is a dressage forum, but from the perspective of someone who goes at solid fences, if my horse has an unknown issue that he doesn't warm up out of, I'm not competing.

    But what works for backs in my experience? I agree with a long warm up, starting on a long rein with lots of suppling exercises. Sore-No-More brace/liniment is also great as well as the tried and true Vetrolin.
    ~T3DE 2010 Pact Clique~



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jul. 3, 2005
    Posts
    627

    Default

    Accupuncture. I have seen some amazing results with it and it is drug free. Not sure about the rules on it though.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Nov. 7, 2002
    Location
    Central FL
    Posts
    5,375

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rival View Post
    Accupuncture. I have seen some amazing results with it and it is drug free. Not sure about the rules on it though.

    completely legal, as is chiropractic.

    ESG ... how did it go? *fingers crossed*
    *=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Feb. 16, 2007
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    17

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Peggy View Post
    Robaxin is legal the night before, at least orally. You can use it w/bute.
    I am comepeting this weekend and my horse is on 2.5 gr. robaxin (5 gr./1000lb. can be given twice daily) once daily and 1 gr. bute twice daliy. The robaxin can only be given for 5 days before competition and at least 6 hours before competition. I was drug tested for the first time today so, I hope my vet and I read rules correctly. My horse gets massages as well, which helps alot as well.

    Here is the drug rules site:
    http://www.usef.org/documents/drugsM...nsPamphlet.pdf

    Good Luck!!
    You have to work with a horse, not against them!



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jan. 17, 2003
    Location
    Boston & NYC
    Posts
    1,019

    Default

    Robaxin and banamine would be my choice. Check the rules to know how much to give for sure. And read the NSAID rules carefully depending on what you choose - you cannot mix bute and banamine for example.
    Last edited by CAJumper; Jun. 17, 2007 at 12:44 AM. Reason: clarity
    "A goal without a plan is just a wish."



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Dec. 7, 2006
    Location
    Jupiter, FL
    Posts
    977

    Default

    For future reference, perhaps a Thinline or Ultra thinline half pad could help make a difference. They are thin enough that if your saddle "does" fit correctly, they don't alter fit...but provide a huge amount of shock absorption, and prevent any saddle slippage (in your case, onto the withers).
    Let us know how it went!



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